Art: Getting that grey 3D concept art look : )

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  1. #1
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    Question Getting that grey 3D concept art look : )

    ok easy question i know you guy know what im talking about, and im sure its not hard to do. what material do you use?

    im talking about that muted gray look that all unfinished models have. The ones that doesnít shine, looks kinda hazy, the shadows are very blurry and so are the highlights. if you donít know hat i mean i can post an example. Iím sure thereís no one way to do it, but anyway is fine by me : )

    im just curious, and would love to know.

    anyone? )

    l.a.t.e.r.z.
    Mr. C

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  3. #2
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    sound like your talking about global illumination or GI for short
    its just a feature most of the recent rendering system offer to cast a dome of light around the scene.
    if not it only a 3 point light setup with a diffuse only shader
    i use mix of both when i show wip like a low GI plus 1 -2 spot light to add highlight in some spot

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  4. #3
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    yeah, it definitely sounds like you're talking about quick GI bounces. It's a cop out, really, to setting up more advanced lighting rigs... but it DOES make things look nice and evenly lit. You used to have to simulate it with a dome array.

    You can recreate it in 3dstudio max quite easily, if that's what youre using. -Delete ALL lights from the scene,
    -make sure your subject material has little or no self illumination, and add one "skylight" from the top menu.
    -Point it where you want, although it doesnt seem to make an incredible difference.
    -Hit the "9" key to bring up the Advanced lighting menu.
    -Change it to "Light Tracer" and make "bounces" equal to "0" or "1", or more depending on how much time you have to wait around. Honestly, I always just use "0", it's simulates soft light distribution pretty well and for test shots I don't care about crazy light bouncing all over the place. Everything else can probably stay the same, except the multiplier if you want it lighter or darker.
    -Hit F10 and render!

    Oh, you probably want to add a box or a plane for the the ground, or you won't anything to recieve that nice soft shadow you'll be generating.


    Again, this is a cop out... that's why it's good for wips though, because it's easy to see the form with something evenly lit like this. It also makes errors look good, which is also why people use it for wips.

    Here's some links for you:
    good tutorial on lighting - http://grayson.cgworks.com/tutorials/lighting/
    good book on lighting theory
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...271392-4497459

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  5. #4
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    thanks guys that helps alot : )

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