Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    86
    Thanks
    32
    Thanked 10 Times in 10 Posts

    Female figure in watercolor study

    Name:  harlequin.jpg
Views: 1275
Size:  255.4 KB

    I had problems laying down a graduating wash for the background. After this was already too dark to go in any other direction, I thought of using the loose splatter.
    I am still struggling with the medium, so any comments on technique is more than welcome.


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    2,903
    Thanks
    3,101
    Thanked 1,944 Times in 1,012 Posts
    I think you have already answered a lot of your own questions regarding possible issues with the technique. With watercolors always safest to start as light as possible (not a hard and fast rule, just a safe one.) Light both in terms of value and the amount of paint to water. It retains freedom for a long as possible while you build up tones and form and is easier to correct should the need arise.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 2 Times in 1 Post
    You could try lifting the color from the background until just the stain remains. This can create an interesting effect as well. Or you could bump up the contrast on the figure.

    As far as colors I like them, but personally, next to the bright yellow/green I would use light blue, not almost grey color. The yellow/green makes the rest of the face done in mostly greys look dead.

    If you don't like the hard lines created when you make a new brush stroke on a dry layer, you can make the stroke, then clean the brush, then wipe it on your towel until the brush is only damp, then lightly blend out the hard edge. Once there is a little paint on the brush, wash again, dry until damp, then continue blending the edge. Repeat until you have a smooth blend. I love using this technique when I don't feel like doing wet on wet.

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to MasterPaintingNow For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    86
    Thanks
    32
    Thanked 10 Times in 10 Posts
    Thanks Mike. I feel like I struggle between between being too tentative and not too bold, hamfisted would be better description. Fortunately lots of practice should help with this. I'm still at the stage with layering where I end up muddying everything. I'm using decent paper, 300gsm, cotton cold and the W&N Cotmans is all I can afford at this stage. I guess it comes down to using staining colors and even more importantly having the right amount of water in the brush when laying down the subsequent glazes.

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    86
    Thanks
    32
    Thanked 10 Times in 10 Posts
    By the time, I realized my mistake about the dark background, it was too late to lift. Too be honest, the initial idea was to paint monochrome and on a whim I added the blue and yellow after I already had the negative background. Spontaneity vs better planning, I guess. Thanks for the tip about the hard edges.

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    1,633
    Thanks
    251
    Thanked 471 Times in 397 Posts
    Remember you have to do it with 3 to 4 layers max or else you lose transparency, so I suggest you to try lifting or starting all over again and dont put anything down, if it doesn't do anything to next layer.
    some info https://keenewilson.com/page/12220/focus-on-watercolor

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to stonec For This Useful Post:


  10. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    2,903
    Thanks
    3,101
    Thanked 1,944 Times in 1,012 Posts
    Nothing wrong with that paper. Invest in artist quality masking tape would be my suggestion though. If you are still worried about the tape eating the paper upon lift off, a good trick is to lay the tape down on your clothing first, lift off and then apply to paper. It releases some of the tack, but still holds to the paper. The better the tape, the better it will treat you and the paper.

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Mike Tenebrae For This Useful Post:


Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: September 29th, 2009, 02:36 PM
  2. Female Figure Study
    By mark malone in forum Art Critique Center
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: November 22nd, 2007, 01:58 PM
  3. Female Figure Study in Photoshop
    By mark malone in forum Art Critique Center
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: November 22nd, 2007, 02:14 AM
  4. female figure rendering study - feedback please!!
    By FrontlinePs.10 in forum Art Critique Center
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: October 8th, 2005, 11:47 PM
  5. watercolor pencil figure
    By Asmodeus in forum Art Critique Center
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: January 5th, 2004, 01:05 AM

Members who have read this thread: 3

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Designed by The Coldest Water, we build the coldest best water bottles, ice packs and best pillows.