Art: egg tempera

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: egg tempera

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    sarasota, fl
    Posts
    166
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    egg tempera

    im going to be painting in egg tempera in one of my painting classes this week and was wondering if anyone has any tips/techniques they could share?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Castrop-Rauxel, Germany
    Posts
    1,133
    Thanks
    30
    Thanked 15 Times in 11 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Do you want to make "real" egg-tempera yourself and need a recepture?

    Basically you´re using the yellow part of the egg and mix it with linseed oil and add pigment. A usual mixing is 1 part egg and 4 part oil. The more oil ou´re using the longer the color needs to dry. You can add a little curd soap solution. The color you get with this is UV-resistant and will darken a little with the time

    Furthermore it depends on what ground you´re working. If youre doing a fresco you can mix complete eggs, milk and the pigment. I heard that this recept is very good with chalk.

    Of course the ground should be primed - a traditional way is to use a mixture of champagne chalk and animal glue.

    The result should be a semi matt finish. You can have it more luminous (?) if you´re finishing it with lin seed oil finishing.

    Hope this could help you (even with my reduced vocabulary )

    Fipse

    (who´s using egg-tempera for historical reconstructions)

    <Insert witty remark here>
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Gdansk, Poland
    Posts
    4,834
    Thanks
    887
    Thanked 1,567 Times in 753 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I was going to make new topic but found this one. So far I've been painting only with tempera and I was curious if there were some tips on the net. Found only this website - http://www.eggtempera.com
    Not very useful stuff to me.
    I don't have to mix eggs with pigments beacause I buy ready tempera paints in tubes. I was told that for practice purpose (beacause I'm still beginner in painting) the cheap way to prepare ground is just by painting it with emulsion paint.

    My question is can I use acrylic techniques for tempera painting? Tempera dries quickly just like acrylic paint so maybe these two are similar. Are there some big differences between those two kinds of paints?

    Farvus.

    EDIT: Heh. I didn't notice that the website about tempera has some forum with lot's of information .

    Last edited by Farvus; May 8th, 2006 at 02:42 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Newcastle, Australia
    Posts
    569
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    farvus yes there is
    Tempura is a more thin kind of paint alot like very fine oils yet acrylic is a very plasticy kind of paint and acrylic will never dull in colour or such but due to acrylic being so plasticy it can at times be aweful to work with if thickly applied.
    A thing my teacher found out is you can mix acrylic with a small bit of detergent and water (more water than paint, or until a consistancy you like) and you will get the same affect as a watercolour paint but the good thing is it will still be fairly stable in never fading where as I know people who have painted a painting in water colours and a few years later there will be absolutely nothing left on the page it has faded so much.

    You will find different paints will work better for different things, and youll find different tricks for using them all. Tempura and acrylic are fairly different in my opinion but try them both out and see what you like.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,669 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Farvus
    My question is can I use acrylic techniques for tempera painting? Tempera dries quickly just like acrylic paint so maybe these two are similar. Are there some big differences between those two kinds of paints?
    There can be some overlap in technique, but tempera has a different optical quality and feel under the brush. If you can, pick up a copy of New Techniques in Egg Tempera by Robert Vickrey. He's a master of pushing tempera to it's limits while staying true to it's characteristics as a medium.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Southern CT, USA
    Posts
    565
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell
    If you can, pick up a copy of New Techniques in Egg Tempera by Robert Vickrey. He's a master of pushing tempera to it's limits while staying true to it's characteristics as a medium.
    I believe that book is out of print but if you can pick up a copy it's well worth it. Vickery has an interesting way of working in which he is seemingly not married to the drawing. In the demonstrations in the book he will start with what looks like a loose smudge in an area of his painting in progress and over successive steps will become a beautifully painted figure/machine/building, etc. His painting style is very crisp & sharp.

    Mark Hannon
    Art Direction & Design
    Online Portfolio
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,669 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yeah, it's out of print, but fairly inexpensive used copies are pretty easy to come by.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Philly PA
    Posts
    3,393
    Thanks
    108
    Thanked 1,475 Times in 469 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    funny story: back in school, I had a Materials and Techniques instructor who prefered egg tempera (do not ask me why) for painting but warned us to store them in not only a light safe location, but creature safe as well. He'd recently been sorting through old work and found that insects had completely "eaten" the images off a numper of his stored paintings.

    "Every little step considered one at a time is not terribly daunting" - Ethan Coen

    New books and process DVD available NOW!

    www.dvpalumbo.com

    Quickie blog (nudity)
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    843
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 225 Times in 153 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Farvus
    ...I don't have to mix eggs with pigments beacause I buy ready tempera paints in tubes. I was told that for practice purpose (beacause I'm still beginner in painting) the cheap way to prepare ground is just by painting it with emulsion paint.

    My question is can I use acrylic techniques for tempera painting? Tempera dries quickly just like acrylic paint so maybe these two are similar. Are there some big differences between those two kinds of paints?

    Farvus.

    EDIT: Heh. I didn't notice that the website about tempera has some forum with lot's of information .
    A reverse approach is more likely, as it's possible to use a tempera technique with acrylic by painting in thin layers, but that's about as close as one can get. There's some similarity in blending, but the acrylic polymers are better at that than the egg is, in my opinion. Tempera blending seems more like drawing than painting to me. You can't build an impasto surface in tempera without it cracking, or cover a large area easily with paint; not a problem with arcylics.

    The best ground for tempera is chalk and hide glue which is smooth and absorbant. It's also meant to be used only on firm surfaces like panels.

    Commercial tempera does not necessarily contain egg, most likely starches, oils, or gum, since real egg would spoil. A drop of oil of clove or vinegar is a good preservative for hand-made tempera.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #10
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Gdansk, Poland
    Posts
    4,834
    Thanks
    887
    Thanked 1,567 Times in 753 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I'm bumping this thread again beacause I forgot to thank you all for those answers. I also wanted to write about something funny that turned out.

    I recently went to art shop to buy some gouache paint. The shop-assistant smiled and told me that actually it's the same as tempera.
    Then today I searched in google for some information about it and it turns out that this tempera based on arabic gum is actually gouache.

    So the paint I was all the time using for few years has tempera written on the label but it's not egg tempera. Why I didn't figure it out earlier? I know it sounds obvious but when I was searching on the net for some information about painting techniques, I could type gouache and find much more useful stuff.

    Thanks again.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •