best way to dry an oil painting...
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    best way to dry an oil painting...

    how should i dry my oil paintings if i want to dry it fast.
    i thought about using a hairdryer would work, but i'm not sure if it's totally a good idea. i need my painting to dry fast by the time it's done...i'm painting an oil painting for a friend as a birthday present. sincei have no money...this would be the best thing i could give her. so i'm starting the painting this weekend and i will try to finish it by the end of the week...and if i can't get it to dry in time, i need a way to dry it fast.

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    Originally Posted by creatix
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    well what kinda medium are you using, just pure lindseed or you got a drier in there to, theres a bunch of diffrent stuff you can do, but im no expert. sry.

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    Use Liquin or another alkyd type medium. Mix it straight up with your paint and use fairly thin coats and it should dry within 24 hours, if not then definitely 48.

    I've got other friends that put it in the stove at a low temperature for an hour or so, but I've never done that.

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    putting in your oven? wow, that's new...talk about polluting your house...
    i have linseed oil...crappy kind that came with a starter kit...
    eh, since i'm starting this weekend and have all next week...it should have enough time to dry the week after...

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    Originally Posted by creatix
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    Liquin or the like would be the simplest thing. More info here.


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    thanks for the tip, maybe i'll try the linseed oil i have or the hair dryer...i don't have money to go out and get that stuff you mentioned.

    Do you know the muffinman?

    Originally Posted by creatix
    Once you understand what the word "stupid" means - age is no longer a valid excuse for being that way.
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    the oven trick works fine, as long as you don't have a gas oven... 300-350 f, watch it.. takes about 10-15 minutes. hairdriers wont work, it only dries the very top layer and could crack it.

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    putting a painting in the oven is about the crazinest thing i've ever heard. tell me how it turns out.

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    i worry about that alot, i mean this painting is a very special gift for her that i'm making and if it burns to a crisp in the oven...who knows how large the force of hell will come out of my mouth...i mean would kill...this is something i'm making to keep our friendship going. she spent time with me on my birthday, so i'll return the favor with something special.

    p.s. i'll post the painting when it's finished.

    Do you know the muffinman?

    Originally Posted by creatix
    Once you understand what the word "stupid" means - age is no longer a valid excuse for being that way.
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    A kid in my illustration class put a painting in the oven. It turned it kinda brown colored. Our teacher was suprised that is didnt explode, she told the kid to never do it again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Faxtar
    A kid in my illustration class put a painting in the oven. It turned it kinda brown colored. Our teacher was suprised that is didnt explode, she told the kid to never do it again.
    thanx, i won't try that, hairdryer may be my best bet. or i'll just let it sit in the sun. besides i got two weeks...it's plenty of time, right?

    Do you know the muffinman?

    Originally Posted by creatix
    Once you understand what the word "stupid" means - age is no longer a valid excuse for being that way.
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    Don't use linseed oil, that's what makes the oil so slow dying in the first place. Liquin or any standard alkyd should do the trick. Painting thin helps a lot too. Thick applications of paint can take months or even years to dry completely.

    Can't say I've tried the oven thing, but it sounds like a real last ditch effort to me. If all else fails finish the painting so that you have something to show, but explain that it needs to dry before you can actually fork it over.

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    Quote Originally Posted by StrangeAlchemist
    Don't use linseed oil, that's what makes the oil so slow dying in the first place. Liquin or any standard alkyd should do the trick. Painting thin helps a lot too. Thick applications of paint can take months or even years to dry completely.

    Can't say I've tried the oven thing, but it sounds like a real last ditch effort to me. If all else fails finish the painting so that you have something to show, but explain that it needs to dry before you can actually fork it over.
    hmm, you serious about it taking months or years?
    yeah since oil is very moist and when dry it feels like rubber or plastic of some sort...i'm sure it will be dry enough after a week of drying, i don't really use thick amounts of oil paint. i conserve my paint...since i don't have alot of money and my parents don't really have the money to go out and buy me art supplies anytime...

    Do you know the muffinman?

    Originally Posted by creatix
    Once you understand what the word "stupid" means - age is no longer a valid excuse for being that way.
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    Liquin will significantly speed up the drying time. It should be readily available at most art stores. I don't think its good to try to accelerate the drying time with heat or sunlight. Paint thinly and keep in mind how much of each pigment you use as each one will have different drying rates. Cadmiums dry very slow. Cobalts pretty fast. Earth colors like siennas and umbers dry really fast. Ochres and Ultramarines are usually medium drying rate. Adding white to anything will slows down drying.

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    Hairdriers don't help at all. You could waste 3 hair driers and not get the damn painting to dry.


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    Maybe you should work with acrylics ?

    anyways= Well i would give the oven rather a try then the hairdryer <_< BUT be careful <_< !!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by corky13
    Maybe you should work with acrylics ?

    anyways= Well i would give the oven rather a try then the hairdryer <_< BUT be careful <_< !!!
    stop suggesting the oven trick, maybe i'll go to my local art store and see what i can get.

    Do you know the muffinman?

    Originally Posted by creatix
    Once you understand what the word "stupid" means - age is no longer a valid excuse for being that way.
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    try using alkyds..they are a fast drying oil paint...i've used them for class and the painting is usually dry by 24 hours

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    alkyds...hmm i'll look for that, how much is liquin or alkyd?

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    Originally Posted by creatix
    Once you understand what the word "stupid" means - age is no longer a valid excuse for being that way.
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    You can add a few drops of cobalt drier to your medium. Works well for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrr
    putting a painting in the oven is about the crazinest thing i've ever heard. tell me how it turns out.
    it's fine, I've done it a couple times. George Pratt told me about it, it has to be an electric oven, not gas... and you put it below 400... like 300-350f or so. I never left it in there for long, and I kept checking the painting to make sure it wasn't getting singed. I've only done it twice, but if you're in a pinch, it seems to work.

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    I would think you'd speed things up plenty with far less risk keeping it in the 200º range. Still, I've never done it myself and don't plan too any time soon.


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    Don't bother with the electric oven trick. Takes too long because you have to have it on such a low temperature and you must babysit it.

    Adding Cobalt or Japan Drier to your paints, even while using linseed oil will speed the drying considerably. Don't use too much though. Not only are those catalysts bad for you (fumes will bother you), but they can crack the painting over time. Since this is a gift and not a commercial painting, you'd be better off letting the paint dry naturally. Next best thing is just use a little of that cobalt or Japan drier. But please try to work in a well ventilated area.

    An alternative to the oven process is to place a light with a high wattage halogen bulb in front of the painting. I have had to do this many times for a painting to dry to meet a deadline. But like the oven process, you need to babysit it because you don't want to burn the painting or your house for that matter! Either way, it will take sevaral hours for your painting to dry and may warp depending on your painting surface.

    Speaking of surface, it depends what you are working on as well. For me, oils dry much faster on gessoed masonite and primed canvas than they do on gessoed illustration board.

    Good luck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by miracola
    Speaking of surface, it depends what you are working on as well. For me, oils dry much faster on gessoed masonite and primed canvas than they do on gessoed illustration board.

    Good luck!

    Miracola

    yeah gessoed illustration boards (fake canvas) suck.

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    Originally Posted by creatix
    Once you understand what the word "stupid" means - age is no longer a valid excuse for being that way.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MuffinMan
    yeah gessoed illustration boards (fake canvas) suck.
    oh, you mean canvas panel. I've never liked working on that. In fact I haven't since college. Yeah, it does suck.

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    Muffinman....have your paintings burst into flames yet? Or you've given up the oven method?

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    My Oven Story [contains spoilers].

    This has a happy ending.

    I very recently used my toaster oven with much success, I think a larger electric oven would work just as well for bigger pieces.

    So, here's my oven story (abridged).

    200ºF for 1 hour. ***Let the oven preheat!*** An hour might seem long, but it's better than 24-168.

    (Letting it preheat is very important because the increased infrared from the preheat process will burn anything quite quickly. Bright red coils = surefire danger of frying death.)


    Unabridged:
    Heat speeds up the curing process for the oils, also the less humidity the faster this process happens too. So I figured that the toaster oven was a damn good dry heat environment.

    I first tried it out at 100ºF for 20 min because that isn't outside natural heat range. This made them sticky, but didn't dry them. I saw no ill effects, though, so I turned it up to 150º for another 15 min. Same deal, tacked up a little more, but not dry to the touch. I set the oven for ~200ºF. Once up to temp, I put the pieces on a pan and slid them in on a mid-level rack and let 'em bake for 40 minutes. I went back to what I was doing, checking it occasionally. After letting them cool they were dry enough to touch with out any residue on my fingers, though they only felt the slightest bit tacky. The next day I was able to paint over them without any issues. Next time I'd be willing to try 250º.

    I had used Galkyd, Walnut Oil Alkyd Medium, and no medium at all separately in the various sections I needed to dry -- so all three things went in and out of the oven without adverse effects and all (both mediums and no medium) came out uniformly dry. While I haven't tried it with every additive on the planet, but these were all safe.

    Keep the area ventilated. I didn't notice any smells or fume feelings, but I just wanted to keep it on the safe side.

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    Anything you do to speed the drying of an oil painting will reduce its permanence. It needs the long, slow absorption of oxygen to form a proper bond. On the other hand, we're talking in centuries here, so if you're not painting the Mona Lisa...knock yourself out.

    I once used way, way too much Japan drier once and the painting eventually just fell off the canvas in brittle chunks.

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stoat View Post
    On the other hand, we're talking in centuries here, so if you're not painting the Mona Lisa...knock yourself out.
    Considering Leonardo's history of catastrophic paint failure (the Battle of Anghiari and the Last Supper both literally fell apart, and the Virgin of the Flowers has terrible wrinkling), maybe not the best example...


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    Wish this was a smart-assed comment, but...

    1. Flame thrower, on maximum setting.

    2. Start over with acrylics.

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