Peter's sketches while in New Orleans
 
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  3. #2
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    Your sketches put a smile on my face. I really enjoyed seeing how you structure your drawings with the perspective lines and that you can see many different stages in the process in a few of them. They all got a lovely mood.

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    Wow. You're use of perspective is very inspirational. Amazing job! I need to subscribe to this thread, looking forward to more

    Need some inspiration? Check out my blog/website, it is a tool for artists! ArtPrompts.org
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    Wow! I love your building sketches.

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    Oh wow… this is really nice. The architectural sketches are fantastic - "view from a cafe window" is my favourite.

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    These are so beautiful and such a pleasure to look at. I love all your architecture sketches and the one with the band. This makes me wish I'd practice my perspective more often. Please keep posting!

    Sketchbook - http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=277664

    "He who has a why to live can bear any how."
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  20. #13
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    I would like to thank everyone for the comments; I am noticing quite a few of you commenting on my use of perspective, and I'm glad to see that it is bringing in such a positive response. I have to say that this type of work is something that I enjoy doing and is one of my stronger areas. (One of my art directors once commented that my mind was like a 3D engine with a slower render rate)

    However, keep in mind that while it is an important skill to have, perspective is not really that difficult. It's just geometry with a bunch of rules built in that get more complex as you add vanishing points and progress form 1 point perspective to 3 point. (Or more, if you choose to go curvilinear with it...)

    The fact that this is the focus of most of the comments tells me that I need to start working on other skill sets more.

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    Saying you need to focus on other stuff more is fair-- from what I can see, your figure drawings look pretty nice, if not as mind blowing as some of the stuff on site. A lot of people dump a ton of time into it though, and the majority of this sketchbook seems to be focused on buildings and so on, so it makes sense that's where the feedback is oriented. Your perspective is amazing, but I have to say I'm just as much captivated by how well your undersketches (markers, yeah?) compliment your lines. Or if that's toning added after the fact, it does a heck of a nice job.

    Are there any particular resources you would recommend for studying architecture, or perhaps applying perspective to your work? Or is it just a whole lot of "look and draw it" on top of the foundations? I think all of the concepts behind perspective are fairly straightforward, but I've found they can be tedious to actually work with, and I still trip over things even in the process of setting up my lines and so on. This is all seriously gorgeous though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zen-Fehr View Post
    Saying you need to focus on other stuff more is fair-- from what I can see, your figure drawings look pretty nice, if not as mind blowing as some of the stuff on site.
    Well, part of the reason I came back here after being away for a while is recognizing that after some success in the past my art career has kind of hit a rough patch and could use a bit of jump-starting. People come here to learn, and even those of us who have been working for a while still need to keep learning and getting better. When I was still in college I was doing a ton of figure drawing so I'm no stranger to it. I guess the main thing that I'm thinking is that I don't want to be a one-trick pony so I need to diversify.

    Also, I need to start working on making some finished pieces.

    A lot of people dump a ton of time into it though, and the majority of this sketchbook seems to be focused on buildings and so on, so it makes sense that's where the feedback is oriented. Your perspective is amazing, but I have to say I'm just as much captivated by how well your undersketches (markers, yeah?) compliment your lines. Or if that's toning added after the fact, it does a heck of a nice job.
    Yes, those are markers. I usually use a light cool gray (30% or so) to sketch out the basic shapes, the same light gray as well as a mid gray (40-60%) and dark gray (70-80%) to block in the lights and darks, and then use a fine-point sharpie pen to get a few details.

    Are there any particular resources you would recommend for studying architecture, or perhaps applying perspective to your work? Or is it just a whole lot of "look and draw it" on top of the foundations? I think all of the concepts behind perspective are fairly straightforward, but I've found they can be tedious to actually work with, and I still trip over things even in the process of setting up my lines and so on. This is all seriously gorgeous though.
    Most of what I learned about perspective I got from some awesome instructors at a school that will basically drill perspective into your mind so deep that you will see 3D perspective lines in your dreams. Not kidding; I still have dreams where the world around me is drawn through to vanishing points but could be moved through like 3D space in a video game.

    However, there was a textbook that we used, let me find a link for you. Aha, found it. I don't think I used the textbook that much, but that's partially because the teachers were good enough that I never felt I needed it.

    Anyway, though, its not just one way or the other: you have to learn the rules, but you also have to apply them, which means getting out and drawing things that you see.


    As a side note, I just noticed your handle on here. Is "Fehr" your last name, and if so, do you know if you have an ancestor named "Friedrich" from Karlsruhe, Germany? Off the top of my head I believe the Friedrich Fehr I'm thinking of would have been born in the 1860's and died somewhere in the 1920's

    Last edited by Peter Coene; September 1st, 2014 at 04:47 PM.
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    Aaa nope. x:

    When I came up with Fehr it was (for me) just a shortened sound from the word wayfarer (long thought-process there), so I thought it was pretty nifty when I learned it was an actual name. What's the story behind this Friedrich fella?

    And thanks for linking the book! Looks balls expensive, but I've probably spent money on dumber things, and it's always super sweet when someone takes the time to share any part of their learning process.

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    These are awesome! Love that bird eye view of the parade on what I guess is bourbon street ..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gibier View Post
    These are awesome! Love that bird eye view of the parade on what I guess is bourbon street ..
    Not exactly. If you notice, you can seethe front of what looks like St. Louis Cathedral in the bg. Bourbon St. is a few blocks behind the cathedral. That piece though is entirely fantasy; the cathedral is way taller than it is in actual life, and I totally made up the buildings, just basing them on typical New Orleans French Quarter architecture. Also, there are no actual Mardi Gras parades with floats that get anywhere near that extravagant in the FQ, not to mention that most parade floats are pulled by tractors, rather than giant ogres

    Quote Originally Posted by Zen-Fehr View Post
    Aaa nope. x:

    When I came up with Fehr it was (for me) just a shortened sound from the word wayfarer (long thought-process there), so I thought it was pretty nifty when I learned it was an actual name. What's the story behind this Friedrich fella?
    The gallery that we work at specializes in 19th century art, and we have a couple paintings made by Friedrich Fehr, one from the late 1800's when he was still in Munich (possibly when he was still a student) and one from WW1 when he was an art professor in Karlsruhe. I've been researching him a bit to try and figure out more about the paintings and when I saw your online name it made me curious. His style changed immensely over the course of his career and despite not being as well known he had a huge effect on the development of German art, so I've found him very interesting. (He had students who went on to be major players in German secession movements like expressionism)

    And thanks for linking the book! Looks balls expensive, but I've probably spent money on dumber things, and it's always super sweet when someone takes the time to share any part of their learning process.
    No problem. I might draw up a few instructional bits for the perspective stuff; I swear its really easy once you get it figured out.

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    Hah. Finally got some time to look up some of Friedrich Fehr's work. It's lovely (a bit of brushwork to envy, for sure), and I'd certainly like to dig in and find someplace where there's a larger body of his work on display. Bit of organization is nice when it comes to checking out style transitions and so on.

    If you did put together any sort of instructional stuff on perspective, I'd probably do flips. Otherwise, the stuff you're posting is pretty dang inspiring as is.

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  31. #20
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    Your perspective is amazing, but I find mor intersting the simple strength of your pantone (?) + thin marker (?). It looks so polite and architectural but at the same time the gray is so free and energetic, and raw. This make me regret to not go around with paper and markets everytime... Thanx for inspiration. I'll be curious to see this technic applied to characters. Some premilinar sketches in Skyrim was made like that and are so old school and contemporary at the same time...

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    Great technical skills regarding the architectural work but like others have already said, it doesnt quite translate into your figure work (which is still pretty good).

    I dont think you should feel like you have to worry about mastering every aspect of art as everyone has their strengths and in your case the architectural/perspective work is truly impressive.

    Im sure if you focus on any other skill set you will get to grips with it fairly easily.

    Great work, thanks for sharing

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlindLynx View Post
    I'll be curious to see this technic applied to characters. Some premilinar sketches in Skyrim was made like that and are so old school and contemporary at the same time...
    Well, usually if I'm using marker on characters its just in some of the preliminary thumbs trying to block in some fun shapes. I'll usually draw more in pencil with them before choosing a final look and then rendering that out digitally. An example of a previous character where I brought the grey tone markers into the sketches can be found here

    Quote Originally Posted by Mothman View Post
    Great technical skills regarding the architectural work but like others have already said, it doesnt quite translate into your figure work (which is still pretty good).
    I've found that I can't quite get the same thing I want out of the markers for figurative work, so for that I usually resort to pencil. I'm not really in a position to get life drawing models, so most of what you're seeing there was sketched at a fashion show; in cases like that the models don't stand still for as long as the buildings so I have to resort to the best gesture I can get, then draw in the rest from memory.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mothman View Post
    I dont think you should feel like you have to worry about mastering every aspect of art as everyone has their strengths and in your case the architectural/perspective work is truly impressive.

    Im sure if you focus on any other skill set you will get to grips with it fairly easily.

    Great work, thanks for sharing
    Well, focusing on other areas is what I've got to do, because right now I'd like to get back into working studio positions in the game industry, but I've found that the best studios, especially in the areas I want to work in, seem to want something more. The trick is finding time.

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    Wonderful concepts! I would like to see something more finished though

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    I just cannot even begin to understand how you even start those sketches.

    Wonderful sketchbook, I love your medium choices too.

    Do you think you could, next time you're out sketching from life, take a bunch of photos really early on when you're laying your first marks? I'm very curious how you lay out and get started. Thanks.

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  42. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by HAJiME View Post
    I just cannot even begin to understand how you even start those sketches.

    Wonderful sketchbook, I love your medium choices too.

    Do you think you could, next time you're out sketching from life, take a bunch of photos really early on when you're laying your first marks? I'm very curious how you lay out and get started. Thanks.
    I'll try to remember, but I can tell you right now how I start. The 1st mark on those perspective pieces is always figuring out the horizon line. Lower horizon lines mean the viewer will be looking up, higher means looking down. For example, if you are in a sitting position on level with the 1st floor wanting to show a 3 story building you will probably have a lower horizon line.

    After the horizon line is drawn in I will use a few simple marks to indicate where the major parts of the structure are when compared with the horizon, and then estimate (often holding my ruler up in the air to line it up with the major lines in the structure) the angle of the lines in the structure to figure out the vanishing points. Once those are established, the rest is just a matter of marking in the shapes from general to specific, and then finally hitting a few details with the fine point black sharpie pen.

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  44. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by HAJiME View Post
    Do you think you could, next time you're out sketching from life, take a bunch of photos really early on when you're laying your first marks? I'm very curious how you lay out and get started. Thanks.
    Sometimes I'm a nice guy

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    So, I wasn't working from the photo, but I took this photo of the building slightly before I started working on the sketch to give you an idea of the building I was working from. It started raining right after taking the photo so I moved under an awning. Sorry, that changes the POV a little bit. Just a bit of historical info; this building, "the Cabildo" was the seat of government when Nola belonged to the Spanish in the 1700's, its where the Louisiana purchase was signed in the early 1800's, its been a government building, a courthouse, a jail, and today is a museum.
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    Here are the photos of the drawing towards the beginning. If you notice; I started with the horizon line, blocked in the major shapes and then worked from general to specific.
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    And this is a scan of where it ended up. Yes, I have a lot of goof-ups, and was rushing because even though I was under a balcony/gallery awning I was still getting we from the rain. I put up with that shit so all y'all could get what you asked for.

    edit: oh yeah, another interesting note about this building, for all you Disney fans: this scene from "Princess and the Frog" happened under one of those arches.

    Last edited by Peter Coene; September 5th, 2014 at 09:54 PM.
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  46. #28
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    Haha what no ogres in New Orleans? Wrong ward maybe? I would love to see you getting your characters on the same level as your buildings! Unless of course it is not your intention!

    Last edited by Gibier; September 6th, 2014 at 12:08 AM.
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  48. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gibier View Post
    Haha what no ogres in New Orleans? Wrong ward maybe?
    Or wrong faubourg or parish... We have lots of things, but I'm pretty sure no ogres. However, the area is known for its large flying cockroaches, nutria rats, alligators, voodoo queens, loup garou, zombies, ghosts, and vampires.

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    Fantastic.

    Love the historical info too.

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