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  1. #1
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    The art of: What Dreams May Come?

    Does anyone know if they have made this or can anyone give me the names of the artists that did this amazing movie?

    I watched this last night for the first time and all I Can say is if you have never seen this movie go watch it now, it is by far one of the best ive ever seen.


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  3. #2
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    OMG. I totally agree! Its based on Dantes Divine Comedy if im correct. Great movie!!
    Some people are like slinkys, not really good for anything, but funny when they fall down the stairs.

  4. #3
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    Hey, Shakespeare quote!

    "For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
    When we have shuffled of this mortal coil?
    Must give us pause; there's the respect
    That makes calamity of so long life."

    -Hamlet, Act III, Scene I

  5. #4
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    I saw that movie around the time that it came out, and to this day, it is one of thea most visually stunning films I have ever seen. Honestly, I think it was ahead of it's time, considering movies like Hero, and that film's use of colors to illustrate different facets of the story, and the way in which memory is described as idealized, or at very least stylized and construed, in a way that makes it more or less accurate, but certainly funnelled through a certain lens.

    I looked it up on IMDB, and Mauro Borrelli and Simon Murton did most of the concept design. Apparently Murton also worked on the Matrix and iRobot as well, but I can't find a website for him. Also credited is Sherman Labby, who apparently worked on this film as a production illustrator. He was, from what I can gather on google, from the old school of production art, being born in 1929, He worked on films like Xanadu, Blade Runner, and The Journey Back To Oz. Apparently he died in 1998, and What Dreams May Come and Mighty Joe Young were his last two films.

  6. #5
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    i've never heard of it, is it good? post a link.
    Do you know the muffinman?

    Originally Posted by creatix
    Once you understand what the word "stupid" means - age is no longer a valid excuse for being that way.

  7. #6
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    go rent it, its one of the best flicks you will see I guarntee!

  8. #7
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    I loved that movie. Paul hit it on the head: visually stunning to be sure. Been meaning to rewatch that for a while. DVD's been collecting dust on my shelf. Maybe I'll do that this weekend.
    "Every generation sees the past though the lens of its own time." - Thom Hartmann

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    o, and I dont really think it was ahead of its time because I dont think there was really that much cg in it...was there?
    if anything it might have been the end of the old great movie making techniques with real matte paintings and what not. either way it rocks.

  10. #9
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    As far as I know there is no book, but besides the previously mentioned artists Andrew Burward-Hoy also did some work for it and you can see that work at www.famousframes.com just look up is name then goto films and viola

  11. #10
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    Ben Proctor might have done some work on that film, there are a couple shots from the movie in his demo clip, you should check it out it's good.

  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noc
    o, and I dont really think it was ahead of its time because I dont think there was really that much cg in it...was there?
    Don't get me wrong, I agree with you to an extent, but I can't help but cringe a little when it comes to comments such as those. It appears that such issues as the visual dynamic of a film are overshadowed nowadays by the means whereby they are achieved. It seems that complexity, overshadows style, and that the adage of less is more, has been made into more is more. The visual style of this film seems to have been based on the directors ability to put into a shot only the elements that are necessary for the scene to have it's necessary impact. I have seen all too many films where there have been CG shots for the sake of inserting eye candy. Shots where a single warrior dispatches a horde of demons/robots/whatever, with one fell swoop, one cataclysmic explosion, one discharge of some kind of laserbeam, etc.

    Inside of my mind, rather than think wow, he got all of them!, I think rather that they were never there in the first place. Think battle scenes in the movie Spawn vs. those in Saving Private Ryan. Both incorporated CG, as well as a large group of extras. One, however, relied on the utmost of what CG could offer, rather than taking only what they needed from the realm of CG. The other did the very opposite. They made CG work for them, rather than having the look determined by what CG could do. They made it so that the CG was used sparingly, only when the only solution would be CG. It seems all too often that CG is the first choice for a visual effect, when in fact CG does not look at all as real as something that is in fact real.

    I believe that it is not the medium, but the technique, and attention to detail, as well as the artists' hard work and dedication to a project that determine a shot's believability. CG, it seems, has diminished the luster of hollywood magic, in that when a scene like the city on the stone arch in What Dreams May Come would have been shown in a film made before 1990, an audience would have been astonished, and the effect would have been all the more powerful that the shot would have been able to have been accomplished, but the director and crew would have had to rack their brain trying to figure out how to get it to work. And a seasoned visual effects department (the oldschool type) would have been able to do it. And a film like that would have stood the test of time.

    That being said, and skipping over some examples, I have to say that that same shot, were the movie made now, and even in 1998 when it was made, it would have taken half the people, half as long to achieve the same shot. This is the case in any movie where shots of this complexity are necessary.

    It is in that regard that I feel the CG has desensitized the viewer into a false sense of the wonder and amazement once a part of the viewers seeing of a film with the visual style of WDMC some 15 years ago.

    Nowadays, shots like that can be inserted into whatever storyline a director wants to put them in. Thus, every 'B' movie can have scenes that the plot in itself is not worthy of.

    It cheapens the overall experience, is all I'm saying.

    I dunno, but I've still got love for the oldschool.

    And honestly, I think that more movies should explore the options that analog visual effects would offer, before relegating the whole of a scripts visual effects to the realm of CG. It's likely (with the speed and volume necessary to achieve some CG effects) given the number of CG modellers, Texture Artists, Motion Capture Artists, etc, who would have to be employed to execute a scene, would it be all that much cheaper?

    I have to say that these are issues that plague me, as I begin pursuing art, in both the digital and analog realms. As computers become better able to emulate the look of hand drawn/painted work, even the appearance of constructs, and people, for that matter, I ever more begin to think that it's not necessary to learn analog techniques, aside from the fact that I really want to.

    That being the case, it seems ever more that hand-produced art is adopting ever more a semblance of 'kitsch', or at least losing it's own sanctity, as the sheer volume, speed, and ever greater realism and complexity are being added to the realm of computer generated artwork.

    Does anyone else who felt like reading my whole post in any way agree with any of that, or care to discuss it further?

    I'm just kind of riding in the middle of the road, so to speak, as far as 'old' vs. 'new' goes.

    Let me know what you think.
    Last edited by PaulGanguly; September 4th, 2005 at 04:11 AM.

  13. #12
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    AGREED!

    You know, Princess Mononoke is said to be very ahead of its time, and no CG was used in that.

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