Ever Try To Capture Something in your Art but Can't?

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    551
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Ever Try To Capture Something in your Art but Can't?

    I suppose for those who draw, it can be quite a challenge to draw what we see in out minds. Say you think of something, like, a scene down a street or a person running and in your mind the colors, the shapes the look and feel are great, but whne you draw it your dissapointed because you think it looks like crap or its not what you intended. Is this something that will always presist or is it indeed possible to master the ability to capture an image from your mind into your art nearly perfectly?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Encinitas
    Posts
    1,542
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 9 Times in 6 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    the more you think about drawing something cool the more your gonna run into a mental block. i know this is gonan sound odd and lame but just draw. doodle randomness. dont think abut what your drawing and your more likely gonna see shapes and designs that look cool and things that can be made out of them. Andriod or Marko showed a technique they have used where you randomly scribble all over your paper midlessly till the page if full. once done look for shapes that resemble something liek an arm or face and pull that out and make something out of it.going into a drawing thinking you wanna draw some badass guy will more often then not not work because it can be pretty tricky till you have a better grasp on your drawing skills. but if you randomly see a cool shape that looks like it can be some sort of armor you get a unique looking peice of armor.

    i highly doubt any of the good concepts on this site started out in that persons head exactly how it translated on paper. its possible but very unlikely. hope his helps

    -=[ Sinister Six Sketch Group ]=-
    -=[ Cookiedough Fooxoo |ntern Hyver Character Evildisco]=-
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Southwestern Pennsylvania
    Posts
    7,134
    Thanks
    8,227
    Thanked 5,581 Times in 1,786 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    "Is this something that will always presist"

    Yes.

    Every day of your waking life.

    And, no. There's nothing you can do about it.

    It's part of what we are. The specific things will change, the complexity will be easier to cope with, and it may happen in lessor ways or amounts...

    ...but it will never stop.



    That wasn't a damn bit helpful, was it?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    pensacola Florida
    Posts
    46
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I cant capture perfection. Why is it so hard to draw a perfect image from your imagination? You see it so clearly, yet you cant put it on paper.

    From the valley of death I escaped...
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    2,250
    Thanks
    239
    Thanked 319 Times in 109 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    The positive side of this is sometimes things will accidentally turn out way better than you imagined.



    0kelvin

    www.WhereIsMyEyeball.com My portfolio! Go check it out!
    Sketchbook
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    2,925
    Thanks
    410
    Thanked 273 Times in 205 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    use reference.

    We may have a perfect image in our head BUT we are not familiar as to how to apply it.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    990
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 19 Times in 17 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    what you have in mind is at least 90% emotional and associative and only like 10% (if that!) concrete forms and shapes. so sorry you can tell me all you want about the awesomeness in your head - if that really was the case you would easily be able to draw and paint that stuff.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA US
    Posts
    1,127
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 77 Times in 50 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I find that often when drawing out of my head it helps to have some kind of ideal in mind that you're shooting for. But Intern is right in that it will also lead to some kinds of mental blocks. It helps if you are more loose in your ideas of what you're drawing than trying to think of something thats very concrete.

    Drawing is a process, what you're trying to do is the equivalent of imagining a whole short story in your head and then writing it down all at once. Once you start typing a few words you'd probably forget all about how the story was going to end. Whenever I put the first couple of lines down on the page I have to reassess what I'm doing and form a new ideal based on whats on the page and what I feel I can do next. The more you draw and practice the easier it gets to see a few steps ahead, I think. Its kind of like, you can easily imagine something that would look really awesome.. but do you know what steps you need to take in order to actually draw it? I imagine that the more experience you get, the easier it is to drop that stuff out of your head onto the paper but, there will probably always be some higher ideal in mind (or else how would you improve).

    Cave House Studios - creative animation and video
    What the Sketchbook
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    sweden
    Posts
    834
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 87 Times in 22 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    well i think it in this way, if you see an image like you said a street. Then you have to know your perspective good, and if theres a dude standing there you will have to be good at perspective,anatomy,folding cloth and so on.

    I 100% you can do whatever you have in your mind, you just need the knowledge and experience.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Oakville, ON
    Posts
    1,989
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Of course....all the time.....


    Happens less when I am doing commissioned work for someone else though....but for myself...yeah, all the time.

    ********************************
    There are 3 sides to every story. Yours, mine and THE TRUTH.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    2,925
    Thanks
    410
    Thanked 273 Times in 205 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    experience Quinster, experience.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    1,405
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 39 Times in 25 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    If what you wanted to draw was perfectly clear in your mind, you'd be able to draw it. Figuring out exactly what an image will look like before you even put your pencil to the paper is impossible.
    The good news is that you're able to work out simpler concepts in your mind and put them on paper with great ease after a while, and you can use the perfect image you have in your mind and work with it. Which is fun.

    But yeah, you can talk about it all you want, the only way you can understand it is to experience it for yourself. Practice.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    515
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 17 Times in 15 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Here's my suggestion-
    You have a cool idea in your head- like the street scene.
    Draw out quick little sketches, little ones not full page ones but just little sketches of the rough idea...do it a few times and play around with things like the perspective and the positioning of figures in the scene etc.
    Playing around on a smaller scale is good cause you don't worry about if it's perfect- it's just jotting down the idea. If it's not what you were imagining you can do another one in 30 seconds. In this way you can often improve on your original idea by trying different things out quickly...and it usually helps my creative juices to start flowing a bit more freely.

    Once you've got the idea down in a rough way you can start to plan it out properly. Don't expect it to happen in five minutes. If you really want it to look good, spend time on it. Think about positioning things, re-positioning things, rubbing out, trying again...think about colours, lighting- all those things...it can get frustrating but this is the kind of process even the great master painters went through.

    I'd say listen to intern's advice- find ways of getting things down on the page to get you started...even if you go out onto a street and start drawing that without ever taking your pencil off the paper...things like that can help. Once you've got something down you've got something to work with.

    Sydney artist Luke Marcatili

    "Fear is the mindkiller..."
    - The Litany Against Fear
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #14
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    551
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hmmm, you know looser ideas do work. When I draw something and don't really care how it turns out it ends up pretty good. However, being statisfied with something is basically impossible. The artist always sees his/her flaws even when other people don't. You cna hate a picture when others love it, all depends on how you feel. I should have known as much. Well, I don't know if I'll use the scribbles thing, but I'll just keep drawing and not owrry about it. The more and more you draw, the better and better you will become.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Saskanada
    Posts
    1,397
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 41 Times in 27 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    maybe the more techinical knowledge of how to draw something you have, then the less you have to think about making it look believeable(because it becomes more of an instinct) and you can just concentrate on how you think the design should look... i dunno

    doing some thumbnail sketchs of the idea might help you get what u want too

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Norwich, England, UK
    Posts
    2,787
    Thanks
    473
    Thanked 268 Times in 152 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    ....sometimes you have a picture in your head, and it may not turn out just how you wanted it to be; but sometimes, it turns out far better than you expected...

    Mx

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    20
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I often don't make any assumptions about what my artwork will look like prior to creating it. I have broad ideas of what it might be like and then let instinct take over.


    WHO WILL WIN?

    Conan O'Brien or
    a BEAR?

    www.conanvsbear.com
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    515
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 17 Times in 15 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quinster- The way I see it, you may never be fully satisfied with your own work but you shouldn't let that make you unhappy with your work.

    If you do get compliments on your work, take those compliments on board as much as the crits. I often take the crits a lot more seriously because it's easier to see your flaws than your strengths. But anyway take the compliments humbly and just know that you can and will improve on the next one.

    In a way I think one of the reasons we want to be great at art is to impress other people (c'mon admit it) and if people are already appreciating your work, even if you're a little unsatisfied, that should be something to be happy about.

    But at the same time, being unsatisfied with your work drives you to grow as an artist.

    Keep at it.

    Sydney artist Luke Marcatili

    "Fear is the mindkiller..."
    - The Litany Against Fear
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    9
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Just wait for Wacom to adopt this tecnology, problem solved.

    http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/heal...out525685.html

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Santa Rosa/San Anselmo, Calif.
    Posts
    3,392
    Thanks
    135
    Thanked 425 Times in 160 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    just about every time i do art.. not necessarily a bad thing if you look at it the right way...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook