Oil Painting Process: "Moon Called" Commercial Oil Painting Demonstration
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Thread: Oil Painting Process: "Moon Called" Commercial Oil Painting Demonstration

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    Oil Painting Process: "Moon Called" Commercial Oil Painting Demonstration

    Last edited by Sepulverture; November 25th, 2009 at 02:17 AM. Reason: Cleanup and re-organizing - Sepulverture
    - Dan Dos Santos
    www.dandossantos.com
     

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    The only bad part is that I wasn't there to watch you paint it. Dang it!
    Absolutely beautiful work, and thanks a lot for your in-depth tutorial. I will reference this bad boy whenever I do my next oil painting.

    Btw, did you use yellow green at all? I just double checked and I dont think you did.

    -ink

    -http://iwasink.com/-
    DS Illustration
    "Get reference.
    There is nothing wrong with using a photo to help you see things.
    No one complains about life drawing,
    so take a photo.
    its easy, and will improve your piece greatly."
     

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    Thanks alot DS. You did an awesome job on explaining your process, I think every painter appreciates this. I also thank you for explaining how to properly document your work. I've always had a problem with that (glares and all). Question: do you always lay down a drawing before painting? I've done that and my work and some of my professors (when giving demos) usually just throw doen painy. How do you handle going outside the line or painting up to the lines. How long do you work on a piece a day? I'm curious because I am about to try oils. I've always mostly done acrylic and I feel like I want to move on. Did you start out with oils? Sorry for all the ?'s. Anyways, I really liked how you try to keep to your sketch rather than giving in to reference. Thanks for sharing your work with us. It's always inspiring.

    = Visions

     

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    Q & A

    hey guys,
    thanks!!!!
    you really do make the extra effort worth it.
    i dont have time to thank you all individually, but i will answer any questions...

    Q: Why is there no magenta in your palette?
    A: Alizarin crimson thins out very much like a magenta. You can also check out Rembrandt's Permanent Madder Deep. It's a really nice permanent alizarin replacement, and it's a monopigment.

    Q: Why you are using board instead of canvas?
    A: I use board because it is smoother and allows a lot more detail. With canvas, you'd need another layer or so of underpainting just to smooth over the surface to make smaller details possible. Also during the painting cavases exhibit more glare, sometimes its hard to tell what color everything is. This doesnt happen with board. The only real advantage for canvas is that they need not be framed, but to those weary of framing costs this is a big advantage.

    Q: When the painting is finished, who gets to keep the original? You or the client? I am assuming there are copies made of your painting once it is finished.
    A: I do! The publisher typically purchases first-time printing rights. That means they buy the right to use it, not keep it. Some clients do a complete "buy out" and keep the original, but I usually don't do it.

    Q: I am curious as to what you think, do you care that your paintings will last over time or do you only care about the reproduction of your image for your clients in the illustration sense?
    A: Everything I use is pretty archival. it should last a century. when I mount the board I even use acid free tape. I may need to re-tape in a few years, but it wont damage the painting. but... if it came down to having to choose one over the other... definetly reproduction.

    Q: Are you laying in the drawing on the board with oils or acrylics?
    A: I lay in the drawing with oils, with lots of drier in my medium

    Q: Did you use yellow green at all? I just double checked and I dont think you did.
    A: Yeah, typically i use sooo much. I like to mix it with reds for good flesh tones. This was just a really cool-tinted painting and I didn't have any use for it. The same with yellow and orange.

    Q: Do you always lay down a drawing before painting?
    A: For an illustration, I always draw it first. Always!
    There is a style of painting called "alla prima" which means "one shot". You paint the painting from start to finish. This is common in life painting. When I work in this method (landscapes, still lifes, portraits), I do not do a drawing first.

    Q: Is the drawng in stage two the revised sketch you submitted to the AD?
    A: Yes, they thought the werewolf was too ominous.

    Q: How do you handle going outside the lines or painting up to the lines of your drawing ?
    A: I paint background to foreground. Since the background is generally the softest focus, the messiest stuff gets covered up as I go along. by the time I get to the foreground, I am usually using a much smaller brush.

    Q: How long do you work on a piece a day?
    A: Usually about 6 hours. I dilly-dally a bit... but I max out at about six straight hours.

    Q: Did you start out with oils?
    A: Yup. The drawing is oils.

    Q: You said you were using cobalt drier, but what are your thoughts on Japan drier?
    A: Hate it. It's too substantial, and ends up becoming a medium.

    Q: Is there a reason why you don't do a color sketch and pre-mix your colors from that? Or, is it because of the level you're at, that it's no longer necessary or takes up too much time?
    A: I can usually envision what I want, but on the more complicated pieces, I will do some color studies. Mostly, I do those digitally, due to time constraints. If it's a super subtle color I'm after, I will match a print out.

    Q: Does a client pay more when a piece is traditionally produced, or would the price be the same no matter the medium (digital or traditional)?
    A: It's different for every client, but I have met some that pay much less for digital. Some make no differentiation...But luckily, they never pay less for traditional.

    Q: Do you plan on creating/exhibiting non-commercial/personal paintings or does freelance take up all your time at the moment?
    A: I used to do a ton of gallery work. I still do if the illustration is slow, though that has been pretty infrequent of late.

    Q: How long have you been at this game and where do you see yourself in 10 years?
    A: I started painting in 1996 (though I've draw as long as I can remember). As to where I'll be in ten years?... hopefully on your bookshelf!

    Last edited by madster; September 15th, 2005 at 07:44 PM. Reason: Q & A Consolidation
    - Dan Dos Santos
    www.dandossantos.com
     

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    This is the best step by step painting tutorial I've seen.
    Man, thank you so much for "educating"

    Few questions, technique, business, and life related, if you can spare a moment:

    You said you were using cobalt drier, but what are your thoughts on Japan drier?

    what's a maulstick?

    Is there a reason why you don't do a color sketch and pre-mix your colors from that? Or, is it because of the level you're at, that it's no longer necessary or takes up too much time?

    Does a client pay more when a piece is traditionally produced, or would the price be the same no matter the medium (digital or traditional)?

    Do you plan on creating/exhibiting non-commercial/personal paintings or does freelance take up all your time ath the moment?

    How long have you been at this game and where do you see yourself in 10 years?

    Thanks again, man. I'm inspired. Alla prima is getting kinda...well,...just sketchy.

     

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    even if i couldnt read i could EASILY follow this tutorial

    youve done this before havent you?
    incredible:absolutely. how much did you charge for doing this painting?

    - Kinjark
     

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    Always awsome to see someone using the same painting program I am. Thanks for the tip on the retouch varnish. I was needing something to varnish a new oil painting by the end of this month and it certainly hasn't set long enough for regular varnish.
    Great tutorial. One of the best I've seen especially on using a traditional media. I'm going to have to try some of your techniques. I never have managed to get a really good pale skin tone in my work though I've tried a few times.

     

  10. #8
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    hey guys,

    i just made this tutorial into a .pdf file,
    available for download on my website.

    - Dan Dos Santos
    www.dandossantos.com
     

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  12. #9
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    Thanks a lot for this wonderful and detailed process demonstration D, this is a fine and very informative tutorial.

    Sepulverture's Sketchbook Page 1 Page 19
    Sepulvertures Extended Studies Page 1
    page 2

    Tutorials Tips and Tricks needs you to stay alive!"
     

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