Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    834
    Thanks
    748
    Thanked 405 Times in 309 Posts

    Can Cold Wax medium self-ignite?

    I bought a pot of this wax in white spirits a few days ago.
    http://www.atlantisart.co.uk/spectru...-white-spirit/

    Now, the pot comes with a lot more warning labels than I expected, the purpose is to try it out as varnish for watercolor and acrylic paintings as I've seen some people do. They put this medium with their bare hands and indoor. I did some internet research but managed to get a bit confused.
    So questions:
    How long before a painting becomes "safe" for indoor storage when I smoke inside but the vapors are flamable?
    I read somewhere that it can ignite over a temperature of maybe as low as 45-ish degrees celsius, and it's gonna be super warm next week. Like, do I put the jar in some ice water during the day?
    Also, will this thing damage paper when it hasn't been treated with anything else than what the companies put in the watercolor papers?

    ...And if all this is flamable and toxic, how do I dispose of/store sponges and fabric used for applying this stuff to the painting when I don't have a metal jar? Like, I found this thing where it says that the rags should fully dry and then they won't ignite, but can they be bundled up after that?

    https://www.thespruce.com/safely-dis...e-rags-4125743


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    3,406
    Thanks
    306
    Thanked 1,282 Times in 1,018 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Trixtar View Post
    I bought a pot of this wax in white spirits a few days ago.
    http://www.atlantisart.co.uk/spectru...-white-spirit/

    Now, the pot comes with a lot more warning labels than I expected, the purpose is to try it out as varnish for watercolor and acrylic paintings as I've seen some people do. They put this medium with their bare hands and indoor. I did some internet research but managed to get a bit confused.
    It doesn't look like something I would use as varnish. Watercolor needs no varnish, and standard varnish for acrylics is a lot safer for use.

    So questions:
    How long before a painting becomes "safe" for indoor storage when I smoke inside but the vapors are flamable?
    I read somewhere that it can ignite over a temperature of maybe as low as 45-ish degrees celsius, and it's gonna be super warm next week. Like, do I put the jar in some ice water during the day?
    I think it suffices to keep the jar tightly closed, so the stuff doesn't vaporise and has no access to oxygen.

    Also, will this thing damage paper when it hasn't been treated with anything else than what the companies put in the watercolor papers?
    My first question is how extremely vulnerable watercolor will survive this potion.

    ...And if all this is flamable and toxic, how do I dispose of/store sponges and fabric used for applying this stuff to the painting when I don't have a metal jar? Like, I found this thing where it says that the rags should fully dry and then they won't ignite, but can they be bundled up after that?

    https://www.thespruce.com/safely-dis...e-rags-4125743
    The link mentions oily rags, which are an entirely different animal, as oil will oxidate, a chemical reaction which produces warmth, which may cause fire when allowed to build up in rags.

    Here is my advice. I strongly advise you not to use this substance for varnishing paintings. For all other questions regarding the safety of this product, consult the manufacturer!
    Grinnikend door het leven...

    Sketchbook Blog

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to eezacque For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    1,769
    Thanks
    291
    Thanked 522 Times in 435 Posts
    Watercolor is pretty fragile to begin with if you wanna preserve painting then it need to be putted underclass. With quick search found this https://www.goldenpaints.com/technic...varnwatercolor so I wouldn't bother with it if you lose that watercolor effect

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to stonec For This Useful Post:


  7. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    834
    Thanks
    748
    Thanked 405 Times in 309 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by eezacque View Post

    Here is my advice. I strongly advise you not to use this substance for varnishing paintings. For all other questions regarding the safety of this product, consult the manufacturer!
    Thank you very much for your reply
    I actually just got back from the trash-place where it got safely placed at the chemical-thing.... It just got too complicated to mess with.
    Before that I went back and took a look at that Dorland's Wax that others use. That does come in a plastic container, so I guess it is two completely different wax mediums, I just thought it was the same?

    I would like to find a way to varnish watercolours so they can be glued to a board, but guess I'll just keep searching then

  8. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    834
    Thanks
    748
    Thanked 405 Times in 309 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by stonec View Post
    Watercolor is pretty fragile to begin with if you wanna preserve painting then it need to be putted underclass. With quick search found this https://www.goldenpaints.com/technic...varnwatercolor so I wouldn't bother with it if you lose that watercolor effect
    Thank you for the input. The point with a wax-varnish was to make the paper water-repelling. Like this
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oDy7Nzg2rQo

  9. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    London
    Posts
    13,899
    Thanks
    4,206
    Thanked 6,674 Times in 4,587 Posts
    If it's wax, it'll pick up dirt and you won't be able to clean it. Water colours have lasted centuries without it.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to Black Spot For This Useful Post:


  11. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    834
    Thanks
    748
    Thanked 405 Times in 309 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Black Spot View Post
    If it's wax, it'll pick up dirt and you won't be able to clean it. Water colours have lasted centuries without it.
    Oh I thought it would be much easier to clean and preserve with wax varnish. Thank you for the input, I guess from now on, I'll just do as I've always done and go without it

  12. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 9 Times in 6 Posts
    They make masonite panels with a ground suitable for watercolor painting on it. You could probably varnish that, but I'd recommend a spray just to avoid disturbing the paint (done outside with a respirator). That wax stuff is made for oil paints. I'd only trust something like that with lab testing and I haven't found any resources for that (the Wet Canvas forum doesn't count).
    "A pig that doesn't fly is just a pig."

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to xtal For This Useful Post:


  14. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    834
    Thanks
    748
    Thanked 405 Times in 309 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by xtal View Post
    They make masonite panels with a ground suitable for watercolor painting on it. You could probably varnish that, but I'd recommend a spray just to avoid disturbing the paint (done outside with a respirator). That wax stuff is made for oil paints. I'd only trust something like that with lab testing and I haven't found any resources for that (the Wet Canvas forum doesn't count).
    Thanks for the ideas Interesting, I'll look into those panels... don't think I ever heard of that, but have considered trying making my own from panels and this "watercolor ground" that comes in bucket and can be applied to various things... So if it's basically the same, maybe pre-prepped panels are better. Have you tried them?

  15. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 9 Times in 6 Posts
    I haven't tried them yet. I was kind of looking at them (and some others) as a suitable surface for silverpoint. But there are masonite panels with different grounds for watercolor, pastel, scratchboard, and encaustic in addition to the usual oil/acrylic surfaces. The panels I've seen are made by Ampersand: https://ampersandart.com/aquabord.php
    "A pig that doesn't fly is just a pig."

  16. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    834
    Thanks
    748
    Thanked 405 Times in 309 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by xtal View Post
    I haven't tried them yet. I was kind of looking at them (and some others) as a suitable surface for silverpoint. But there are masonite panels with different grounds for watercolor, pastel, scratchboard, and encaustic in addition to the usual oil/acrylic surfaces. The panels I've seen are made by Ampersand: https://ampersandart.com/aquabord.php
    Wow, they are expensive, haha they make a sheet of Fabriano paper look cheap! But definitely something I wanna try out when getting better at art because these I can't afford to fail much on, thank you very much for the recommendation

  17. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    1,769
    Thanks
    291
    Thanked 522 Times in 435 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by xtal View Post
    I haven't tried them yet. I was kind of looking at them (and some others) as a suitable surface for silverpoint. But there are masonite panels with different grounds for watercolor, pastel, scratchboard, and encaustic in addition to the usual oil/acrylic surfaces. The panels I've seen are made by Ampersand: https://ampersandart.com/aquabord.php
    Haven't either as here where I life there aren't even illustration boards but with quick search https://www.dickblick.com/categories...anels/details/
    Last edited by stonec; August 6th, 2018 at 10:25 AM.

  18. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 9 Times in 6 Posts
    You could just glue watercolor paper to a board, I've seen tutorials for that. You'd want to gesso anything like masonite or wood first, but if you have rag mat board you could probably skip that step. But it might be that the cost of the pre-made watercolor boards work out to the same as getting the materials to do it yourself or getting the painting matted and framed behind glass.
    "A pig that doesn't fly is just a pig."

  19. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    834
    Thanks
    748
    Thanked 405 Times in 309 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by xtal View Post
    You could just glue watercolor paper to a board, I've seen tutorials for that. You'd want to gesso anything like masonite or wood first, but if you have rag mat board you could probably skip that step. But it might be that the cost of the pre-made watercolor boards work out to the same as getting the materials to do it yourself or getting the painting matted and framed behind glass.
    Yeh, the glueing watercolor paper to a board was the reason for the wax thing, because then it was supposed to have gone without glass and stuff like that... I'm not very handy with glue, so it might be much cheaper to just buy the boards now that I have been made aware of their existence... I'm one of those people who manage to get glue everywhere, regularly managing to glue together items lying around on my desk, the less glue the better xD

  20. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 9 Times in 6 Posts
    I figure the manufacturers have done product testing that is difficult for an artist to do. . . if I tried to do it myself I'd probably end up wasting a lot of money on failed experiments. I'm completely skeptical of any solvent based finish being safe to use on paper, though. The way I look at it, if that wax finish was safe to use on watercolors or paper the manufacturer would be labeling it as such (more uses=more money). I haunt the thrift stores to get frames and do my own matting (because I'm cheap ).
    "A pig that doesn't fly is just a pig."

  21. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    834
    Thanks
    748
    Thanked 405 Times in 309 Posts
    Hmmm, I agree they would probably label it as such if it was meant for paper... But the wax I bought was labeled under "wax varnish" and didn't realize and actually thought it was different than oil painting medium, but then I researched it and it showed up as such on other websites. It was listed as varnish for iconic tempera paintings, which I then assume might be on walls then?

    Haha, yes experiments is always a money-risk, but then again if they are never done, you'll never know
    Lols, I have actually considered hunting down old frames from thrift stores too, just to get the frame though.... We aren't cheap, we just support recycling xD

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: May 18th, 2015, 01:47 AM
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: January 18th, 2011, 11:54 AM
  3. SketchBook: Vim Viva's Ignite Inspiration
    By VimViva in forum Sketchbooks
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: July 9th, 2010, 04:02 PM
  4. Art: scared of baking my supersculpey dolphin :( will wood ignite?
    By StarFyreXXX in forum 3D Art, Sculpture & Toy Art
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: November 7th, 2005, 05:44 PM

Members who have read this thread: 19

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Designed by The Coldest Water, we build the coldest best water bottles, ice packs and best pillows.