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    This Wild And Crazy World

    Dunno if I can do this, but if I don't try it I won't learn anything. So here goes nothing. Hello everyone I'm here to advertise my newly self-published manga-esque comic-book titled "This Wild And Crazy World."

    "This Wild And Crazy World." Is a wild action oriented tale about two teenagers named Kenny and Amy who try to find their place in a world filled with aliens, monsters, angels, and various other worldly beings. All while engaging in a romantic relationship that leaves Kenny with a sense of uncertainty.

    You find it on this page: http://www.lulu.com/shop/nb-yomi/thi...-21760175.html All purchases will be made on lulu.com. Thank you for time and I look forward to the feedback.

    The following images are one of the heroines, Brittany fighting off monster and a promotional poster.


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    Last edited by Sardansson; August 18th, 2014 at 04:06 AM.
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  3. #2
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    Your link does not seem to work.

    You might get a better turnout if you posted some teaser images along with the text snippet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by arenhaus View Post
    Your link does not seem to work.

    You might get a better turnout if you posted some teaser images along with the text snippet.
    Thanks for the advice. And I fixed the link.

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    Are you serious?

    Anything unrelated to elephants is irrelephant.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiggeraz View Post
    Are you serious?
    Yep... Wouldn't have made this thread if I wasn't...

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    Well since you are serious and wanted feedback i am not gonna sugarcoat it for you, your 'manga-esque' comic book looks absolutely terrible. Not bad like, it needs some polishing in certain areas -bad, but bad like, you don't know how to draw -bad.
    The panels you shared show that you lack the skill and experience in drawing that would be necessary to draw a decent comic book. It's devoid of pretty much anything i'd expect from a comic book like this, correct anatomy, good composition, a compelling sense of motion and dynamic and so on. And storywise you just took the well known 'young teenagers have to fight monstas + romance'- formular that 88.9993% of every manga/anime in existence uses, instead of doing something original.

    If you are ready to create something beyond badly drawn MS paint comics i would recommend you to learn drawing. For an absolute beginner i suggest to read Andrew Loomis' "fun with a pencil" as a starting point. After that you might keep yourself busy with something more specific of the fundamentals like basic perspective: recommended here are Andrew Loomis' "Successful Drawing" or Scott Robertsons "How to draw".

    There is good reading matter on pretty much any topic of drawing and painting in this fine list. http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...s-Reading-List

    Summarized: you can't draw a good comic without knowing the fundamentals.

    Anything unrelated to elephants is irrelephant.

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  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiggeraz View Post
    Well since you are serious and wanted feedback i am not gonna sugarcoat it for you, your 'manga-esque' comic book looks absolutely terrible. Not bad like, it needs some polishing in certain areas -bad, but bad like, you don't know how to draw -bad.
    The panels you shared show that you lack the skill and experience in drawing that would be necessary to draw a decent comic book. It's devoid of pretty much anything i'd expect from a comic book like this, correct anatomy, good composition, a compelling sense of motion and dynamic and so on. And storywise you just took the well known 'young teenagers have to fight monstas + romance'- formular that 88.9993% of every manga/anime in existence uses, instead of doing something original.

    If you are ready to create something beyond badly drawn MS paint comics i would recommend you to learn drawing. For an absolute beginner i suggest to read Andrew Loomis' "fun with a pencil" as a starting point. After that you might keep yourself busy with something more specific of the fundamentals like basic perspective: recommended here are Andrew Loomis' "Successful Drawing" or Scott Robertsons "How to draw".

    There is good reading matter on pretty much any topic of drawing and painting in this fine list. http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...s-Reading-List

    Summarized: you can't draw a good comic without knowing the fundamentals.
    Thanks for the feedback, though I need to mention this. I know the fundamentals of drawing, after all I've taken art class in high school was taught loosely by my father, and looked up tutorials online and bought some how-to-draw-manga books. My problem has been patience... Right now I'm trying to earn money so I find my own place and leave my parents. I've been at that for six years now... I'll still utilize your feedback though since I'm also working on the first three volumes of a Halloween themed series I've been writing since 2009, but this? It's too late for this first issue

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sardansson View Post
    Thanks for the feedback, though I need to mention this. I know the fundamentals of drawing, after all I've taken art class in high school was taught loosely by my father, and looked up tutorials online and bought some how-to-draw-manga books. My problem has been patience... Right now I'm trying to earn money so I find my own place and leave my parents. I've been at that for six years now... I'll still utilize your feedback though since I'm also working on the first three volumes of a Halloween themed series I've been writing since 2009, but this? It's too late for this first issue
    You may think you know the fundamentals but your work tells exactly the opposite story, or you have an odd understanding of the word. And let me tell you, you don't lern the fundamentals by visiting one class or buying shitty how-to-draw-manga books, but by constantly studying and practicing over months and years.

    Don't be naive, just compare what you did with a manga that has a decent artist behind it. Or better, let me show you what i mean. First we have your attempt at manga:
    Name:  pageall.jpg
Views: 479
Size:  130.1 KB

    And here we have a real manga that shows that the artist is capable of drawing and creating something that is pleasing to the eye:
    Name:  berserk-28419.jpg
Views: 571
Size:  233.1 KB
    Name:  bers.jpg
Views: 492
Size:  124.5 KB
    As you can see the author and illustrator has a basic understanding of proportion, composition, perspective and rendering. And let me be so bold and hypothesize that he did NOT learn these by reading a 2$ how-to-draw-awsum-manga book but rather by learning how to draw in general.
    On the short call you're better off taking a minimum wage job than wasting your time drawing manga comics and trying to sell them. Even good artist and comic book illustrators struggle to make a living out of drawing and you are a world away from being a good artist.

    My apologies for sounding so harsh but you will waste your precious time trying to do something you don't understand. And if you want to be a comic book artist study the fundamentals.

    Anything unrelated to elephants is irrelephant.

    Sketchbook
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  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sardansson View Post
    I know the fundamentals of drawing, after all I've taken art class in high school was taught loosely by my father, and looked up tutorials online and bought some how-to-draw-manga books.
    Um... sorry, but you don't. High schools seldom teach the real drawing fundamentals, either, and buying books does not equal learning. You get points for effort and perseverance, but you need to learn to draw if you want to be competitive.

    If you have really managed to draw an entire book, no matter what the drawing quality, I'd say that your problem isn't patience, it's ability to see as an artist. You are imitating things poorly, instead of creating things.

    So get "Successful Drawing" by Loomis and practice structural drawing in pencil.

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  14. #10
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    Hey friend, I think I know how you might be feeling after some of these comments, and while I by no means do I want to undermine anything anyone has said, I reckon you need a little sugar, no?

    First of all, I want to say "good for you," for going ahead and publishing your work, that's a first step it takes many professionals in many fields a while to build up to.
    Second, it has to be admitted that your work could use some work.
    I'm not saying you're "bad" because bad implies it's something fundamental about you, but I am saying that you're inexperienced. That's okay, though, because if you've gone to the effort of creating an entire comic book, then clearly you love to draw, and that just means the road to being better will be enjoyable. Passion has no relation to the objective qualities of your artwork. If you love to draw, then you will draw, and your work will improve as if by accident.

    There are certain things you can do to accelerate the rate of your improvement. The first step is accepting that you need to improve. No artist should be arrogant. Even the best of the best know that there is no end point to their improvement besides death. If you keep going, the knowledge that you are ever moving forward will become part of what you love about art.

    It can be helpful to refer to the work of masters and read books on drawing, such as the above mentioned "Successful Drawing". Usually, for working on the fundamentals of figurative drawing, the go-to authors are Andrew Loomis and Burne Hogarth. Personally, I favour Loomis because he focuses on teaching you how to create images and figures out of shadow and shape, rather than lines. He teaches you how to sculpt in 2D. I also just think his work is much more pleasing to the eye.

    You're clearly a fan of Manga.
    The problem many people who love very specific styles like that run into is that they want to draw in that style from the beginning. They often say that they only draw Manga anyway, so they don't need/want to focus on the fundamentals, they will just draw cartoons forever. The thing is, if you ask any of your favourite Manga artists to draw something in a realistic style, they will absolutely be able to comply.
    Often, to be able to give your preferred art style the reverence it deserves, you should be able to draw realistically first so that you can properly understand what stylistic changes you need to make and what your own personal flair can add to the work. You will find that most artists don't favour just one style. They appreciate the merits of many art forms.

    This is just my advice. Take up your pencil, and do what you love. Draw. Keep drawing, but understand that there are paths you can take that will catalyze the rate of your improvement.

    Last edited by SteveZissou; August 19th, 2014 at 07:05 PM.
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  16. #11
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    To add to Steve, don't be disheartened, we all have to start somewhere. Currently you draw like most 12yos but with a lot of hard work I'm sure you'll be able to improve quickly. Now, while you're doing that, think of some twists to your story that will make it stand out of the crowd. Why is Kenny uncertain? Does he think Amy might be a body double for an alien, and does it really matter? Do they have dinner parties with monsters invited and what are their table manners like? Are the angels sightly pissed off with having to be good all the time, and do they have a sense of humour? Side characters are very important if you want your world to be believable.

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  17. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiggeraz View Post
    You may think you know the fundamentals but your work tells exactly the opposite story, or you have an odd understanding of the word. And let me tell you, you don't lern the fundamentals by visiting one class or buying shitty how-to-draw-manga books, but by constantly studying and practicing over months and years.

    Don't be naive, just compare what you did with a manga that has a decent artist behind it. Or better, let me show you what i mean. First we have your attempt at manga:
    Name:  pageall.jpg
Views: 479
Size:  130.1 KB

    And here we have a real manga that shows that the artist is capable of drawing and creating something that is pleasing to the eye:
    Name:  berserk-28419.jpg
Views: 571
Size:  233.1 KB
    Name:  bers.jpg
Views: 492
Size:  124.5 KB
    As you can see the author and illustrator has a basic understanding of proportion, composition, perspective and rendering. And let me be so bold and hypothesize that he did NOT learn these by reading a 2$ how-to-draw-awsum-manga book but rather by learning how to draw in general.
    On the short call you're better off taking a minimum wage job than wasting your time drawing manga comics and trying to sell them. Even good artist and comic book illustrators struggle to make a living out of drawing and you are a world away from being a good artist.

    My apologies for sounding so harsh but you will waste your precious time trying to do something you don't understand. And if you want to be a comic book artist study the fundamentals.
    I get why you think I don't understand the fundamentals because you can only go by what I've shown. Like I said I wanted to get that issue done so I could start selling it. And I get that I made the mistake the mistake of advertising it here of all places. I'll need to put it somewhere where I can actually sell it. Printing is my best bet, but I'll need to earn money for that.

    Quote Originally Posted by arenhaus View Post
    Um... sorry, but you don't. High schools seldom teach the real drawing fundamentals, either, and buying books does not equal learning. You get points for effort and perseverance, but you need to learn to draw if you want to be competitive.

    If you have really managed to draw an entire book, no matter what the drawing quality, I'd say that your problem isn't patience, it's ability to see as an artist. You are imitating things poorly, instead of creating things.

    So get "Successful Drawing" by Loomis and practice structural drawing in pencil.
    Thanks for the link, and I refuse to continue trying to argue this point. Fact of the matter is I made the mistake of advertising this here, I need to take it elsewhere... I'm looking to earn some money and it's blatantly obvious I won't be able to do that here with this.

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveZissou View Post
    Hey friend, I think I know how you might be feeling after some of these comments, and while I by no means do I want to undermine anything anyone has said, I reckon you need a little sugar, no?

    First of all, I want to say "good for you," for going ahead and publishing your work, that's a first step it takes many professionals in many fields a while to build up to.
    Second, it has to be admitted that your work could use some work.
    I'm not saying you're "bad" because bad implies it's something fundamental about you, but I am saying that you're inexperienced. That's okay, though, because if you've gone to the effort of creating an entire comic book, then clearly you love to draw, and that just means the road to being better will be enjoyable. Passion has no relation to the objective qualities of your artwork. If you love to draw, then you will draw, and your work will improve as if by accident.

    There are certain things you can do to accelerate the rate of your improvement. The first step is accepting that you need to improve. No artist should be arrogant. Even the best of the best know that there is no end point to their improvement besides death. If you keep going, the knowledge that you are ever moving forward will become part of what you love about art.

    It can be helpful to refer to the work of masters and read books on drawing, such as the above mentioned "Successful Drawing". Usually, for working on the fundamentals of figurative drawing, the go-to authors are Andrew Loomis and Burne Hogarth. Personally, I favour Loomis because he focuses on teaching you how to create images and figures out of shadow and shape, rather than lines. He teaches you how to sculpt in 2D. I also just think his work is much more pleasing to the eye.

    You're clearly a fan of Manga.
    The problem many people who love very specific styles like that run into is that they want to draw in that style from the beginning. They often say that they only draw Manga anyway, so they don't need/want to focus on the fundamentals, they will just draw cartoons forever. The thing is, if you ask any of your favourite Manga artists to draw something in a realistic style, they will absolutely be able to comply.
    Often, to be able to give your preferred art style the reverence it deserves, you should be able to draw realistically first so that you can properly understand what stylistic changes you need to make and what your own personal flair can add to the work. You will find that most artists don't favour just one style. They appreciate the merits of many art forms.

    This is just my advice. Take up your pencil, and do what you love. Draw. Keep drawing, but understand that there are paths you can take that will catalyze the rate of your improvement.
    Like I said I'm not gonna argue this point any further... I posted this in hopes of making some money, but I neglected to keep in mind the expectation this place has. In hindsight I should've presented something that better proportioned character designs and backgrounds. Also I get the coloring is off. Trust me I looked over it several times, I get what's wrong with it. Hence why I need to advertise it elsewhere, so I can make the money first, improve the later issues... wash, lather, rinse, repeat...

    Quote Originally Posted by Black Spot View Post
    To add to Steve, don't be disheartened, we all have to start somewhere. Currently you draw like most 12yos but with a lot of hard work I'm sure you'll be able to improve quickly. Now, while you're doing that, think of some twists to your story that will make it stand out of the crowd. Why is Kenny uncertain? Does he think Amy might be a body double for an alien, and does it really matter? Do they have dinner parties with monsters invited and what are their table manners like? Are the angels sightly pissed off with having to be good all the time, and do they have a sense of humour? Side characters are very important if you want your world to be believable.
    I'll explain to you in a private message why the story sounds as senseless as it does, but right now I need to get back to trying to sell this thing, so I'll take it elsewhere.

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  18. #13
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    Now you're delusional. No one is going to buy it as is. We tried to be nice, but sticking your fingers in your ears and shouting, La-la-la I can't hear you." is not going to help.

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