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    Art Questions

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    Last edited by BlackOwl; April 20th, 2018 at 11:41 AM.


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    Lets see your portfolio, it would make it easier to give you an answer. Nothing else matters as much as that.
    Last edited by Mike Tenebrae; April 16th, 2018 at 03:34 AM.

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    it very hard for people just starting out to find more than just occasional work. If you are in high school and have just started drawing and painting, figure about ten years to get to the level of ability that will get you paying work.
    Last edited by dpaint; April 16th, 2018 at 10:37 AM.

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    What everyone is trying to say is that your ability to find work depends on your artistic ability.
    Sketchbook (last updated June 20th, 2018)

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    I personally don't have much experience with the industry but the people I have interacted from multiple artist hangouts are all over the place on the success scale. Depends on your skill level, enthusiasm, location, available company ... etc, god know where you will end up. Do a lot of searching, preferably prioritizing local studio first.

    There are too many variables to ever give a concrete answer I think. Like if you live the the Eastern parts of the world you can get a lot of 3D works for production because of outsourcing, while fantasy concept arts are not so much. If there are some small-medium mobile game kind of studios in your area, then it could be easier to break into.
    Last edited by GPhong; April 16th, 2018 at 11:49 AM.
    People keep telling me : " Why do you keep suggesting courses and books instead of just giving me the solution directly ? "

    Well if i could condense all the necessary informations that take hours of explanation and demonstration into a single post, i would gladly do it

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    You’re kind of asking “how heavy is a bag of bricks?”. It depends. There’s so many variables no one can really give you a solid answer. Working freelance vs for a consulting company vs an in house studio, what stage of the design you’re working on, how far along the project is, what the deadlines are....
    Sketchbook (last updated June 20th, 2018)

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    Check out FZD school channel on youtube, some podcast in there have info on concept art work/education. Also other youtube channels on the subject are ArtCafe, Schoolism, Chris Oatley, Marco Bucci, Cubebrush, Sinix. I dont think you have a really clear idea of what concept art is, do some research.

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    Your portfolio should have at least 5 to10 pieces in it and you should update it every 6 months with all new images. If you can't do that then you aren't ready for professional work. A portfolio doesn't just show your quality, it shows your ability to produce work consistently over long periods of time. When I was an art director anybody who submitted the same portfolio of images twice to our company went into the trash bin, it showed they weren't serious about making art.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    Your portfolio should have at least 5 to10 pieces in it and you should update it every 6 months with all new images. If you can't do that then you aren't ready for professional work. A portfolio doesn't just show your quality, it shows your ability to produce work consistently over long periods of time. When I was an art director anybody who submitted the same portfolio of images twice to our company went into the trash bin, it showed they weren't serious about making art.
    Isn't that tough if you've been working on NDA stuff and can't show new work?

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    I was thinking about same, how long usually NDA last? I assume its longer than 6 months. Only way around it is personal work
    Last edited by stonec; April 20th, 2018 at 07:43 AM. Reason: typos

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    No, it's not. You may not be able to do 3 pieces a month, but 1 piece a month? Any professional should be able to do that. If you can't you don't have professional chops.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    No, it's not. You may not be able to do 3 pieces a month, but 1 piece a month? Any professional should be able to do that. If you can't you don't have professional chops.
    seemingly i do not have professional chops as, so far, i can't. but anyway, there's always time left for learning i can assume. anyway, thanks for answers!

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    Just to be clear, currently, I do over 100 finished paintings a year for my traditional galleries and science fiction and fantasy venues. That doesn't count sketches and failed attempts. When I was doing production art as a full-time job I still managed 60 paintings a year of personal work on top of my production art. As a professional artist, a finished piece of art every two weeks, every year of your career is not an unreasonable expectation. As an artist, you are supposed to finish pieces of art, treat it as a job and it will become your job, treat it like a hobby and you are guaranteed to make it a hobby.

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    can someone here please tell me that what skillset should one have in order to become a concept artist in the art industry?

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    You need to be able to create a fully realized scene or scenes from a short written brief and other supporting documents. The image you create should take into account the restrictions of the medium it is being created for so that it can actually be used in production as a guide for further development. That means being able to render environments including set pieces like buildings and people and tech into a believable setting that tells a story. You have to know how to draw paint and compose an image to a high degree of competence and be able to finish it in a timely manner.

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    Hello all! I'm new on this forum and this is my first post here. I had a question similar to the theme that seems to be in this thread so I thought I won't start a new one just yet. Still have a question(s) though. Here goes..

    Since I've been reading about the right brain drawing and a few other things, I have a theoretical question for people who have a bit more experience on the speed learning side of things.
    How fast would it be possible for someone with very basic skills (eg almost having it down how to shade a sphere, normal 3d vision), to grow to a level that could be described as hireable concept artist material (think league of legends as a baseline for example)? Given he or she has the right tools and the optimal resources (what type of exercises, what to focus on, etc).

    I know that @dpaint above mentioned 10 years if you're in high school and just starting out (I'm 29), but...

    I agree, mileage is one of the most important things. I guess what I'm looking for is for someone who has approached learning drawing as a skill in minute detail with emphasis on the effectiveness of the specific exercises and use of time. So they would be able to say, look I had this skill level when I started, then I systematically used this approach/these exercises, and in x amount of time, I reached this level.

    I know this type of thinking of learning a skill like drawing might be off-putting for some, but I believe it can be applied.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aljook View Post
    Hello all! I'm new on this forum and this is my first post here. I had a question similar to the theme that seems to be in this thread so I thought I won't start a new one just yet. Still have a question(s) though. Here goes..

    Since I've been reading about the right brain drawing and a few other things, I have a theoretical question for people who have a bit more experience on the speed learning side of things.
    How fast would it be possible for someone with very basic skills (eg almost having it down how to shade a sphere, normal 3d vision), to grow to a level that could be described as hireable concept artist material (think league of legends as a baseline for example)? Given he or she has the right tools and the optimal resources (what type of exercises, what to focus on, etc).

    I know that @dpaint above mentioned 10 years if you're in high school and just starting out (I'm 29), but...

    I agree, mileage is one of the most important things. I guess what I'm looking for is for someone who has approached learning drawing as a skill in minute detail with emphasis on the effectiveness of the specific exercises and use of time. So they would be able to say, look I had this skill level when I started, then I systematically used this approach/these exercises, and in x amount of time, I reached this level.

    I know this type of thinking of learning a skill like drawing might be off-putting for some, but I believe it can be applied.
    Lol It's actually exactly how everything should be taught xD . There are some FZD school student note somewhere on 4Chan /ic board that you can use as reference .

    Do you also know that http://www.fusroda.com/hangout has actual working artists stopping by ?
    Last edited by GPhong; June 8th, 2018 at 03:28 AM.
    People keep telling me : " Why do you keep suggesting courses and books instead of just giving me the solution directly ? "

    Well if i could condense all the necessary informations that take hours of explanation and demonstration into a single post, i would gladly do it

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    I think the expectation of reaching a certain level by a certain time period is what makes people give up. I very recently have started learning organic 3D modelling, and tutorial series I watch have almost consistently a 70% drop between part 1 and parts 2-10. People get frustrated when after an hour they don’t have something that looks like what the pro has. They realize it’s not going to be as fast or as easy as they thought and they give up. I’ve been following step by step videos, and sometimes after four hours I realize I made a critical mistake somewhere so I delete it and start all over again. There’s one project I’m working on that’s I’ve restarted totally from scratch like 6 times because I realized there was a better way to do it and I want to train myself right. You have to learn to love the process. The product comes after. Unfortunately people want the product first and the process is just something in their way to getting it.
    Sketchbook (last updated June 20th, 2018)

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    I’m not saying you’ll give up after an hour, but what about a month? Or six months? It’s a lifelong process. And you make something you LOVE and everything is worth it, then a month later you look back and think “wow that was garbage”
    Sketchbook (last updated June 20th, 2018)

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    I absolutely get what you mean. But there are a few differences with how I'm thinking about it. The way I see that logic, is that if you're giving up easily, 1) you don't REALLY like doing it as much as you thought you do (or you like the idea of being good at it but not willing to do the work to get there) and/or 2) you have some timeline in place to get some results (obtaining technique/getting to a certain level, etc) but you don't set in place the necessary system of training for that timeline to work. For example you want to be able to reach a certain realism level of drawing from life in 6 months, but you just keep trying and trying to do the same thing. I mean sure, practice is good, any kind of practice is good in the long run. But if you want to frame your achievements in any amount of time, you also need to frame very specifically how it is that you're going to get there. And just doodling (while in no means absolutely worthless in regards of growth), is kind of like buying a lottery ticket and hoping that you'll get the 10 grand, but most of the time you get... well, not nothing, but lets say your money back or a bit extra, which is still progress

    To come clean, my current timeframe on my "mission" is to get to a level that could offer at least an entry level paying job in any kind of area that would utilize digital drawing skills. I however needed to do some research and find out if anything like this is even remotely possible. Then I found out about a guy named Andrew Price, who set a mission for himself to get a 1000 likes on an art platform (maybe Artstation) in 6 months. I looked at his skill levels where he was when he started it, and where he ended up and found out the starting level was similar to mine and by the end, well he got his 1000 likes in 6 months. Im not saying that level was enough to get a paying job, but for the untrained eye his work become pretty good

    So now I am waiting for my Betty Edwards book from amazon, and just hoping to find anything valuable with what to refine the process.

    Sorry for the long rambling, got a bit all over the place, haha. I do however get what you mean about it getting really easy to give up if you don't see the progress you might prematurely expect. Here's to hoping that just won't happen to me, as I at least THINK I've thought about this long enough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aljook View Post
    For example you want to be able to reach a certain realism level of drawing from life in 6 months, but you just keep trying and trying to do the same thing. I mean sure, practice is good, any kind of practice is good in the long run. But if you want to frame your achievements in any amount of time, you also need to frame very specifically how it is that you're going to get there. And just doodling (while in no means absolutely worthless in regards of growth), is kind of like buying a lottery ticket and hoping that you'll get the 10 grand, but most of the time you get... well, not nothing, but lets say your money back or a bit extra, which is still progress
    The term you're looking for is deliberate practice

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  28. #23
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    “Entry Level Job in any kind of area that would utilize digital drawing skills”
    this is so broad is makes my head spin. I’ll come back to this though.

    I think you may be misunderstanding Andrew Price. He started in 2004 and admits it took him 4 years to get to anything good. He even admits he was a large burden on the community because he was inundating people with questions about every little thing constantly. He’s been at it almost 15 years now and he’s only 28 years old, so a large chunk of that experience was when he had the infinite time and resources of a teenager. That timeline is much less feasible if you’re an adult which a career, family, bills to pay, etc. While he is a great artist, I wouldn’t use him as a meterstick to measure yourself against.

    which brings me to the first topic - Andrew Price is a very good CG artist, but even he doesn’t really make a living from his artwork. Instead he runs high quality texture websites for CG artists and sometimes sells scripts or packages to make CG art easier. Art is a super broad field and, while I’m not saying you need to pick a speciality right now, you need to think about what you actually want to do. Do you want to be a freelance portrait artist for families who want a nice Christmas present? Do you want to make cartoony stickers and sell them on Redbubble? Do you want to work in Hollywood on the latest films? And if you do, do you want to be a concept artist or a VFX artist or a storyboard artist or a title graphics artist or a colourist or a marketer etc etc etc. Aimlessly moving towards “something to do with digital art” is going to have you meandering around for years. Pick a thing and try to work towards that. If you don’t like it you can always change it later. But it helps to have a direction to work towards besides “cool art”
    Sketchbook (last updated June 20th, 2018)

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  30. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aljook View Post
    .
    I can't guarantee you a job. But reaching a certain level of realistic drawing ? That's possible.

    Realism is built basically on perspective and proportion. Everything else is built on top of those 2 . Want to draw human being ? Learn anatomy, gesture, do face/figure studies . Want to draw car and mech ? Study the engine , how they are built ... etc.

    Basic drawing, sketching exercise to help train your hand to do what your brain wants : Either drawabox.com ( which has incredibly bad example in the perspective section ) or dig up some Peter Han's Dynamic Sketching stuffs somewhere on the web . It's also advised to do this training using pen and paper instead of digitally .
    Training your eyes to measure and get accuracy of proportion : http://www.dorian-iten.com/accuracy/
    Perspective : Scott Robertson - How to Draw ( his book has a link to his video demo of each chapter, which I find incredibly helpful.

    I also made this camera array in Maya 2018 student version(which is free btw ), You can use it as reference for drawing cubes and other basic shapes . Import model, 3D scans to practice drawing, a quick search on how to import model,where to find the render buttons is enough :
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_G..._t2lnglMm45soN
    Try to use it as reference and make it look 100% like the ref , overlay the ref on top of your drawing , note the problem , fix the problem , rinse and repeat.

    As for how many of these you should work on , just work until you are confident. Get a software like ManicTime , if you don't have a day job, then don't stop until you have spent at least 8 hours on Photoshop everyday ( or whatever medium , program you are working on ).

    Also try to differentiate between illustrator and concept artists ( despite this website being conceptart.org I barely concept art here ) . if you aim to paint like some dead guys in the past and hate doing researches then concept art is not for you.
    Also a helpful link : https://gumroad.com/l/ytTjT
    People keep telling me : " Why do you keep suggesting courses and books instead of just giving me the solution directly ? "

    Well if i could condense all the necessary informations that take hours of explanation and demonstration into a single post, i would gladly do it

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  32. #25
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    @octopuscats Article <- That's an article on blenderguru written by Andrew Price on the 6 month thing. He started it in 2015, married. Now, I haven't looked into what his non-2D work looked like before he started the challenge, but his initial 2D drawings I've seen were slightly above my current ability. I'm pretty sure he may have started with something else in 2004 but it wasn't 2D painting/drawing, by his own words at least. Also, the challenge was a 6 month period and of course I understand that since people and their lives are different, I probably can't just take his approach 1 to 1. One of the first bigger differences regarding that is that I am looking at a 1 year time frame, not 6 months.

    The long term goal is to focus on concept art. I recognize that there are a lot of subskills (matte painting, for example, etc) I need to learn for that.

    @GPhong Yeah I figured bringing the job subject in is a bit too ambiguous to discuss on it properly. Thanks a lot for the links and especially the camera array (I've dabbled with Maya a bit) and the PDF, I appreciate it a lot! But yeah, if anything, concept art is my goal, as far as I can think right now, mainly character and secondly environments.

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