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  1. #1
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    May i have your critique?

    I'm a learning artist, and recently i found that most of the anatomy i draw usually looks weird, i don't know it's like something seems off. I decided to start studying poses so i can overcome this struggle. Here are 2 poses i did today, hope you can help me!
    Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #2
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    Your proportions look pretty good, but the placement of the main forms in space need some work. I've found the best way to practice this is to draw simple 3D shapes in perspective, then in relation to each other. Drawabox.com has some good exercises regarding this, take your time - it isn't easy. Also check out Proko on youtube, he explains how to simplify the figure in to basic forms very well.

    For example, your second figure has a few things that stand out to straight away. Her left upper arm is far too short, the angle of her head looks flat - think of it as a cube and compare it to the horizon line. In this case, you're looking down on the figure, so you should see more of the top of her head, now her face looks too long/stretched out. Her right hand is too small so it looks like it's withdrawing back in to space. The bottom of her legs look too big, so they're doing the opposite and look like they're coming forward in to space. Once you can pose the figure in correct perspective with basic forms, things will start to look less 'weird' - then you can start and studying anatomy more in depth, try not to get caught up in the details of all those muscles and tendons we have. That can come later.

    You can also play around with line weight to emphasis how forms are placed in perspective. Generally heavier line weight will make shapes 'pop out' at the viewer and look closer while a thinner line weight will push shapes back and look farther away. Always remember to slow down and pay attention, speed comes later.

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  5. #3
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    Simplify ,use Boxes , i recommend you to focus on big shapes, rib cage, craneum,hips, etc .

    Personally this video helped me a lot with that:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEKMHFdA5dQ

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