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  1. #1
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    Trying to draw in a standard "pretty" style...

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    This is my friend's OC and I was drawing him as a Christmas gift. I wasn't really given a reference beyond looking up "Leo Savdraws" on deviant art and using those. I thought this was turning out well, but everyone else says its sucks, so can you guys help me improve? I'm not sure where I went wrong. Maybe tips on how to do hair better would be helpful. Thank you so much!


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  3. #2
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    Seems ok for anime.
    My commentary is a gift to you.

  4. #3
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    Thank you, but do you have any advice for pushing it from okay to good?

  5. #4
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    I suggest adding a little more contrast...
    Grinnikend door het leven...

    Sketchbook Blog

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  7. #5
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    Do you mean like adding darker colors or cooler colors or both? Thanks so much!

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    Name:  130.jpg
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    Thank you to those who helped!! I added more contrast. I think I'm done at this point.

  9. #7
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    Take a look Eugene Carriere if you like soft "calm mood" pieces and look where is contrasts of darkest darks and lightest lights (value) or focal point even Rembrandt has made those kind of painting

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  11. #8
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    Always construct the head beforehand, using either loomis method or whatever you think works best for your style. And then, plan ahead the rendering and values before starting to color. From the looks, you don't really understand how the head's forms are sculpted, based on light and shadow. That being said, contrast isn't the issue here. Actually, if you want to create very colorful pictures, low contrast can work in your favour. This requires some advanced understanding though. Basically, to make colorful pictures work, you need more than high saturations and flashy tones. The more color dominates aspects like composition or rendering, the more it stands out in a positive way. Also, all colors can work in combination, as long as you know how to balance them. A common method is, to decide for 2 "main" hues that are connected / very close on the color wheel (like green and yellow, or blue and pink), and set accents by using an antagonizing tone, like comlementary color. That being said, confronting colors shouldn't be distributed in a 50/50 ratio, if you want them to stand out, because by doing so, they cancel each other out. This is also, why I personally don't like to use complementary colors for light and shadow.

    Other things to consider: Reflective/ bouncing light. Especially with high saturations, this is important to bring them together. Basically, high saturated and reflective surfaces bounce off their own colors to other objects. In your case, this can be the shirt and hair against the skin. Don't overdo this though. Another way of bringing colors together, is by adding a common hue into all shadows. This would be called "ambient light". If you define a background color for your portrait, use it as your ambient light. Also, there is little consequence in adding too much ambient light color into your shadows, making it a more approachable method for bringing colors together.

    I've added an example below, can't really call it an "overdrawing" at this point, because I completely overhauled your portrait, but I hope it gets some of my points across.

    Name:  prettyboy.jpg
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  13. #9
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    Wow, thank you so much for the indepth explanation! I'll be sure to do more studies of how light interacts with the body. I wish I could have given my friend your portrait instead of mine, haha

    I do have a question about ambient light. I've always struggled to understand how it works. Does it affect everything in the image by adding a similar tone or does it just affect the shadows? And how would I determine what color of ambient light works best?

    Thank you so much again! Your advice was a wonderful Christmas gift.

  14. #10
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    Haha yw.

    If I tell you how ambient light works, it'd be easy to take away the wrong things and come to some bad conclusions. The thing is, we draw stuff how we see as humans, with our human visual perception. Our eyes adjust to light and color stimulation, and then we only "see" what our brain makes of the visual information, that our eyes receive.

    Basically, you should treat ambient light as if it only affected shadows. Mind you, ambient light is just a mash of all colors that are bouncing around in the area, so if you draw a portrait with a background color, that'd identify as your ambient light as well. So what color you chose, just depends on what palette you want to go for, possibly taking my previous suggestions on color combinations into account.

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