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  1. #1
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    Beginner's Drawing Adventures

    ----- New sketches at the end! ----

    Hi, everyone. After a long debate with myself (and my printer) I decided to start a sketchbook here hoping that it will motivate me to draw every day. I am a complete beginner: even though I did draw in childhood and in high school (well, school assignments and random doodles), I never really studied any fundamentals or had any formal training in art.

    I am starting from rock bottom here and would really like to improve so any feedback or advice is more than welcome. I intend to draw something every day (the second post should cover my "attempts" from the last week though) and hopefully will post everything there every few days or so.

    I always wanted to try a bit of animation but I acknowledge that it is much too big of a goal to have right now with my abilities so I will focus on a smaller aims (for instance, that frustrating face drawing...).

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    Last edited by Mystical Sister; September 20th, 2014 at 04:24 AM.


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  3. #2
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    Hi , good start to sketch book its good you doing head studies that help a ton with portraits, I am no expert but a little tip is to flip the picture your working on by looking at your drawing in a mirror so it reverse the picture and lets you brain sort of see it in a fresh/new way it can really help to catch any distortion or big mistakes at any stage of the picture ( hope that made sense lol) , ,all so only a suggestion but it maybe if you like check out some the old masters painter portraits and even doing a few short studies of some you like in particular I happen to like Rembrandts portraits and I found doing even short copys of a few of them very helpful ,as I say I am no expert just some friendly suggestions ,all the best and keep up the good work and keep posting !

  4. #3
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    Good start! I've also just started my drawing adventure so I feel your pain just keep studying the fundamentals and practice practice practice!

  5. #4
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    The still lifes are my favourite, they look very good for a beginner!

  6. #5
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    Welcome, nice start, keep them coming keep posting work hard explore!
    I like the size you post, don't make them to big, you have a good feeling
    for value, amazing sketches here with pencil !

  7. #6
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    Hello! Lovely sketchbook. I especially like that you are writing and telling us what you're struggling with and such. Helps us critique AND helps us identify where we share struggles and can learn from one another. Don't be afraid to post in other people's sketchbooks though - there's something to be learnt from everyone, even if it's just personal tastes, because if the majority of people don't like/do like your choice of colour, for example, thats useful input!

    Re: observational drawing - it doesn't have to take ages and you NEED to do it. The point of it is that it forces you to notice stuff you cannot see by just looking.

    I think you need to check out pixellovley - I only just discovered this myself, it was a suggestion someone gave in my sketchbook. It will show you an image for only a short period of time, so you have to train yourself to capture the parts of the image that say the most about it's form. This will speed you up, is quick so there's no excuse for not giving it a go and really, really useful. A lot of the trouble you're having is distortion, probably because you're spending too long getting too involved with the images too early on when sketching them out. This will help. Try doing the same from life, also. Grab yourself an object or sit in front of a scene or corner of a room and set a timer for 2 minutes and just capture the main, crucial forms and lines quickly. Don't worry about it being a mess or unfinished, you need those messy unfinished scribbles to learn by doing, not by finished product.

    Whilst drawing every day, all day, is the best way to improve it's not practical for most of us. Draw when you can, but don't feel forced to spend ages on studies that bore you to death every single day.
    Art Blog | CA Sketchbook

    True progress means matching the world to the vision in our heads.
    But we always change the vision instead.

  8. #7
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    Your shoes are super great, I don't draw like that you know!
    Thanks for swinging by, I needed that belly rub cause I am
    getting teared apart by some pretty straight forward crits,
    which is what makes me post here, but sometimes it's
    demoralizing if you don't get what they are talking about!

    Love your Tree man, if you like my eco stuff here's some more:
    www.iveno.de/ecow.swf maybe you can submit a drawing ?!?
    I would post it on the fan page there, it would be the first drawing!!
    Msg if you are interested !!

    Draw the change you want to see in the world, and if you like to
    animate at the end you can see an animation I did with Nintendo DS.
    Pretty cool this program on there called flip note studio! Just start by
    having fun; There is the secret ingredient !

  9. #8
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    HAJiME - hi, thanks for dropping by. It‘s true that I don‘t comment very often (I just feel a bit too beginner to criticize anyone yet), but I understand your point. I will try to visit more people .

    As for observational drawing , I didn‘t mean to say that I will stop doing it completely; I‘ll just do less of those because they really eat all my free time, so to say. I just looked through the website you suggested, and it looks great! The distortion problem in my drawings really bothers me too (some of them really look like they are about to fall down, aren‘t they?), as well as the time that I spend for each drawing, so it‘s a relief to hear that both „habits“ can be fixed. Thanks for the advice, it‘s very helpful.


    By the way, perhaps you know how those figures should really look like in the sketches? I mean, I see some people drawing sticky figures, others do almost contour drawings; and then there are those who scribble almost incomprehensible figures in order to capture the gesture alone (according to Nicolaides‘ book). I‘m a bit lost which way would be better in my case...


    --


    iven – thanks, I hope one day my drawings from imagination will be as believable as these objects from my observational drawing (that „treeman“ is a lady, by the way, but that‘s not really important, haha). Listening to critics can be hard but the way I see it, at least in this site, it is mostly to make you improve. I mean, if they bother to critique your works at all, it means that your works are worth the time they put to write you that critical advice. That‘s a good sign. It might take a bit of time to really get what they want to say, but I am sure in the long run critics will only help you to improve.

    I respect people who try to initiate some change in the world through their drawings and I do believe that ecology is a very interesting theme to explore artistically if an artist is genuinely passionate about it. I, however, am just starting and would like to try all kinds of approaches to art before settling on one particular theme. Your website looks really nice though, and the kids would probably like it. Just one suggestion – I would try to think of some more tools to attract children’s‘ attention than just drawing. I remember when I was at school we used to draw based on ecological theme on many occasions (biology lessons, friendly competitions, Earth day, etc.)... it might be just my school but it was quite a lot. Since you like animation, maybe some interactive mini game would improve your website? Just a friendly idea .
    My sketchbook.

    There is no secret ingredient. (Po)

  10. #9
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    Thanks for stopping by my sketchbook!

    Wow, a huge improvement in here in a short space - from the perspective studies and the house on down. lovely stuff. Your studies are beautiful - you have a good idea for value and form. I'd normally say don't be so hard on yourself but in your case, I think it's a good thing. you'll push yourself father and harder that way, so yeah, keep pushing lol.

    Re studies from life. If you feel overwhelmed by too big a subject you can use a viewfinder, or just make a rectangle using your hands, to frame a composition you like and work only on that. I find that helps a lot when doing landscapes. If you use a viewfinder, it's also handy when doing architecture for finding verticals, angles, perspective lines etc.

    Re Loomis. The guy's method is a good one but it's a bit limiting. Or I found it to be anyway. If you want to add to his head construction method, check out Stan Prokopenko's blog - http://www.stanprokopenko.com/blog/?...+draw+the+head and whatever you cant find about the Reilly method online. The second one adds more abstract plane/construction lines that help build the form of the head without bogging you down in a single artist's stylisation. They both helped me a lot.

    Anyway, just some thoughts, hope they help a little. Good luck with everything and keep posting!

  11. #10
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    Thanks for stopping by my SB. We all feel lost and don't know what to do sometimes. I'd recommend concerning less about contour and more about structure. Once you can figure out the structure or underlying shape of something then I think you have a better ability to manipulate contours so they become more descriptive. Hope that makes sense. Keep at it.

  12. #11
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    Hello Mystical sister,

    Great start on your sketchbook. I really enjoy the still life's you're doing and the edging towards the caricatures (the man with the big smile). Just draw and bit by bit raise the bar.
    Good luck. I'll be visiting your sketchbook later.
    On a discovery voyage in drawing wonderland.
    Feel free to check out my sketchbook and leave a comment. I like the feedback to draw lessons from.

  13. #12
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    Hi there, thanks for visiting my sketchbook! I see some passionate struggle here, which is good. The improvement is certainly noticeable, I especially like your figure gestures from 29.09 and most of your observation drawings.
    When it comes to gesture drawings, I'm still learning myself, but I don't think there is a "right way" to do gestures. I see you tried more styles yourself, which is great for the start. I approached Villpu and Proko's method too, but I also use other methods sometimes or not even a specific one (I combine them - usually it's a mess). I'm currently trying to force myself to work in "steps", that is do the "spaghetti" lines first, to describe just the movement, after that, try finding some landmarks and in the end, adding some form/structure. It's hard cause I often get distracted by the next step...
    When it comes to portraits, I have done a lot of "copying" for some years, until I realised I knew nothing about the forms I was trying to depict. The most help I got was from Loomis and Proko lessons. Afterwards I found Michael Hampton's book "Figure Drawing - Design and Invention" which is also great when it comes to explaining construction, it has got the head, too.

    Keep up the good work, can't wait to see how your gestures and portraits will evolve
    Sketchbook - http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=277664

    "He who has a why to live can bear any how."

  14. #13
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    Hey guys, thank you for taking time to look through my sketchbook; I really appreciate it (you can always add some critique too, I think I can handle some!).

    (pindurski - hey, I'll just shortly clarify: by underlying structure you meant imagining figure as if constructed out of cubes etc? Thanks for advice
    Christof simons - caricatures? If you had in mind a man in #5, then it's not mine, I mentioned that I copied it from the Kato's video, heh. I'd love to know how to draw caricatures though, I haven't thought about it much. It must be fun!
    Aubergine - I like the idea of adding form after those "movement lines" but at the end I find it hard to actually get that form in correct places. Everything relies on the anatomy, I suppose... I need to add that to my list of future studies . Thanks for suggestions! As for the copying, I agree that it's important to know the structure first (especially for drawings from imagination..); however, people who draw very accurate images from photos still look kind of magical in my eyes. I don't know how it is even possible to achieve that kind of accuracy (my own observation drawings always retain some kind of subjectivity...).)

    I wasn't able to draw this week at all as I finally started to work and literally had no time (waking up at 6 and returning home around 8... and possible night shifts in the future!). I don't plan to quit drawing but I need to figure out how to manage my time better (and to find some closer place to live too if I am to retain my position, which I really really need ) even if it means to start drawing from zero all over again (I'm afraid to forget everything without practicing! Aand It's kind of sad to read comments there when I don't have anything new to show...). On the brighter side, I am happy to just get out of the house and look at real people instead of figures on the computer screen. Some interaction with an outside world might not be a bad thing, haha.

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    My sketchbook.

    There is no secret ingredient. (Po)

  15. #14
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    Lovely sketchbook! It's great seeing all the sketches and notes you're making in them. Keep it up with the loose lines and build from there!

  16. #15
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    MIA Dude if you ever come back, let me know I will check you Sb again!
    Great stuff in here, hope you keep it up!

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