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  1. #1
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    Red face Choosing a limited palette (marker pens)

    I've kept a sketchbook for a while and I'd like to start learning colour, but my experience is small - some pastel work and coloured pencils, which helped me understand more about using colours in less obvious places (red in a deep blue sky, pink in distant fields...). I do know it's best to work with a limited palette, if only to lighten the load when sketching outside, but when I start thinking about what to pick my brain freezes up. I'm going shopping for pens soonish. How should I go about it?

    I'll be using Zig Art & Graphic Twins, which are water-based. (I've been using a dark and a light grey since last year and love the feel of the tip - like painting with a very springy brush. They blend well when wet and not at all when dry, though this takes some time.)

    - this link on copics has some good suggestions, like choosing three markers from the same colour family. But the writer has built up a truly huge collection ("72-piece traveling set" WHAT)
    - eight pens is about the max that seems sensible to carry - five or six would be better if only to avoid
    - I tend to sketch urban landscapes. Lot of yellow + granite + red tiles
    - take a few variants on one colour + its complement? what if I decide on yellows + blues and THEN THERE'S A TREE??!1111 but also
    - I feel like some kind of blue is non-negotiable (because, y'know, sky) but am I wrong? (I'm probably wrong)
    - essentially, I'm drawn to scenes with bright colours (red flowers in a windowsill, deep blue sky against the tiles) but

    Please cure me of my misconceptions a̶n̶d̶ ̶i̶f̶ ̶p̶o̶s̶s̶i̶b̶l̶e̶ ̶d̶o̶ ̶m̶y̶ ̶s̶h̶o̶p̶p̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶me̶.̶

    greyscale sketches for context (eta: ye gods that's a big image sorry)
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  3. #2
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    Any particular reason you wouldn't carry a minimal number of pens, and when you get home do the coloring?

    Example:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZxJZoiE4qEY


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxA65qY3bko
    Primary Colors:
    R29 Lipstick Red
    B24 Sky
    G05 Emerald Green
    C17 Golden Yellow


    Grey Tones:
    C6 Cool Grey
    C8 Cool Grey
    N3 Neutral Grey
    N5 Neutral Grey
    May as well look at what they recommend for color or gray tones.
    https://www.amazon.com/Copic-Sketch-.../dp/B004XR97EQ
    https://www.amazon.com/Copic-Marker-.../dp/B000MRR3GU
    My commentary is a gift to you.

  4. #3
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    As I said, I'm new to colours but trying to learn, so colouring at home from memory or a photo defeats the point of working outside. I also don't want to be overwhelmed by choice - I'd rather use the 'wrong' colour than have a colour-accurate but disjointed sketch - and it seems like the best way to manage this is to limit my options while I pick things up.

    I don't know, maybe I'm asking a question to which I already know the answer. Just buy whatever and draw

  5. #4
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    Markers are all about light to darker placement; similar to water colors. Get the primary colors.. dark and light of both.. and fist full of grays, and go about your art. Like I said - the color starter set is a starter set for a reason.
    My commentary is a gift to you.

  6. #5
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    Buying a set is usually cheaper than buying one at a time. You can fill in the few colors that are missing later, as you need them. I've seen people traveling to conventions with far more than a 72 piece set of Copics (and wondered if they had a trust fund to afford all of them. ).
    "A pig that doesn't fly is just a pig."

  7. #6
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    I dont think you need big set, what you are looking when adding colors are more about relationships and it is lot easier to do with fewer colors than many. You can even work with super limited pallettes if you please http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/20...d-palette.html it can be great challenge. Colors are more malleable than values, get values right and colors become your playground
    Last edited by stonec; 2 Weeks Ago at 09:03 PM.

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