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  1. #1
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    Town Scene in Perspective

    What I have here is a fantasy-town meant to have a bit of a comic-book feel to it. I've been focusing on lines, perspective, and colors/textures here. I also have yet to shade this. So, does anyone have any thoughts about the lines and line weight, the perspective, and how the colors look so far here? What can I add to make it look like a more appealing comic page?Name:  ponethia perspective.jpg
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  3. #2
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    You screwed up the perspective, as the doors differ in height dramatically, judging by their position with respect to the horizon line. For appeal, make sure you include foreground, midground and background, with some overlaps, and think about the function of your cityscape: is it an alley, busy street, city square?
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  4. #3
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    Hi,

    As eezacque mentioned, your perspective is indeed off. It isn't entirely clear to me where the horizon line is meant to be; I think you meant for it to be about where the white background meets the brown ground. However, this then doesn't line up properly with many of the roofs, which should be far more diagonal. Try drawing your horizon line on a separate layer on top of all your other work, mark your vanishing point, and with the line tool just draw in the converging lines in some bright colour, so that you can clearly see where you're going wrong.

    Your colors look alright here, though you might want to consider adding some more colour variety on the buildings on the right. Right now, the colors in the image are quite unbalanced, as there's a strong white bloc on the right, with far more variety on the left.

    Hope that helps!

  5. #4
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    Thank you for the feedback! Perspective has been a struggle for me but these tips are very helpful.

  6. #5
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    Yeah perspective issues aside, and they are many and varied. I would suggest a more methodical approach to your street scene.
    Why? I hear you ask, well the street doesn't make any sense to me. There are houses on either side or shops whatever and then there is a tree or water fountain thing plonked in the middle?
    My suggestion is look at it from the top down and plan it!
    By looking at it from the top down you can logically pick and choose what goes where and what is the best angle to look from to form the image.
    So if you want a focal point of a tree or a fountain or some such then plan it out and make it one.
    The focus of the image needs to pull the eye to itself, so it that is a tree or whatever then put it in its own space like a square or park, the one you have at the moment is just a hazard to navigation.

    Don't be depressed by all this just roll with it and take the lessons from it, have fun and do some more. We are all happy to help brutally honest! but happy to help out.

    Best wishes with the work
    A great kind hearted lumbering bullock



    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=209918 = my Sketchbook

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  8. #6
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    What is focal point, my eyes goes to background and there is nothing to see, think about what is this scene about or what is most important story-wise and put contrasts there, and most detail as well

  9. #7
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    - - - Updated - - -

    Yeah perspective issues aside, and they are many and varied. I would suggest a more methodical approach to your street scene.
    Why? I hear you ask, well the street doesn't make any sense to me. There are houses on either side or shops whatever and then there is a tree or water fountain thing plonked in the middle?
    My suggestion is look at it from the top down and plan it!
    By looking at it from the top down you can logically pick and choose what goes where and what is the best angle to look from to form the image.
    So if you want a focal point of a tree or a fountain or some such then plan it out and make it one.
    The focus of the image needs to pull the eye to itself, so it that is a tree or whatever then put it in its own space like a square or park, the one you have at the moment is just a hazard to navigation.

    Don't be depressed by all this just roll with it and take the lessons from it, have fun and do some more. We are all happy to help brutally honest! but happy to help out.

    Best wishes with the work

    Would you say it's a good general rule to plan things out top-down first when creating an environment with sensible and believable functionality?

  10. #8
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    Hi Zak

    If I am doing a town scene or something complicated like that then yes "Planning is everything" the things we know well on a human level like street scenes always show their mistakes to us. We know them well and anything wrong leaps out at us from an image.
    I am not saying do a detailed plan like something from a survey map, but certainly think about what you can see and what you cant. it helps lose the extraneous details.
    The stages I use are generally as follows:-
    1) think about the narrative, what story am I trying to tell?
    2) Quickly list the must have things or the focus of the image
    3) Plan it from the top down.
    4) Do series of quick thumbnails based on your plan, because your first idea is generally not the best one, sometimes it is but mostly no.
    5) leave thumbnails alone for a while and make a coffee or do something else to take your mind off the image.
    6) Go back and look at the thumbnails and see which ones leap out at you. Find the good ones and throw the rest.
    7) Refine the thumbnails and make sure they fit the narrative modify as needed.
    8) pick the best and work it up to the finished image.

    Seems a bit clinical and doesn't fit with the carefree artist splashing paint everywhere! but that isn't real. To get it right we do roughs, thumbnails, experiments and lots and lots of mistakes ha ha ha ha and the planning helps speed things up long term.

    I hope that helps, it is some of the best advice I was ever given here!
    A great kind hearted lumbering bullock



    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=209918 = my Sketchbook

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  12. #9
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    Yes, definately! I am all for having a structured approach to problems if it means getting the best results possible. Thanks!

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