Would You Goto A Comic Book Convention to Apply For A Job, to be a comic book artist?

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    Would You Goto A Comic Book Convention to Apply For A Job, to be a comic book artist?

    http://www.dccomics.com/about/submissions.html

    People keep telling me there's not too much difference between being a concept artist and a comic book artist....except comic book artists get less pay.

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    If it would land me that job I want, I'm prepared to go the distance....even if it means I gotta go to a convention to land a job.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NoSeRider
    People keep telling me there's not too much difference between being a concept artist and a comic book artist....except comic book artists get less pay.
    Whip out the similarities NoSeRider !

    I mean,
    Comic books artists narrate a story through their art!
    Concept artists design characters for clients!
    ???

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    Comic Book artist has to design composition of scene, design a character to his/her own style, design buildings, cars, etc etc all in perspective.......and do sequential art.

    Maybe concept art is more detailed, but comic art is just concept art only in the trenches where you focus on one subject matter repeatedly.

    http://www.dccomics.com/media/excerpts/1789_x.pdf

    Actually, if you doubt Comic Book Art is akin to Concept Art, I suggest you download that PDF Adobe Acrobat file and Look at Travis Charest's work.
    http://www.dccomics.com/graphic_novels/?gn=1789

    Last edited by NoSeRider; June 6th, 2005 at 05:46 PM.
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    OK...so if we're comparing...how is comic art like or unlike illustration? (ie. book covers, interior art for RPGs, card art, etc...) I mean...the things you described comic art needing are, to me, all required of traditional illustrators, with the added need to make the pages themselves composed nicely and the flow of time working from panel to panel.

    There are obvious similarities and differences in any given commercial art field...I fail to see the point of arguing them...

    "Every generation sees the past though the lens of its own time." - Thom Hartmann
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    I just write bad.

    Whip out the similarities NoSeRider !


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    The only similarities are...lots of drawing and lots of hours

    Let's not get into subtleties now

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    "Would You Goto A Comic Book Convention to Apply For A Job, to be a comic book artist?"

    I just "retired" after 40 years as a conceptual designer, executing work for tasteless, brain-dead, penny-pinching bastards of all stripes who all "knew more than I did."

    Gee...what will I do now? ...I KNOW! I'll become a comic book artist...right after I stick the muzzle of a .357 mag in my right ear and pull the trigger.

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    uhhh.. ok then...

    *backs away from Ilaekae*

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    How often do comic artists actually get to work on a book of their own creation? It seems like alot of the work, especially while "climbin the ladder" would be workin on other people's books.

    In regard to goin to a convention to get a job, I think its probably like trying to go to SIGGRAPH to get a job..its the best and the worst place for it. In one hand you have alot of the top employers in the field there and often conducting interviews, and on the other hand you are one amounst the teeming masses throwing a demoreel at anyone who will stop long enough to get hit by it. So pontential is there, but competition is also going to be at its toughest....then again I don't work in the comic industry (not that I wouldn't like too ) so I may just be talking out my ass....its a shame there isn't a smiley for that...

    peas

    James Ball

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    Well, NoSeRider, it sounds like you have a pretty cavalier attitude about comic art. It's a real discipline, with three vital areas of concentration: 1. The ability to draw anything. 2. The ability to tell a story with pictures. 3> Last, but certainly not least, the ability to run your business. Getting a job in comics is like landing a role on Broadway- there are few spots, and many auditioners. You'd better be able to outdo the other guy, and entertain your audience, to boot! You'd be up against people who are fiercely dedicated to the genre, people who live, eat and breathe comics. Is that you? Are you willing to work alone, illustrating a minmum of 23 11x 17 sheets of blank paper with an average of 100 or so opanels every 4 weeks? It's a publisher's market, with that many artists competing for work. There are plenty who, sadly, chew up talent and spit it out, knowing there will always be another kid to step in and do the work. I've been through this mill, loved my time there, and never once looked back when I moved on. If you think this is for you, then going to comic shows is the way to get work. You've got to get face time with the editors, to plug your work and yourself, letting them know they can trust you with the job. After all, so many artists flake out on deadlines, leaving them in the lurch. Comics is not a field to take lightly. For that matter, concept art is a step up from that, and if anybody thinks it would be easier, then they need to reevaluate your career goals. Consider this tough love from someone who's been there, and I can only urge you to dedicate yourself to it, to go out and get the jobs and live your dream. It's worth it- I wouldn't change it anything!

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    "uhhh.. ok then...

    *backs away from Ilaekae*"


    Hahahahaha...sorry, 'stoph. Didn't mean to scare you. I just recently returned to a place I can do my OWN work as I see fit. Imagining myself arguing with editors, publishers and censors again just freaks me out a bit...

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    it sounds like you have a pretty cavalier attitude about comic art
    Cavalier?

    My iconic artists that I've always admired were Neal Adams, John Buscema and old John Byrne......only recently have I been looking at Brom, Sargent and Phil Hale.....amoung others.

    I just got disillusioned by the crap that was published by mainstream comics in the 90's. Now I see traditional skills are making a come back in the Comic Book Industry.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cthogua
    How often do comic artists actually get to work on a book of their own creation?
    When they do it online.

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    SJ: Fair enough

    What I ment was more like...How often do comic book artists get paid to work on a book of their own creation? I don't know about comics for sure, but in most other publisher run "art" industries the artists are at the bottom of the rung as far as decision making goes...you draw, model, texture, paint whatever you're given and according to how you're told. Eventually talented, and passionate artists work there way up to Lead and Art Director positions, where more creative input is possible. However that is often traded for more time spent managing people, direction, and assets and less actually creating art....anyway..I'm still lookin for that "talking out my ass" smiley Just some thoughts based on what I've read/obeserved.

    Noserider: I didn't mean to come off being negative about you looking for work in the comics biz, from past exchanges I know you are both knowledgable and passionate about them and what I've seen of your artwork rocks. I say bring it to 'em!

    Ia Ia Cthulhu Fthagn

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  17. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cthogua
    SJ: Fair enough

    What I ment was more like...How often do comic book artists get paid to work on a book of their own creation? I don't know about comics for sure, but in most other publisher run "art" industries the artists are at the bottom of the rung as far as decision making goes...you draw, model, texture, paint whatever you're given and according to how you're told. Eventually talented, and passionate artists work there way up to Lead and Art Director positions, where more creative input is possible. However that is often traded for more time spent managing people, direction, and assets and less actually creating art....anyway..I'm still lookin for that "talking out my ass" smiley Just some thoughts based on what I've read/obeserved.
    And expanding on what I said, after observing the current status of things, going by what people say on these boards and what I've seen elsewhere, I came the to the inescapable conclusion that the only way for comic artists to make it their way is online. There are a handful of people who make money their living off of their webcomics. It's not impossible, you just have to be damn good and have a bit of a business sense. That's the best job in the world, in my opinion: you draw what the hell you want and you answer to no one. Syndicated comics in newspapers are going down the drain rapidly, as the papers gain little to nothing from them and they have become a money-hole. Scott Kurtz pulls down more a year by himself online than any syndicated cartoonist, and the guys at Penny Arcade have a voice not only with the majority of gamers worldwide but also with the companies themselves. The Internet is the best thing that ever happened to the comic artist community. It removes the communication gap that made synicates a necessity for artists to get their inspiration to the masses. With advertising, webcomickers are interconnectedly making themselves a more-and-more well-known community. Mac Hall gives a discount to webcomic sites who want to advertise with them, and I imagine that other sites do something similar. For me, anyway, that's the place to be, and that's my goal.

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