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  1. #1
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    Getting a sense of space

    Hi all! Looking for some specific critique here. I'm an animator by trade but have been drawing a lot longer. I love doing environmental concept art, but never quite seem to reach the level I want. My drawings lack the atmosphere, the sense of wide open space. While they follow the rules of atmospheric perspective (at least to some degree, I hope), they still always end up looking like they're on a tight 2D canvas rather than depicting an enormous space. Here are some examples:

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    What I WANT to achieve is something like the following:

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    These three are good examples of concepts that have just an incredible sense of wide open space and atmosphere, without even having much detail. Can someone with a better eye than me tell me what I might be missing in my pieces? Thanks!


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  3. #2
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    Not an expert, but something i notice about your examples is that, with the exception of the last one, they all use some kind of path from the foreground that snakes through the picture and leads to the background. Anything like that which can be shown going back in space will create depth. You are figuring out the atmospheric perspective principle, but you tend not to have any element going back in space.

    You also tend to not really link the separated layers of background. It's a good start for sure, but if you are thinking about building your image like a stage set, or a backdrop, it's gonna look like that. You need not just overlapping flat shapes, but overlapping 3D forms. That's why the last example still looks convincing for the most part, even though it doesn't have the river like the first two.

    In all three of the example paintings they are actually using essentially flat cut out shapes in the very background, but in the foreground and midground there are full 3D forms in perspective. In the second one, with the stone buildings projecting into the picture, this is really obvious. But even organic forms like rocks and trees have perspective.

    Hope this helps!

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  5. #3
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    Yours have very minimal perspective

  6. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeCowan View Post
    Not an expert, but something i notice about your examples is that, with the exception of the last one, they all use some kind of path from the foreground that snakes through the picture and leads to the background. Anything like that which can be shown going back in space will create depth. You are figuring out the atmospheric perspective principle, but you tend not to have any element going back in space.

    You also tend to not really link the separated layers of background. It's a good start for sure, but if you are thinking about building your image like a stage set, or a backdrop, it's gonna look like that. You need not just overlapping flat shapes, but overlapping 3D forms. That's why the last example still looks convincing for the most part, even though it doesn't have the river like the first two.

    In all three of the example paintings they are actually using essentially flat cut out shapes in the very background, but in the foreground and midground there are full 3D forms in perspective. In the second one, with the stone buildings projecting into the picture, this is really obvious. But even organic forms like rocks and trees have perspective.

    Hope this helps!
    That helps a ton, thank you! I think you're right, I need an element that goes throughout the piece that connects everything together. More importantly I think I will focus on getting those mid-ground shapes to look more 3D - my work tends to turn out looking very stylized because I think I can get away with flat shapes in the mid-ground XD

  7. #5
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    Some perspective might help to get space https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNP...3Q8zr4eKvmhLGQ also edges helps with space as well contrast http://www.muddycolors.com/2017/07/1...s-about-edges/

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