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  1. #1
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    Lightwave 3d likenesses

    I have been a Lightwave 3d user for years and mostly doing architectural and background elements/reference perspective for my art in Photoshop. Lately I've been trying my hand at modeling more organic things and animating for visual effects. Here's a new challenge for me, trying likeness. Actress Brie Larson is slated to play Captain Marvel, so I tried modeling her face. Her more subtle features I thought were more difficult to achieve than trying someone like Clint Eastwood that has much more exaggerated features. With this, I thought I was able to capture her smile at least. Her hair, lashes and eyebrows were made using transparency maps that I painted in Photoshop onto added low poly geometry, instead of using fibers. You can see the additional brow and lash geometry in the wireframe. Bump and color textures were made in Photoshop.

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    Cheers,
    Yeti
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    Last edited by yeticatcher; September 4th, 2017 at 04:20 PM. Reason: edit thumb image size


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  3. #2
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    That looks very creepy. Keep in mind that the Iris is not just pasted on the eyeball. It is actually concave, which means that it is darker at the top when light hits it from above.

  4. #3
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    Thanks for the comment Tiggeraz. The eyeball is built with the concave iris and a cornea membrane. I understand anatomy and modeling with all that in mind. In this case, the lighting isn't creating that shadow at the top of concave shape that you mention.

    As for the creepy comment, please let me know what you are seeing as the issue, that may help me make appropriate adjustments.

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeticatcher View Post
    As for the creepy comment, please let me know what you are seeing as the issue, that may help me make appropriate adjustments.
    Sorry for being unclear on that. The 'creepy' comment was refering to the eyes looking flat and drawn on. I think what adds to that effect is that the value of the pupils is too high and the color of the eyes are very desaturated and muted. That is something that we subconciously associate with flat painted surfaces. But eyes don't react like that when they are exposed to light, the color of the eye is still of very high chroma and the pupil contracts but keeps it's deep black value. You can see this when you look up photos of Brie Larson.

  6. #5
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    Yes, great observation. I will strive for that combination of effects. The eyes can definitely make or break the believability of a portrait.

    Cheers,
    Yeti

  7. #6
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    I made a few adjustments starting with her eyes. Thanks to Tiggeraz' observation paying attention on how the light affects the rich coloration and shadows of the iris and pupil. First, I adjusted the size and depth of the iris geometry and the overall size of the eyeball. Added a little bit of fresnel shaders to the eyeballs as well. Then adjusted the lighting positions and colors. I did some refinement to the shape of her eyelids and parts of her face. I think it made her a bit less "creepy".

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  8. #7
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    Part of what makes this face creepy is that the eye muscles don't mimic the smile of her mouth. If I look at just the upper part of the face, I'm expecting a neutral facial expression, but then there's this smile underneath. The disconnect gives a 'creepy stalker' feel.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by freakstyle View Post
    Part of what makes this face creepy is that the eye muscles don't mimic the smile of her mouth. If I look at just the upper part of the face, I'm expecting a neutral facial expression, but then there's this smile underneath. The disconnect gives a 'creepy stalker' feel.
    It is the fake smile you get when you use your zygomaticus major only, without the zygomaticus minor which touches the orbicularis oculi...
    Grinnikend door het leven...

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  11. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by eezacque View Post
    It is the fake smile you get when you use your zygomaticus major only, without the zygomaticus minor which touches the orbicularis oculi...
    and all this time i've been smiling without using my zygomaticus minor

  12. #10
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    Why is part of the face sweating?
    My commentary is a gift to you.

  13. #11
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    Thanks guys. The actress tends to smile closed mouth with her eyes quite big. Though my references are likely when she is standing in front of flashing cameras, which holding her eyes wide makes it less likely to have a "blink" photo snapped. So I think it's a matter of using different, more natural expressions to work from next time. This was an experiment after all.

    modi123:
    Face sweat? You haven't heard of too much specularity or gloss? Perhaps that's the reason.

  14. #12
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    It may work for other things, but certainly not a face where it looks like slobber or sweat.
    My commentary is a gift to you.

  15. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by modi123 View Post
    It may work for other things, but certainly not a face where it looks like slobber or sweat.
    Your words of wisdom are really helpful.

  16. #14
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    .. and that's all anyone can ask.
    My commentary is a gift to you.

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