Art: Are there any special or specific exercises for improving visualization?
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Are there any special or specific exercises for improving visualization?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    95
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Are there any special or specific exercises for improving visualization?

    Yes, looking at things and drawing them are key to gathering information for later, but I find that when I do look at something, I can't really draw it from memory later. Even simple things just barely out of the basic shapes can get skewed in my mind's eye if I don't have something to look at. Is there a book or a method you know of to hone my realistic imagination skills?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Gilbert Arizona
    Posts
    3,030
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 163 Times in 136 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    It's true our memories can't be trusted to tell us exactly how things really looked.
    My painting teacher used to say this: "paint 100 landscapes and you will start to be good at landscapes. Paint 100 portraits and your 101st will look kinda' good"
    So the simplest thing that I can say is this: Draw a hundred faces from life and you will have trained yourself to the point that you can occasionally draw from memory.
    Look at people's sketchbooks here. Almost without exception their life drawings are realistic, natural, fluid and fully detailed. Stuff from their imagination tends to be stiff and amature by comparison.
    Good luck and have fun. It's not like there's anything else you'd rather be doing.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    LA
    Posts
    554
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 14 Times in 10 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Drawing from memory is a tricky thing, I've found. When i look at something, there's just so much visual information that it's kinda hard to remember everything. Our brains only allow parts of things to be remembered, the rest is "made up" or filled in. But, I have seen people who can draw something from memory almost perfectly. And Gilead's right. It's a lot of practice and training of visual memory. I know there's probably more to it but, for the most part, I think it's looking at something and taking in everything you see, no detail spared. A certain highlight, a measurement, everything. In time, your memory usually gets better with training and you start to remember more about the objects.

    Drawing from the imagination is basically the same. Practice. Draw as much as you can from life *and* supplement that with sketching from the imagination. It keeps your arm moving and your brain thinking. Sometimes I find that if I concentrate on an object in my head and try to visualize it from all possible viewpoints, I find that I can draw it much more accurately to what I had imagined. Sometimes when we draw, our mind just tends to wander and we really don't end up drawing what we want to. Basically, you want to keep your mind on a leash heh This might be different for you but it has helped me somewhat.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    742
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    find excellent ref. photography such as stuff from National Geo. then flip the magazine upside down and draw the images like that. it'll help you start to see relationships between light and dark and you'll ignore the 'symbols' that have been holding you back.

    Those who make religion their god will not have God for their religion.

    Thomas Erskine


    Crit for a Crit: My Online Sketchbook of Super Power Fun
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    my mind
    Posts
    1,828
    Thanks
    553
    Thanked 969 Times in 829 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    hello

    i thing you want capture some scene, face, pose or anything that gave a feeling you want save on your paper (or reproduce) if it's your goal so ....

    you just have to learn illustrating, (drawing from memory) you begin by drawing from life and learning basics, your goal is to capture that scene by all mean it's don't have to be complex (each line you saw) but the important...

    i don't think there is a human able to shoot a pic on his mind like a camera , he record the important things and use simplify it then reproduce it.
    for example: gesture drawing, you capture the pose of a man by just some few strokes.
    so ... you have to learn drawing from a to z

    good luck

    ps: i'm devilish , i know

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by ApolloNuevo
    find excellent ref. photography such as stuff from National Geo. then flip the magazine upside down and draw the images like that. it'll help you start to see relationships between light and dark and you'll ignore the 'symbols' that have been holding you back.
    im gonna try this
    its a great idea

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Kaunas, Lithuania
    Posts
    169
    Thanks
    287
    Thanked 96 Times in 42 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Maybe I'm just plain wrong here, but here goes...

    You don't nescessarily have to remember the coordinates of every highlight, exact details and exact tonal relationships. You can just remember the angle your facing the subject, the main gesture/features of the subject so you can Construct it later (and anatomy/construction is well worth learning), the lighting conditions (light direction, surface-light distance for determining faloff, etc) and the material (plaster cast will have alot of light bouncing around, flesh is translucent, etc) your drawing, so you can build your shading with logic thinking later, like "this plane is closer to the spotlight, so it's brighter, that plane is not facing the light, it's darker, that plane gets some bounced light... etc."
    I remember reading some info about drawing from memory somewhere online, it included a list of top priority things to remember when looking at the model. Can't find it now, though.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    86
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I lost sight of my visualization skills somewhere between being a child with an overactive imagination and a teenager that had to grow up, but I'm starting to track it down again. I used to have an almost hallucinogenic photographic memory.

    One thing I can suggest is to exercise more. Get your blood circulating better.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •