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  1. #1
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    Figure drawing from Imagination

    Hello guys! I think im "good" at observing reference and try to reproduce by my hand, put some feelings into the artwork...
    But i really feel the desire of drawing something mine, something that i could say... Wow i ve done this thing all alone by my mind.
    Do you have any figure or character drawing lessons, book or whatever it is, to learn to draw them from imagination?
    Im experimenting with a mannequin, that i can draw by gesturing a reference pose, but nothing else more than that..
    Ty


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  3. #2
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    Did you know that gesture is everything to a good figure drawing ?

    If your character from imagination isn't good enough then it's a sign that you should hammer more quick 5 minutes gesture studies

  4. #3
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    You'll always need some sort reference, but really you should design a composition first, then find your reference. Also you could take a drawing you did and then expand on it. Neglecting your imagination and composition will leave you just as a copyist. Having a good knowledge of structure will help.

  5. #4
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    To draw effectively from imagination you must have a thorough understanding of some construction method like Reilly, Loomis, or Proko that gives you a framework to build your characters on. Once you learn relative proportions and range of motion mechanics you can use that as an anchor for your imagination. Without real-world observational knowledge, your imagination will never have a sense of believability.

  6. #5
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    can you please explain why gesture drawings are so important?

  7. #6
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    Good gesture gives a sense of life to your work. Otherwise, no matter how much detail you include, your figures will have a shot and stuffed look, they will be stiff and unnaturally awkward in balance and pose.

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  9. #7
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    Get in life drawing classes, where you get to draw real model, dunno how how in other countries/places are structured but in here where I live has quick gesture class where you do only something like 5 min to below (rarely 5 and very rare 10 min) poses. Other class is for longer poses where pose can last for one or two session, session= 2h, or shorter depending on medium that teacher tell us to use and of course there are breaks for model every 20 min for both classes

  10. #8
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    I'll second the value of life drawing. It forces you to stop analyzing everything and just draw.
    "A pig that doesn't fly is just a pig."

  11. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by xtal View Post
    I'll second the value of life drawing. It forces you to stop analyzing everything and just draw.
    Depends on the approach. When drawing from life, work on reinforcing a solid drawing process, from gesture to anatomy. And, yes, life drawing can be a waste of time.
    Grinnikend door het leven...

    Sketchbook Blog

  12. #10
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    Well. . . you haven't lived until you've had a professor berating the class for not drawing the penis on the male model. Although, it's tricky to get that far on the model in just a minute or two. Part of the value of life drawing for me was being able to watch the other artists at work and getting instant feedback. Longer poses meant I could draw the model from various angles if I wished. I put the work in and got valuable skills out of it. As with everything YMMV.
    "A pig that doesn't fly is just a pig."

  13. #11
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    Thanks you. Should i learn a mannequin and landmarks, then from that, try to experiment the figure?

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