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  1. #1
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    Novice/beginner looking for critique on this fox sketch

    Name:  fox1critique 001.jpg
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    I'd like you to give me constructive crictism and help me point out mistakes in this picture (anatomy ones, proportion ones, perspective ones, etc etc) and ways to make it better so I can improve my drawing ability.


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  3. #2
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    It’s tough to give criticism on such a light scan because it’s difficult to see the actual artwork. Try bumping up your contrast, or using something like Camscanner
    Sketchbook (last updated June 20th, 2018)

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  5. #3
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    Yeah, like in your sketchbook I'm having a difficult time seeing the image. You need to play around with your scanner settings and maybe do some editing in post so we can see what's going on.

    I would say though, that a cat probably shouldn't have it's claws out if it's relaxing.

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  7. #4
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    Not the clearest image but I will say you have lots of lines that tell me you are not just drawing "a line" to describe your subject, but many lines! That is a wonderful way to build and create images. I teach a method I call Decision lines/Commitment lines. Multiple light lines (decision lines) allows you to find the shape that does feel correct. By lightly defining the path that works you are Committing to the shape (commitment line). I don't let them erase the decision lines as these create a moving, living, fluid visual about the subject, and they keep LIFE in the sketch. This cannot be achieved with a single line. Keep sketching lightly and carve your objects out of the lines you lay down.

  8. #5
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    Hey. I boosted up the contrast. Is it clearer to see now?
    Name:  foxcritque1contrast 001.jpg
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  9. #6
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    That looks so much better, now you just have to do that with every drawing from now on. But yeah, as toplessartist said, you've got too many hairy lines going on.

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  11. #7
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    The perspective doesn't look too bad but the far foot looks a bit awkward (or even upside down?).

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  13. #8
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    Haha. No, I didn't actually mention "hairy lines", but that's funny! Actually I'm a big proponent of using lots of lines in the attempt to find the object. I did a reeeeally quick sketch to show what I mean by "decision lines" and "commitment lines"... The left side is a soft and thoughtful series of shapes, in multiple decision lines in my attempt to find my object. When I see, somewhere in the mix, the lines that are pleasing to me and represent my basic form or object, well then I move in and LIGHTLY and CAREFULLY add a bit of emphasis to ensure I have the shapes or forms that work. I leave the rest of the lines for two reasons. 1: they keep life in the sketch, motion, movement, and the drawing doesn't get so static. 2: they were lines that allowed me to find a successful shape, and they are reminders as I continue to sketch that I can carve and mold my object and not be afraid of soft linework to get there. Talk to yourself as you sketch, teach yourself, correct yourself, and more importantly tell yourself when you do some great work. These are sketches!.. rough drafts of our ideas, not gems, or diamonds that only et one chance to be perfect! Use unsuccessful sketches to re-sketch, find out why it didn't work. Keep in mind, my sketch isn't meant to be your sketch, but it is dog-fox shaped and is just a guide.

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