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  1. #1
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    Comp Requirements for digital painting

    Hey guys, I am looking to getting a new computer soon, and i was wondering what type of things should i get so that my digital painting softwares Photoshop CS, and corel painter ix, will run really smoothly. Also looking at a getting a new monitor but i dont know, are lcd's good or what? What size woudl you recommend etc, any other info on computer speed etc for artists, please tell me thankss

    Justin


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  3. #2
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    There are two things you can't skimp on, when you want your computer to run smoothly.

    Ram, and processor speed. 512mb or ram is good. A gig is better. I'd say that for a new computer, don't get less than a gig. You don't want the thing to absolutely suck in 3 months.

    Also, don't get a Celeron (if you get a pentium) or a Sempron (if you get an AMD).

    Plenty of HD space. I think 80 to 100 gigs is more or less the market standard.

    As for monitor. This is a point of contention among some, but I'll offer my 2 cents.

    Don't get an LCD as your only monitor. Things look different on each. Most Dell (or equivalent) lcd monitors that come with various package deals usually suck. Your contrasts will be off, and you will never have a true black in your monitor. Often there are also some color correction issues.

    Mind you, they are nice for anything but painting/designing on. Also, they're tiny, whereas CRT's are huge.

    It's up to you, but I wouldn't advise getting an LCD as your only monitor. If you're intending to use the computer for gaming as well, you'll likely get a new video card. Many nowadays support two monitors. Set up the CRT as your secondary, to make sure what you're making looks the way you think it does.

    Beyond that, iMacs, eMacs, and Mac Mini's are all pretty competetively priced. I won't sing the praises of apple right now, but they're nice computers, and really nice to design on.

  4. #3
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    Many nowadays support two monitors. Set up the CRT as your secondary...
    I would go so far as to say that for any kind of art & graphics work, 2 monitors are a requirement. Photoshop, Painter and most other graphics programs have large, clunky tool palettes that can obstruct the view of your work but also need to be readily available. A 2nd monitor is a convenient place to group all of these palettes. Fortunately, you don't have to spend a fortune on a 2nd monitor and it doesn't have to be huge. Just doing a quick search turned up this.
    Mark Hannon
    Art Direction & Design
    Online Portfolio

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    Get as much memory as possible, that's the thing would help to avoid lags when you paint on large areas.
    Also, try to set aside a large chunk of HDD space for virtual memory, it's the next best thing you can do to make up for the lack of memory space. Also, try to partition your harddrive to at least two sectors (3 is recommended though), so that you can at least set one partition aside as a scratch disk. If you set up 3, you can set one as all the file saving partition, so you dont need to back up everything everytime you want to do a format, etc.

    LCD, actually some of the new LCD are just like CRT. My roomate had one of those, no matter what angle you look at it, color and lighting doesn't change at all. Just make sure you go to a nearby store and look at the real thing with teh same model first before you buy it.

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    hmmm, thanks guys

    figure 2, you said:

    2 monitors are a requirement


    Well, i had 2 monitors before, but for some reason i didnt like it, because, i use a tablet, for browsing etc.. even photoshop. And when i had things on my other monitor, or have it on etc... It would some how split my tablet in half and i could only paint on half of my tablet, is there a way this can be fixed?

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustinBeckett
    hmmm, thanks guys

    figure 2, you said:

    2 monitors are a requirement


    Well, i had 2 monitors before, but for some reason i didnt like it, because, i use a tablet, for browsing etc.. even photoshop. And when i had things on my other monitor, or have it on etc... It would some how split my tablet in half and i could only paint on half of my tablet, is there a way this can be fixed?
    There's a setting in wacom software configuration, you can configure it so that the mouse can go across both monitors, but the pen will stay in one monitor. Although it get annoy when you put all the tool and layer windows in one and your pen cannot go out of the canvas monitor.

  8. #7
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    Yes, it's a setting on your tablet's drivers.

    Although Painter only works on one monitor, meaning you can't move your pallettes to the other side. Photoshop's pallettes let you do whatever you want with them.

    Also, most tablets only work on one monitor to give you optimal usage of the tablet area. Therefore, you should keep a good mouse handy, if not just the tablet's mouse, which sometimes can be a little wonky to use.

    I've got all three, just because each one was cheap.

  9. #8
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    I'm not a pro so maybe I won't have much say in this but I don't think you need two monitors. If you have an extra one, go ahead and use it as a second one but don't buy two new ones. Better to buy one really good one. Just make a concious decision to learn the keyboard shortcuts and you'll find that a second monitor for your tools is pointless. When you learn the keyboard shortcuts it will mean you can work in fullscreen mode with no palettes up. Make your canvas slightly bigger and put dabs of the colors you'll need and then you can just use your eyedropper.

    By the way, I checked out your website and sometimes the image links will open up in a new window and sometimes they'll open in the original window.
    Last edited by Joeslucher; May 4th, 2005 at 04:02 PM.

  10. #9
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    cool thanks again.

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