Pratt vs SVA ..Computer art program
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    Pratt vs SVA ..Computer art program

    hey guys,

    Im a senior, and i have benn accepted to both schools, the problem is that im having trouble distinguishing the diffrence between there computer art programs. I beleive that SVA has a better program, but pratt just gave me free money. Can someone help me. I choose the computer art program because i either want to design and make games, and or animated movies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by C0wjuice200
    I beleive that SVA has a better program, but pratt just gave me free money.
    What evidence do you have that SVA is better? Have you visited both schools and taken stock of the level and quality of work the students are doing at each school. The closer you look at each school, the easier it will be to make your decision. Pretend the free money doesn't exist for a while and make your decision based on your evaluation. The money will only confuse the issue.

    If it turns out that Pratt's program is 95% as good as SVA's then it may be worth taking the money to go there. If their program is only 50% to 75% as good as SVA's, then they are only trying to bribe students into their program and in that case the money wouldn't be worth it.

    Also keep in mind, what you get out of any program is what you put into it.

    Mark Hannon
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    Do as much research as you can. Definitely visit both schools, talk to as many people as possible. If you get an offer from one school, and you prefer the other, let them know money will be a deciding factor. If you're the sort of student they really want, they may match it.


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    well, I would say visit the schools, but try to get a feel for the people (other students) there more than the schools. Go to whatever school seems to have better art. I went to SCAD, and am a little sour about the "education" in computer art they offered me there. During my tour there at the end of high school, they bragged about constructing the biggest computer lab in the world, blah, blah, blah, best computer art course. What that means was they were pouring a lot of money into the program, but not really giving the best education. Most of the things I learned were either from other friends at the school, or self taught. Of course, the pressure to teach yourself is stronger when a teacher assigns a graded project, but not worth the thousands they ask for it. Your best bet is to concentrate on your art first and formost, and netwroking a very close second. the people you meet in school (especially the good ones) will most likely land a job right outside of school. If you don't have as good of a portfolio, then you may not get something right away. This is fine. Just keep working at it, if you are truly passionate about it, then you will feel guilty about not having work, and bust your ass to get something. That mentality will eventually land you something (unless you are just really bad, or an asshole). Here are some points of advice that I hope help you in your choice:

    1. Networking. I cannot stress how important this is. All the more easier if you are a genuine people person, and fairly likable. the easiest way to get a job in the computer art industry is to know someone, barring being amazing at your skill.

    2. look at your work from outside the box. no matter how bad your art is, the more you do it, the more that details you used to just start concentrating on will become second nature, leaving you to go even more in depth with your art. Do not just compare your art with those immediately around you. If it's anything like my school, you wont be hard pressed to be the best in class. Judge your art in comparison to actual art that out there on the market, rent games, spend hours just looking at environments, characters, textures and models. Its amazing how much you can pick up by just studying game art for a few hours. you will start to identify tricks and techniques.

    3. Dont feel guilty that you have no intense social life. Not to say all CGers are introverts, but the industry demands a lot out of you, and you may find that you simple dont have time to go out, drink at bars, lounge with friends, etc. If your passionate enough about what your doing, this wont really bother you too much. Try to combine the two. Do "work parties." Have some friends all bring their computers over, and just get some stuff done for a few hours. you will get the chance to see others workflow, and it will be constructive. I often feel guilty that Im not getting enough done when im just lounging around.

    4. keep yourself versatile. you can't just do characters. well, you can, but your crippling your chances of landing a job unless your really good. Do environments, dynamics, everyday objects.

    5. "speed work". Once you get your workflow down, try at first for small amounts of times (5-10 minutes) to work as fast as you can. If you can fly with the hotkeys and mouse functions, you will severaly cut your work time back.

    6. don't be an asshole. the industry is riddled with arrogance and pretention. dont be that guy. dont let praise get to you. You can always be better. If your a jerk, no one wants to work with you, and you will most likely have a harder struggle in the industry. When you go in for job interviews, people most importantly want to know if they would get along with you, and then, if you pass that, they will consider you for the job. If you come off in a wrong way, your most likely doomed to fail, no matter how good you are.

    well, I will post anymore things that I think of, but I hope this helps a lot. My school was kind of a dissapointing experience from a scholastic perspective, but the people i met during the whole ordeal, and what i learned from them and taught others i wouldnt trade for anything.

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    I really thank all of you guys for answering my question. i will definitly take all the answers into consideration

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    Hi Cowjuice,

    First of all, congratulations on being accepted to both of those art schools!

    I remember several years ago I was in the same situation you are in now - a senior in high school, and trying to determine whether to attend SVA or Pratt. Will you be able to visit the schools personally before making a final decision? I highly recommend you do if you can. As far as I know, both schools pretty much offer education equal in quality - the main difference between the schools however is their location.

    As you probably know, SVA is located in Manhattan, and Pratt is in Brooklyn. Their probably not more than 30 minutes apart on the subway, but it makes a world of difference in terms of living costs and conditions. I chose Pratt for this reason - larger facilities (it actually has a campus), and cheaper rent (they also offered more scholarship money than SVA - always helps). I studied fine arts at Pratt however, so my knowledge of both schools' computer art programs is limited. Again, it would be best if you could personally visit both schools and compare yourself.

    Hope this has helped you some, and best of luck in your decision!

    -Nick

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