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Thread: Paper Type

  1. #1
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    Paper Type

    Hi guys:

    I've been doing my art work and inking on computer paper to save money, rather than doing it on card stock paper or better. In retrospect, I feel quite foolish. The ink feels a bit more 'faded' on computer paper than I would've expected. Should I switch? Is there any way to 'salvage' the art I've done on computer paper up to this point?


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  3. #2
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    I'm afraid you cannot salvage art done on bad paper, other than by scanning it and fixing it digitally. Computer paper is great for doing lots of quick sketches, but for final work, use archival paper.
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    Is it relatively easy to fix digitally? (With the levels bar?) Or is it quite a bit more difficult?

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    Depends on the quality of the scan, the type of ink used, how faded it is, etc
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    Why don't you post a scan here? We are happy to see if we can help you.
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    Hi!

    Ink used is either from a brush pen (Kuretake, Pentel), or Dr. PhMartin's India Ink

    Paper isn't that old, the only "con" is that it's on computer paper.

    Scans are 300 DPI, .tif.

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    The only type of paper you want to worry about is if it's acid-free or archival. Permanence is important to people collecting original work if you plan to sell the originals. Its thickness or the smooth or rough qualities it has is an artistic choice.

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    Why not just do piece you like again as final for better quality paper, bigger size and cleaner or just use computer to fix it.

  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artasaurus View Post
    Scans are 300 DPI, .tif.
    Where...?
    ...which is only my opinion.
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    First of all, I agree with Dpaint, acid free is absolutely necessary, especially if you want to sell your original art or have it around forever

    ...So I assume the drawings faded somewhat equally regardless of the ink used?
    My Talens India ink is super black when it's put down on the paper, but becomes a dark gray when dry. I have an acrylic based ink that stays black, but dries shiny with too heavy layering
    I never tried the brush pens, but found this from 2009 (so it might not at all be valid anymore if they have improved the pens by now, or you have a different product!!!!)
    http://rozwoundup.typepad.com/roz_wo...rush-pens.html

    So actually, a good way to figure out your future investments regardless of which traditional medium is to make your own lightfastness tests, let them run for min. 2 months (recommended a year, but if they will fade it's probably visible after a month or two, the rest is just a question of 'how much and how fast'). The same applies to paper to determine aging/sun damage.

    Plus, if the paper is soaky (those papers that almost soak like toilet paper to higher or lesser degree), ink sometimes seems to get "dilluted" (faded/dull), or whatever it is its doing. I also practice inking on regular 80gsm copy paper with a good surface where the ink pretty much dries where it's put and it stays black even with very little feathering on dip pen lines. That paper beats all of my "soakier" drawing papers when it comes down to fine lines

    One of my personal favorite ink-drawing papers that are rather cheap (in comparison to Strathmore's Bristol) is the 170gsm from Artway that I got from Amazon in UK, and it's labeled acid free.

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