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Thread: Faces

  1. #1
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    Faces

    I would like to improve upon drawing faces, as well as the entire head and hair (which is especially a weakness of mine). For this work, what tips would you suggest?

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  3. #2
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    Learn how to construct the head in space, for instance through the videos on http://www.proko.com
    Grinnikend door het leven...

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    That's a very good start, in my humble opinion.

    Regarding some specific points:
    - Eyes could show more volume. Look more spherical and follow face perspective;
    - The hair looks better when it's grouped in clumps. If the person have very straight hair, you can simplify them as ribbons. If the person has a thick or curly hair, you can make'em like "hose-like" forms. But in any case, clump it together in a few of these simplified forms and it should work better.
    - There's a weird shadow on the middle of her chin. If that was meant to be a dimple, it would be smaller and a bit lighter, I think.

    Have you tried tracing a wireframe over the drawing, digitally? It helps a lot.
    "There're no lines in real life" / Is this a sketchbook? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  5. #4
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    I just started reworking it, but there's still a way to go:

    Name:  Draw.jpg
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    I noticed several issues with the perspective and shadows, so there was not a great sense of volume. These things look more noticeable when I scan it and zoom in. It's challenging since the head of the figure occupies such a small area on the page. I'm going in with a 2H to work on all these areas to make the values cleaner.

    I will redo the hair but it looks challenging.

    I've made it smaller since, but this was the area of the chin:

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  6. #5
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    As it seems like she has a very curly hair, I'd try squinting the eyes quite a bit to capture the big chunks of values and then work for that.

    As for the shin, your work still looks a lot darker than the reference. Looking at the reference, I can't really tell why that center part of the chin looks darker. It doesn't look like a cast shadow from the chin. Maybe it's a change of color of the skin itself. In any case, it isn't helping to show the form, and in those cases, you can disregard it in favor of clarity.
    "There're no lines in real life" / Is this a sketchbook? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  7. #6
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    Worked on the face some more. what do you think now?

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  8. #7
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    You picked a hard subject with a bad reference. The easiest fix for now is to lighten up the deep shadows around her face, in the hair, which takes away some of the sensitive rendering of her face. Next time, get yourself a better reference, which shows how light and shadows can be used to model te form.
    Grinnikend door het leven...

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  9. #8
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    There's no much difference between your first and last image in terms of value treatment.

    The problem is; You're using too much contrast for secondary form modeling while forgetting about "big" value changes across primary forms (e.g. oval of the whole head). The illusion of head volume is lost because of this and your minor bumps look like dirt (e.g. forehead).

    To combat this habit of compartmentalized perception of the reference, practice drawing rough 3-value notans. It'll train you to properly group values in high, mid, and low ranges across the whole image, minimizing tendency to "overshade" details.

    This is the most common woe beginners face. Without overcoming it your work will always look amateurish.

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