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Thread: Photoshop

  1. #1
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    Photoshop

    I just got photoshop this weekend as a trial and i see you guys makes these awesome colored pictures using this i was just wandering how do you start this thing off cause using a mouse it tough... to draw that its...


    Do you guys just get work you drew with hand and color it or free hand it?
    ShaviSan Shavone G.


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    Unless you have amazing patience, a graphics tablet is what most people use. Some people can work with a mouse, but even then the results are a bit uneven.

    As for how to start, you can go either way. Some people go straight digital, others scan in their drawings then color. If you are still in the learning stages of drawing it's usually best to keep working on paper. Having the undo function when working digitally can make you a little sloppy when you go traditional. There should be a few Photoshop tutorials in the tutorial section. Plus try polykarbon.com and http://www.walkthroughs.nu (I think that's the right address).

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    Of course, most people upgrade to tablets, after starting out drawing with a mouse, so don't get discouraged.
    This guy paints with nothing BUT a mouse, and PhotoDeluxe, a REAL low-end application...

    Here are some tips:
    1. Work as LARGE as you can, and still see what you are doing. This makes your mouse movements much smaller, which enables you to get smoother strokes.
    2. Every few minutes, STEP AWAY FROM YOUR MONITOR! Take a look at what you are doing from a distance of at least 3-4 feet. You'll be surprised at what you will notice from a distance.
    3. Save your work regularly. Working with a mouse makes it that much worse to lose everything because you forgot to save...
    4. Take your time. Since a mouse isn't as responsive or controllable as a tablet and stylus, if you want what you paint to look good, DON'T RUSH! By taking your time now, you'll create something that you can appreciate years from now, because you took the time to make it look good.

    Here are a few tutorial Mouse Painting links that might help you:
    http://www.wetcanvas.com/ArtSchool/D...ssons/Lesson5/
    http://www.wetcanvas.com/ArtSchool/D...ssons/Lesson9/
    http://www.robertocampus.com/n_tutor...orialsouleater
    http://elfwood.lysator.liu.se/farp/r...larealism.html

    And here's another cool painting application you might enjoy (check out their tutorials!)
    http://www.pixarra.com/
    Like everything else in Life, there are a myriad of ways to reach any destination, depending on the intensity of your desire to succeed. You can do wonders with a mouse and a drawing application. Play, experiment, PRACTICE. If you find you enjoy the experience, pick up a tablet and expand your horizons, but don't invest in one until you see how comfortable you are with digital painting. It's much different from the real world, and some traditional artists don't like it, and a lot of digital artists never master it, but getting there sure is half the fun!
    Change is Inevitable, Growth is Optional
    I am The Choosen One!
    Jason sez: Draw more from Life!


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    Quote Originally Posted by madster
    Of course, most people upgrade to tablets, after starting out drawing with a mouse, so don't get discouraged.
    This guy paints with nothing BUT a mouse, and PhotoDeluxe, a REAL low-end application...

    Here are some tips:
    1. Work as LARGE as you can, and still see what you are doing. This makes your mouse movements much smaller, which enables you to get smoother strokes.
    2. Every few minutes, STEP AWAY FROM YOUR MONITOR! Take a look at what you are doing from a distance of at least 3-4 feet. You'll be surprised at what you will notice from a distance.
    3. Save your work regularly. Working with a mouse makes it that much worse to lose everything because you forgot to save...
    4. Take your time. Since a mouse isn't as responsive or controllable as a tablet and stylus, if you want what you paint to look good, DON'T RUSH! By taking your time now, you'll create something that you can appreciate years from now, because you took the time to make it look good.

    Here are a few tutorial Mouse Painting links that might help you:
    http://www.wetcanvas.com/ArtSchool/D...ssons/Lesson5/
    http://www.wetcanvas.com/ArtSchool/D...ssons/Lesson9/
    http://www.robertocampus.com/n_tutor...orialsouleater
    http://elfwood.lysator.liu.se/farp/r...larealism.html

    And here's another cool painting application you might enjoy (check out their tutorials!)
    http://www.pixarra.com/
    Like everything else in Life, there are a myriad of ways to reach any destination, depending on the intensity of your desire to succeed. You can do wonders with a mouse and a drawing application. Play, experiment, PRACTICE. If you find you enjoy the experience, pick up a tablet and expand your horizons, but don't invest in one until you see how comfortable you are with digital painting. It's much different from the real world, and some traditional artists don't like it, and a lot of digital artists never master it, but getting there sure is half the fun!

    interesting, what opacity do you usually use on your paintbrush? obviously it's going to depend on the effect you want, but say you want the brush to act a s an HB pencil. (i have a tablet).

    furthermore, to shavisan, you may want to look into the other options of photoshop, it's mainly meant to be used as a digital alteration program instead of from scratch, although a lot of folks do that, including myself... however knowing what some of the finer features like channels, blending and Image>>adjustments will really help in making your process smooth and less frusterating. I've been using PS for quite awhile and I still learn new things every once and awhile, but being armed with the knowledge of the program as well as the shortcuts(very handy) is probably the best place to start...

    For me I am self taught without any manuals, but that's mostly because I'm not really a manual kind of guy i like to get in there and make mistakes and bounce around. It may be faster and more enjoyable for you to use a prefabricated manual...

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