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  1. #1
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    ro5ert - Composition 1.1

    Name:  01_tepper detail.png
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    I'm taking this studies as a chance to learn to paint digitally.
    This was my first try, using black and a white with opacity modulated with the stylus pressure. It felt like playing with a new toy and proves that even if one has no idea of how to do it, it still can be fun. After finishing it, I realized that having some intermediate values (other then black and white) would have been a Great idea.

    The original is Saul Tepper. So I realized that he used the same value for the face shadows on both figures, with almost nothing to be seen on those masses of shadow. I'm still not sure if there is something actually painted to suggest the mans' eyes, or is just my brain tricking me into seeing it.

    It took me more then 1 hour. I'm sure to be doing something wrong with the stylus settings, and getting the values modulated through pressure is probably not the way to go. I plan to check the contrl paint lessons soon.
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  3. #2
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    Study of C. Duran by JS Sargent. Used a 7 values grayscale, plus adjust of size, force and hardness. Very different from my black + white values previous study. I'm nowhere close to the 30min study, but I just had to see how far could I push this media.
    For this one I'll point out Repetition:
    - lots of "V" and "^" shapes, the face, beard, lapel of jacket, bent arms, legs (even if barely noticeable on this rendering),
    - texture on folds on cuffs, hand, jacket handkerchief, "tie". And all leading to the face with the "^" shape

    While doing this I was surprised to see how much sense Sargent brush strokes made, and how easy was to follow *most of* them.
    PS. after the practice with shading and tonal values that I got with #3, I felt that this one - Sargent's mentor- deserved a second pass on face/ eyes. I don't regret it (original might be still on my sketchbook).

  4. #3
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    Name:  Lefebvre_Jules_Mary_Magdalene_In_The_Cave_exerc3.png
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    It is starting to feel like painting! Very different from the "carving on tablet with a plastic nib" of #1. I'll add analysis soon (Repetition'/ continuity ...)

  5. #4
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    Wow I like the progress that you are making with each painting that you do keep up the good work. The only things that I can point out is for you not to forget to add a "defining line" using a hard brush. For instance if you look at your third image of the woman lying down, you could define her edges a bit to contrast her from the background so that she does not sort of start to bleed into the background (like if you sharpened the edges of her from fingers to her foot). Also be careful going too dark in some areas like in your second image the background color is a lot darker and you loose detail in his hair being contrasted to the background. In the same way you using a lot of dark's in your third image which loose a bit of detail in the mountains in the background.
    All in all though you are really improving, good job!!! I like your idea of using a pallet of 8 grey swatches which I am planning on using myself because shading is kicking my ass right now.

  6. #5
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    Thanks for the review! I see what you mean about the soft edges, I definitely needed harder lines on shoulder against dark shaded face, and edge of bent leg against the other leg. The mountains lost all details as you say. The background on #2 was hard, I was trying to get the grainy, lighter texture over the darker background. But I still have no idea how to get it done, right now It's just one standard oil brush (gimp oil 01) and fiddling with hardness, strength and size. No layers or fancy techniques. And I just started my 4th digital painting!

  7. #6
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    Great progress so far. You don't really any digital trickery if you don't want to, it is also better for learning wise IMO. How much you squint as it might help seeing values more simple as original is more subtle. Also try to find right size of brush for job as well keep eye on direction of brush stroke as it helps with mark making as well textures, but in end its not about forgery, I think its mainly learning composition, but you know us, we really like to push you further

  8. #7
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    Thanks stonec! I try to squint or zoom -a lot-out to keep my values in check, and it was hard to get smooth transitions of values on the beginning. I didn't want to use fancy digital tools that would not translate to my analog paintings (like linear gradients, layers or even airbrush). For now I settled with very large brushes and light pressure/force to get those gradients. I'm close to finish the next study, not at all easier and hopefully due to being a Ruben's. I've tried to keep in mind what you said about direction of brush strokes and size of brush.
    I'm afraid that the way this composition 1.1 exercises are set lead to an army of potential forgers: side by side painting, art that you like, get everything as close as you can to original...
    Not complaining, and indeed I'm using it to improve my painting skills (digital and analog), along with composition.
    Thanks for pushing! : )
    Last edited by ro5ert; 2 Weeks Ago at 05:19 AM.

  9. #8
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    Name:  04_Peter_Paul_Rubens_-_Two_Satyrs.jpg
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    Two satyrs by Peter Paul Rubens. I'll choose continuity and movement for this one: from any of the two main focal points that are the hand and the eyes of the foremost satyr, one is pulled on a circular motion from eyes to his left shoulder, then down to hand, up through leafs and dripping water, and back to eyes. Along the way lots of details with strong contrasts to hold the viewer on this endless circular motion. Further movement is is induced on the viewer that will try to understand the two sides of the satyr's face: the human disguise on one side and the dark beast on the other.
    Last edited by ro5ert; 1 Week Ago at 06:50 PM.

  10. #9
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    Wow dude, I actually have no critique at this moment just wanted to say that you are improving a lot. You said you had trouble with the eyes before but I see that your eyes here as well as your line work and shading have leveled up big time. If I had to really REALLY pick something out right now I would say that your transitions from dark to light could be improved. For instance the character at the back, the details on the bowl they are drinking from. But that could be remedied by using the color picker tool while drawing (not sure if that is the best way to do it but it works for me)
    Making me feel ashamed that I have not posted anything of my own. Your progress is inspiring, good job and keep going. With that being said I have to step up.

  11. #10
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    Hey Sean, thanks for the support! This one took me a long time, the level and cheer variety of details are at a different level the the previous studies. At some point I was thinking to simply skip all detail on the character at the back, eventually I did it, but as you pointed out the contrast and dark values are at some places a bit too much, competing with the foreground character. I should have increased the number of grey scale values, but I just wanted to get it finished. Color picker is definitely an efficient tool, but I think we'll learn more by not using it or only to define the initial palette (the grey scale swatches) and then train our eyes to choose the values right. I'm curious to see what you'll choose next! I think I'll try something simpler for my next study.
    Last edited by ro5ert; 1 Week Ago at 04:49 AM.

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