19th century revolutionary art....help!

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  1. #1
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    19th century revolutionary art....help!

    hey all for english at school(yes, english not ART) we are studying how ppl in the 19th Century broke free of the restrictive beliefs of the era--I can include an artwork as a related text to use in my exam paper

    so does anyone know of any artists from 1800-1900 who broke the widely held beliefs of the era to satisfy their individual needs through an artwork?

    I've looked in the library but its kind of convoluted language that doesnt help unless I have more of a specific target for who to look for
    sorry I know its a boring question , etc. but I really need HELP from anyone who has studied art history or has a good idea of artists of that era. I'm thinking something to do with the beginnings of modern art or the avant garde
    THANKS

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  3. #2
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    What exactly was there beliefs?

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  4. #3
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    Do some research on Aubrey Beardsley ( 1872-98 ) who was one of the catalysts in the beginning of the art nouveau movement.

    His work was very controvercial and broke the mold in a lot of ways. Probably a good place to start...

    Aubrey Beardsley
    "Salome" 1892

    - Painted for his friend Oscar Wilde, depicts Salome kissing the severed head of John The Baptist.

    Hope it helps. Enjoy.

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  5. #4
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    Or try Francisco de Goya ( 1746-1828 ) a little earlier but a fantastic example of misanthropy and political rebellion. Probably just as good or better an example than Mr Beardsley.

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    Adding to what Form just mentioned - you could dig up some old French Revolution stuff, mostly dealing with the same political stuff. There's quite a lot on the subject, a google search should give you some good information.

    Last edited by darkarts; May 28th, 2005 at 12:37 PM.
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    Cow

    Here's some example of painters who changed the art history in the second half of the 19th century :
    - Gustave Courbet introduced "naturalism" in painting : that means he represented poor people, industry workers in realistic situations (a strike, a burial etc...), while "academic" painters prefered to represent mythological scene. He also painted a close up to a vagina, in a painting called "the world's origin". Of course his paintings used to be refused in official exhibitions.
    - Edouard Manet had a similar approach, but with a rougher touch.
    - Turner, who started his carreer as a realistic painter, progressively got a wild, rough touch, perfect to express speed, thunder, fire...
    - Claude Monet, Auguste Renoir and Whistler experimented a brand new way to represent light : with little touches that make a global vibration, totally unexpected. These painters were obliged to show their work in a special exhibition : the "refused painters' exhibition", because no gallery wanted to show their work !
    - To finish, Jean Dominique Ingres is an interesting case : he was one of the best drawers and painters of his generation, recognized and honoured by everybody at his time, BUT he started at the end of his life to experiment new anatomical representations ("the turkish bath"), that would lead, 30 years later, to Picasso's cubism.
    Etc, etc ....

    Hope it will help.

    ____________

    = W A N D E R E R =
    C O M I C B O O K A R T I S T

    ++ FLESH AND FOAM ++
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  8. #7
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    As already mentioned, Whistler might be a good choice, very unpopular with certain members of the art establishment which led to quite a famous libel case, google "Whistler Ruskin court case", should give you enough to get started.

    Manet, definitely another possibility, google "Manet Olympia" one of the more controversial piccies of the era..

    -Steve

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