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  1. #1
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    How do you draw like this?

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    I've been practicing art for some time. I've read you should learn "the basics" first and then you can draw whatever you want. So I practice the basics: I read books about human anatomy, about oil painting, art theory, I draw still lifes and portraits, I go to drawing sessions with a model. I draw, I practice. I can copy things realisticaly. But when I try to draw something like the images that I posted, I find it impossible. I try to draw people doing something dynamic and I find it impossible. The drawing ends up disproportionate, and I don't know how the parts of the body look when the it is performing certain action, and how everything looks from certain point of view (three quarters, from above, from below, etc.)

    Let's also say that I want to draw wagons, carriages, buidlings, locations, like in the images I posted. I've been learning "the basics" for some time, but it looks like drawing locations was never part of "the basics", so when I try to draw locations in whatever proyect I want to make, it's impossible for me to draw them, so I feel everything I've been practicing is useless, or it isn't useful for the kind of art/illustration I want to make (which are comics like the ones I posted above).

    You might say "use references"! That might help, but there are comic artists like jim lee that can draw amazing stuff withouth looking at anything. How do you get that ability? What kind of exercises, or training do you need to draw like that? To draw the human figure realisticaly from any angle withouth looking at reference? Not only that, but to also paint it reallisticaly.

    I ask this because I feel lost, and whatever I practice seems to be usefull for certain type of art, but not for the art I want to make. There must be some kind of guideline to end up drawing like I want.


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  4. #2
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    Copying what you see is only the first step, learning the structure of things like the human body is next.


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  6. #3
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    drawing basic are
    - proportion : knowing the proportions of the subject , know how to measure to check for proportion
    - perspective : drawing how to draw a cube 80% correct is enough, you can build everything up with some decently correct pers guideline. Check out Krenz Cushart for some practical perspective drawing. Or use 3D base as crutch if you cannot do this for the life of you.
    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/438045501240751902/
    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/495466396497503875/

    Everything else is just details that you learn through researching the subject mater .

  7. #4
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    How about showing us some of your work, aka starting a sketchbook. You can copy things realistically, so I suggest using references, which will make you build a visual library, which will eventually help you to draw from imagination.
    Grinnikend door het leven...

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  9. #5
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    Some of these artists you've listed have been drawing for decades, I'd assume. So the short answer is "a long time of dedicated practice". Showing us your own work would be helpful!

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  11. #6
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    What is it about that art that draws you? There's a crap-ton of people on dA who attempt to draw/paint in that style but they have no grasp of the foundations of it. They are, for the most part, just blindly copying what they see. Break down what it is that you find interesting. Otherwise you run the risk of being dismissed as just another "fan artist."

    At any rate, I'm pretty sure those buildings were not drawn by the artist. No manga/manhwa has the time to draw buildings to that level of detail. You can buy scenes of towns, cities, forests, etc. from all angles on shading film (Deleter is one brand). Compare the buildings from the middle panel to the one on the bottom. . . the middle panel the character is floating over a tallish buildings with mostly flat roofs, then is shown over a street scene of mostly peaked roofs. That inconsistency makes me think the buildings were bought not hand drawn.

    Jim Lee was born in 1964 and I would guess he put in a ton of time in honing his craft to get where he is now. Start out working hard and then figure out where you can work smart.
    "No one escapes unhappiness."

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  13. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by eezacque View Post
    How about showing us some of your work, aka starting a sketchbook. You can copy things realistically, so I suggest using references, which will make you build a visual library, which will eventually help you to draw from imagination.
    Quote Originally Posted by MattyT View Post
    Some of these artists you've listed have been drawing for decades, I'd assume. So the short answer is "a long time of dedicated practice". Showing us your own work would be helpful!

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    This is a still life I made some time ago. The composition and background could be better.

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    This is a copy I did of a painting of Anders Zorn, we were studying Zorn's pallete in painting class.

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    These are pencil drawings I did sometime ago. The first ones are eye drawings I copied from vanderpoel's human anatomy book. The second ones are drawings I did from imagination.

    Quote Originally Posted by xtal View Post
    What is it about that art that draws you? There's a crap-ton of people on dA who attempt to draw/paint in that style but they have no grasp of the foundations of it. They are, for the most part, just blindly copying what they see. Break down what it is that you find interesting. Otherwise you run the risk of being dismissed as just another "fan artist."

    At any rate, I'm pretty sure those buildings were not drawn by the artist. No manga/manhwa has the time to draw buildings to that level of detail. You can buy scenes of towns, cities, forests, etc. from all angles on shading film (Deleter is one brand). Compare the buildings from the middle panel to the one on the bottom. . . the middle panel the character is floating over a tallish buildings with mostly flat roofs, then is shown over a street scene of mostly peaked roofs. That inconsistency makes me think the buildings were bought not hand drawn.

    Jim Lee was born in 1964 and I would guess he put in a ton of time in honing his craft to get where he is now. Start out working hard and then figure out where you can work smart.
    I think this is the most useful art advice I’ve read in months. Or years. and you are correct: the buildings are different on each pannel.

    I guess I’ll just have to read, practice, work smart, and be patient. There’s no magic formula for becoming an artist.

  14. #8
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    I don't think you're at a stage where you can copy things realistically, so I suggest you do a lot more still lifes, for now. As for drawing you could benefit from the exercises in http://www.drawabox.com
    Grinnikend door het leven...

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  15. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by eezacque View Post
    I don't think you're at a stage where you can copy things realistically-
    I don't necessarily agree with that, not in terms of your [ Cortazar ] technical skill. Painting copies aren't for making replicas, you do them to try and learn about the original artist's mindset. Keep doing them, not with the mindset that you'll perfectly replicate every line, but to understand why the artist made the decisions they did.

    THAT SAID, I do agree with needing more still-life practice.

  16. #10
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    Don't just do studies, apply those for you own work as well and study things for your problem areas

  17. #11
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    Glad it was useful. I've worked in that style myself and researched a lot to try to understand how the artists worked (techniques, tools, etc.). I got into watercolors because most of the Japanese artists I admired used them. Also, I have a catalog of Deleter products (and some of the shading/scenery films) so I know what they offer (and I would totally use the pre-rendered city scenes because I'm lazy). The manga/manhwa artists are under tremendous pressure to produce and not all of them can afford an army of assistants, so if there's a way to get it done faster they're going to use it.

    In my experience, however, the most useful thing was life drawing. I'm not sure it's possible to stylize the human figure convincingly if you don't understand correct anatomy and proportion. I never seemed to be able to be able to get those exercises, breaking down the figure into shapes, to work for me. The real trick is finding what works for you, keeping in mind how muscle memory works and knowing when what you are practicing isn't getting you where you want to go. It's hard to undo bad habits.
    "No one escapes unhappiness."

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