Art: What drawing books have genuinely helped you?

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  1. #1
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    What drawing books have genuinely helped you?

    I know people say drawing from life is the best practice, and I am talking to the people who have developed considerable skill in drawing. Still, there had to have been some books that helped you along the way. I'm not asking for the sake of a wanted list for my next trip to Borders. I'm asking out of curiosity.

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  3. #2
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    Loomis
    Bridgman
    Speed
    Peck

    Last edited by Elwell; January 14th, 2011 at 11:03 PM.

    Tristan Elwell
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    May I ask what their full names are? I only know Andrew Loomis.

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    George Bridgman
    Harold Speed
    Stephen Rogers Peck

    Last edited by Elwell; January 14th, 2011 at 11:04 PM.

    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
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    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
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  6. #5
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    studied from a book in school by Nicoliedeas (sp?), amazing drawing instruction. unfortunately i sold it long ago for gas money

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  7. #6
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    Robert Beverly Hale

    also, look for an english book with drawings by gottfried bammes (I don't know what it's called, but I think there's one with animals and one with humans. They're both good). He's written a book in german called "die gestalt des menschen", and the anatomy drawings in it are extremely explaintive, but unfortunately it is pretty expensive, are there's lots of useless text if you don't know german...

    eh, where were we?
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    one of these I have but the rest I would like to own in the future

    Robert Beverly Hale's Anatomy lessons from the great masters( Hale's other books as well)

    Harold Speed's The practice and science of drawing

    Rex Vicat Cole's Perspective for Artists: The Practice and Theory of Perspective As Applied to Pictures With a Section Dealing With Its Application to Architecture

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  9. #8
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    I used Bridgeman
    I also have the full set of Burne Hogarth books.
    Those are great for learning little tricks of the trade as it were, and also nice as reference pieces.

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    Hi, personally the one book that's helped me the most with my drawing was Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain by Betty Edwards. I bought that book over a year ago and it made my drawings a helluva lot better. I went from making self portraits that made me look like a monkey to something actually reasonable.

    Another book that helped me a lot was Figure Drawing for All its Worth by Andrew Loomis. That book really helped me with perspective and how to build a body from simpler forms. I still think that I can learn a lot from it.

    I don't have any examples from before I read Drawing on the RIght Side of the Brain, but I do have a self portrait made shortly after reading the book, and one made about 8 or 9 months after reading the book. Just to show you the kind of improvements made over time.
    Shortly after reading it:
    What drawing books have genuinely helped you?
    9 months after finishing:
    What drawing books have genuinely helped you?
    11 months after finishing:
    What drawing books have genuinely helped you?

    Although I still need to work on value, I think that book has helped me tremendously. I don't think I have any previous work around...but I assure you it was pretty bad

    Last edited by sula_nebouxi; March 22nd, 2005 at 12:26 PM.
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  11. #10
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    I agree with most above said books. the harold speed books, which are phenominal, are very sophisticated, and he talks alot about cereberal(sp?) concepts. If your just starting out, I'd pick em up to have them, but would probably hold off on reading them. Depending on where your at, skill wise, most of it might not make any sense. anyway...

    -tiny

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    harald speed's science and practice of drawing is the best I think. I don't think its hard to comprehend, but it does take a few readings to extract the nuances.

    The book mentioned about, nicholades, the natural way to draw. Is the best book I've seen. Its not fun to read, nor is it fun to look at, nor does the writing contain super enlightening words, but what it does is gives a schedule of practices enough for a whole year. It will take you through a whole bunch of excersise that will teach you how to see. I've seen both this and the drawing on the rightside of the brain, I'd suggust this one for the dedicated artist.

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