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  1. #1
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    Please help me with Value!

    Name:  Courtyard Comp Value.jpg
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    Hello! I am currently working on my first environment concept, which also happens to be my first full dive into digital painting. I am struggling a bit with blocking in value. My biggest issue is figuring out the cast shadows, especially from the building structures. If anybody has any tips or advice it would really be appreciated. I started with piece with laying everything out with a line drawing which I have posted below. Please also feel free to comment on the composition or any other aspects of the piece. Thank you!

    Name:  Courtyard Comp.jpg
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  3. #2
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    Squint while looking at your reference. Use a big brush and block in the large value shapes. Make sure to compare these shapes to each other.
    Most importantly, WORK SLOWLY and accept that your first few tries will be wrong.
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  4. #3
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    Hello there!
    I think your issue isn't so much with values, as with the basic concepts of (digital) painting. It will take a while and a lot of practice to get comfortable with the medium. The biggest thing I see is for you to adjust your point of view. you're right in defining your goal as blocking in the values. But you have only a few areas where you really dared to work in big shapes. A lot of your image still consists of scribbly lines - more drawing than painting. All of these lines need to get exchanged against shapes. As Scribbly said before - use big brushes. Maybe also zoom out more and/or use a smaller image resolution. The less chances you give yourself to think about details instead of the big image, the better it might be.

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