outlines???

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  1. #1
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    outlines???

    Ive noticed alot of you have a cool comic book like style with ur outlines. I was just wondering if you outline first, then color around, color first, then outline, or maybe outline on a different layer entirely? Fill me in!

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    I think By and large people pen out their drawings before-hand and then paint underneath them. I, for one, put my line drawing on a seperate layer and set it to multiply. Check www.agent44.net for Jake Parker's tutorial on how he does his art...

    -Sean

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    I draw my outline, scan it in. Contrast it so it becomes pure black (without becoming 'pixely' (blocky)) and pure white, delete the white. Then make my outline my background layer and put everything in layers on top of it. The major advantage to this is i can go back and easily color my lines. I usually turn them into a real dark shade of the color that it's outlining. However, if you don't plan on coloring the lines you can skip the part of getting rid of the white.

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    outlines

    Some people use multiply on a layer, and that is one way...but in my opinion there's a slightly better way. It's the method they use in comics (well I don't know if all or most of the comic colorists do it this way).. At least it's the Wildstorm method. Using Channels first, then making it a layer.

    Scan image...if it's inked, scan b/w as opposed to grayscale. Of course you can scan greyscale also. I usually scan grayscale if it's pencil or duh...has gray. If grayscale, adjust levels/curves as necessary to darken the lineart and lightening some of the gray/white. Ultimately, if you scan it b/w, convert to grayscale. Maybe it doesn't make sense, but there's things you can't do in b/w or as it's called bitmap mode. converting it to grayscale doesn't really change the image much if at all.

    So at this point it's a grayscale image. In channels make a copy and rename the copy "lineart" or whatever you want. I believe the default color of the alpha channel is red/50%. Change that to black/100%. In the channels it doesn't matter the color, cause it's not going to print anyway. Just make it black enough. Then, click on the original channel and fill with white, so it's blank. Convert to RGB mode. So you will be left with 4 RGB channels and one "lineart" channel. Ctrl-left click on the lineart channel, then inverse it (ctrl-shift+ i) so the black/gray is all selected. Go to layers tab and create new layer (make sure it's transparent) and fill here with the color you're going to print with (like black). On this layer you can eventually change the color of the lineart, otherwise known as "knocking out" the line art or K.O.

    At this point you can color on the background layer beneath it, or make a new layer, or even make a new layer on top of the lineart layer if you choose. That should be about it. it may sound more complicated than just turning the layer to multiply, but to me it seems more "pure". I don't know how much of a difference there is, but you can easily change the color of the lineart this way. Again by Ctrl-left clicking the layer. (if it doesn't select just the lineart, it's probably not transparent) Let me know if this makes sense or doesn't make sense or if there are any questions

    Ryan

    www.odagawa.com
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    I actually do nearly all of my sketching directly in Photoshop, so most of my pencils and inks are layers with no background...no need to futz with Mutliply mode. But yeah, like most people, I ink first and then color in layers below.

    I usually block out the base colors on one layer, then add all the shading in another layer. I often put colors for specific objects on different layers to keep them all organized, and I also make sure to put all related layers in Layer Folders.

    Sometimes for soft objects, such as the orc's flag over at http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...&threadid=4967 , I do all my shading my creating two Curves Adjustment Layers (one that darkens and one that lightens) and painting directly into those layer's masks using black and white airbrushes at 20% - 50% opacity. This way if the shading or highlights become too heavy overall, I can just adjust the Adjustment Layer's opacity to ease off. It's a good way to dial in tone as a final tweak.

    HTH,
    -Atomick

    --------------------------------------------
    freelance imagemaker + digital experience designer
    http://www.atomick.net
    --------------------------------------------
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