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  1. #1
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    Learning to write vs learning to draw?

    Writing relies on fine motor skills, involving the muscles of fingers, hand and wrist, while drawing relies on bigger muscles, in elbow and shoulder. When children learn to write, their finer motor skills need to be developed.

    I wonder if it is counter-productive to teach kids to draw correctly, while they are supposed to pick up fine motor skills. Do the two interfere? Any thoughts on this, preferably from teachers involved in teaching young kids to write?
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  3. #2
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    You get better at what you do repeatedly. A child who is taught to draw from the elbow/shoulder and doesn't practice writing won't get good at writing quickly and vice versa, but only because practice is lacking. If the child practices both drawing from the elbow and writing, I know of no mechanism that would interfere with either of the motor skills- fine and broad Motor skills are not mutually exclusive.

    Interstingly, writing teachers of past centuries would have said that good handwriting is also done from shoulder/elbow, but nobody writes in spencerian script anymore, sadly

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  5. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benedikt View Post
    Interstingly, writing teachers of past centuries would have said that good handwriting is also done from shoulder/elbow, but nobody writes in spencerian script anymore, sadly
    Wondering why don't anybody teach like it anymore??? How it actually affects if they don't practice fine motor skills, where people clumsier back then but actually here in schools they don't teach much of handwriting anymore

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    That's a good question, actually. I don't know. I suppose handwriting styles changed from exclusively cursive to mainly printed letters with the advent of typewriters- you can't write printed Letters from the elbow. techniques of penmanship were lost along the way even though we still teach cursive handwriting in school.

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    Not directly related, but the type of handwriting I was taught, slanted, connected, was designed for writing with nib and ink, and still taught when the days of nib ad ink, and school benches with built in ink pot, were long over.
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    So that's why they have been phasing out handwriting in here like if you don't need something in working life https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...skills-finland probably only time will tell if its good or bad

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  10. #7
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    I don't know what I think of ditching cursive- it seems a shame but on the other hand we're not teaching the correct technique and most of the kids will drop curive and write printed letters as soon as they are allowed to.

    Replacing writing itself with typing though is asinine. Kids still have to learn how to write. They're not born with the ability to write in printed letters either.

    My hunch is parents who care will step in and teach their kids how to write on their own. It doesn't bode well for the rest. I wonder if tests in Finland are also done by typing on keyboards? I would think not. What a time to be alive (as a kid).

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    Dunno which one they use for tests as I don't have kids but you have to still sign passport and ID so that's why they keep handwriting. People's signatures are going to be less individual and its shame, I do write by hand when I'm looking lecture of some sort and it helps me to remember better and I have my notes which I can refer later in needed. I'm wondering when there is black out, you need to write or keep track of something, how can you do it if you don't know how to use pen?

  12. #9
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    Hmm, it seems like kids who want to draw start long before learning to write. So I guess they're born with the desire to hold something and make marks with it. I'm not sure learning to draw well and learning to write would interfere with each other. Cursive writing teaches you to make a variety of marks quickly and I think that's useful in drawing, regardless of the muscles involved. I don't know if they teach writing kanji by hand in Japan anymore, but basically it's a lot of tiny pictures where the lines have to be made in a certain order and each stroke has a certain weight. For example, the kanji for rain looks like a window with raindrops on it. Can't help but feel they have a head start in the drawing department. It might be interesting to compare artists who learned cursive with those who didn't.

    They taught penmanship/cursive in the 4th grade when I was in school. They had templates with the correct form printed on plastic to place over your writing to see how close you got and where you needed to improve. People's signatures have already gotten less distinctive, most seem to barely get the first letter out and then scrawl the rest. I'm surprised they are teaching students to type in Finland. Teachers in the US had to tell the students not to use netspeak when writing essays. Or at least, they used to. Maybe they don't care about that anymore, either.
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