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  1. #1
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    I want to produce digital art. Is it ok to skip traditional painting?

    According to the founder of ctrlpaint.com, the best results came from confident traditional artists although he didn't do much of traditional painting.

    I plan to buy a pen display such as iPad (Pro) or Cintiq after learning fundamentals of drawing but before learning to paint colors.

    Would it be ok to skip traditional painting and go straight to digital color painting if I had fundamentals of drawing?
    Also, which one between iPad (Pro) and Cintiq would you recommend for learning and production?


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  3. #2
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    Personally, I believe the biggest advantage of traditional artists is that they grew up in a world where hard work and discipline were common, while the market was relatively kind, without the insane competition we see nowadays, so they made a fair chance of getting professional. School was harsh, reality was kind.

    I don't think there is anything magical in a tube of oils that makes you get good faster (okay, turpentine is the exception here, if you sniff enough of it you will feel like Van Gogh). There are a number of pitfalls in digital art, though: do not use tools like the eraser or colour picker to sample colours from reference. I do believe it is beneficial to mix colours from a palette, starting from, say, three primaries, and taking samples from these, to mix new colours. This works in digital art as in traditional.

    The main difference between iPad and Cintiq is that Apple is still vague about the pressure sensitivity of its stylus, and that iPad doesn't run professional grade software like Photoshop. That doesn't hurt your learning curve, but in production it will be a disadvantage.
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  4. #3
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    The principles you might learn from traditional painting are what would be useful and transferable, but might as well learn on the medium you actually want to use.

  5. #4
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    Basically share the opinions, although @eezacque there are less unhealthy ways, with way more magix to become Van Gogh.
    I even recommend drawing pixelart, it helped me a LOT with getting better at using colors, and in general, with understanding what defines how we interprete content in pictures. For me, one big problem with digital art was always the resolution and detail I was working in. This isn't a problem with most analog forms, but when you start drawing digitally, I started overanalyzing pixels. I had to unlearn this, but also by drawing pixelart, I could actually learn HOW to unlearn it, by setting the right values in the right spots.

  6. #5
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    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...itional-paints
    I'm with Eezacque and White Rabbit on this but I think you should at least try traditional, you don't know what awaits you if you don't every medium acts differently and can do different things better than another plus it makes you think more before you act as its harder to cover your mistakes like you can do with digital using layers, undo's etc.
    Last edited by stonec; 4 Weeks Ago at 10:43 PM.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by eezacque View Post
    The main difference between iPad and Cintiq is that Apple is still vague about the pressure sensitivity of its stylus, and that iPad doesn't run professional grade software like Photoshop. That doesn't hurt your learning curve, but in production it will be a disadvantage.
    It seems that people say Cintiq is better for production and iPad (Pro) is better for portability. After learning fundamentals of drawing, will I not need portability as much as I do now? One of the goals is to not be dependent on mobility for production of digital art. In my theory, I won't need portability by the time I'm ready to learn colors.

    If I had money, I'd buy both cintiq and iPad Pro. But, at this point, I don't have enough money to buy both.

  8. #7
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    I suggest you keep sketching for the rest of your life, for which portability is essential. However, a paper sketchbook will do...
    Grinnikend door het leven...

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  9. #8
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    Um. . . isn't Photoshop CC coming to the iPad in 2019? Although, I don't know what to think about the subscription model I guess there's an advantage in being able to work on a piece on different devices.
    "No one escapes unhappiness."

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by xtal View Post
    Um. . . isn't Photoshop CC coming to the iPad in 2019? Although, I don't know what to think about the subscription model I guess there's an advantage in being able to work on a piece on different devices.
    The iPad soesn't have the resources, aka memory and disk, to do anything decent with a future Photoshop implementation.
    Grinnikend door het leven...

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  11. #10
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    I can see the benefits of Cintiq.

    One benefit of iPad (Pro) is that if I wanted to save sketches as digital files, iPad (Pro) might be good. Perhaps, I will buy iPad in the future since I don't like to use a scanner or my smartphone camera, and iPad is good enough for sketching and a bit of painting although iPad has parallax to a slight degree.

    What is iPad (Pro) good for in terms of digital art other than replacing a scanner and a sketchbook?
    Last edited by tokigami.kineko; 4 Weeks Ago at 07:06 PM.

  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by eezacque View Post
    The iPad soesn't have the resources, aka memory and disk, to do anything decent with a future Photoshop implementation.
    The articles I came across didn't differentiate between the iPad and the Pro. Or maybe they were just using "iPad" as a generic term.
    "No one escapes unhappiness."

  13. #12
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    I do both traditional media and digital. Have done this for many decades. When digital art first came on the scene most artists had been trained in some traditional school or other, they took their abstract essential skills in composition, concept, color theory and so forth into the digital work. I certainly did that and it served me well enough. It is critical to know these things and I think it is critical to be able to draw as well. Nowadays there may be studies or schools that are strictly digital with this basic content and agenda. So you may not need to learn to use 'traditional' art media but you cannot avoid the basics taught that lie beneath any good artwork. Sometimes you learn these basics just in order to consciously ignore them - and that too is what art is about. ( ie: Kandinsky ) I've used painter some in the past but am not really up to date on software now. for 3D abstract work I've used Cinema 4D which serves as my architectural software as well. I understand that the free soft for painting called Krita is a good start. The painting here might as well be done in traditional media or something very like it in digital - Painter for example - if that's what might be wanted. This one is acrylic/mixed media. Name:  CURVING BACK acrylic-mixed media on panel .jpg
Views: 239
Size:  87.8 KB Best of luck to you.
    Last edited by Corralesartist; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:23 PM.

  14. #13
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    I do both traditional media and digital. . Have done this for many decades. When digital art first came on the scene most artists had been trained in some traditional school or other, they took their skills in composition, concept, color theory and so forth into the digital work. I certainly did that and it served me well enough. It is critical to know these things and I think it is critical to be able to draw as well. Nowadays there may be studies or schools that are strictly digital with this content and agenda. So you may not need to learn to use 'traditional' art media but you cannot avoid the basics taught that lie beneath any good artwork. Sometimes you learn these basics just in order to consciously ignore them - and that too is what art is about. ( ie: Kandinsky ) I've used painter some in the past but am not really up to date on software now. for 3D abstract work I've used Cinema 4D which serves as my architectural software as well. I understand that the free soft for painting called Krita is a good start. Something like the the painting below might easily be done in digital if that's what is wanted. It is acrylic / mixed media.

  15. #14
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    Nice painting. I think when I should buy a digital pen display depends on my skill. When my technical drawing skill is poor, it's a good idea to just go cheap and easy and draw on paper with pen. For a beginner, creativity better be cheap and easy. It's a bad idea for a beginner to make creativity precious and expensive by buying an expensive pen display like iPad Pro and Wacom Cintiq.

    When I'm ready to draw semi-profesionally or ready to learn colors, I will buy wacom cintiq or just a cheap iPad device.

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