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  1. #1
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    Setting up a schedule?

    I'm a college student and I've been drawing somewhat seriously and self teaching myself for about half a year now. I'm seeing some progress, but nothing huge. I want to make a daily schedule of what I'm going to draw during the course of the day. Can anyone give me some pointers?
    I was thinking along the lines of:
    Mondays - Line, proportion, shapes
    Tuesdays - Construction and gesture
    Wednesdays - Follow up with anatomy from Tuesday
    Thursdays - Perspective and Composition
    Friday - Value and color (in the future)
    Saturday/Sunday - Rest or creative works and extra study.
    I still consider myself a complete beginner still trying to solidify my fundamentals whilst trying to maintain an anime like style.
    Any tips would be greatly appreciated!

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  3. #2
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    I think that is a bad idea. You cannot practice construction without perspective, you cannot practice composition without proportions and value, etc. - in short, you cannot practice an isolated thing. Any drawing includes all of what you listed, and you shouldn't shoehorn it into an exercise in single element.

    Set up a still life with a single artificial light source, and draw it, paying attention to line, proportion, shapes, construction, gesture, perspective, composition, value and color. Ideally, everything you draw should be an exercise in fundamental skills.

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    Quote Originally Posted by arenhaus View Post
    You cannot practice construction without perspective, you cannot practice composition without proportions and value, etc. - in short, you cannot practice an isolated thing.
    True, but you can study a specific aspect of drawing on its on for focused improvement. Naturally the various sub-disciplines will bleed into each other; you will end up practicing perspective even when you're working on anatomy, and you will naturally practice composition when working on perspective, etc. But I can't imagine a drawing program (that works) that doesn't have a perspective-specific class/project/unit.

    For the OP, my advice is - don't overwhelm yourself. It's common for excited artists to try to learn everything at once, become dismally aware of how much they have yet to learn, burn themselves out, and give up (or have to take a long break to recharge). It's okay to study one or two fundamental areas at a time, and you will see progress more quickly in those specific areas than if you spread yourself across all the fundamentals at once.

    And I second the suggestion for doing still life studies from life. Keep in mind that human anatomy is pretty complex and can be difficult to grasp if you're still struggling with perspective and constructing basic shapes. Since you consider yourself a beginner still, it might be better to start with simple forms, learn how to draw them in correct perspective from imagination and life, and work your way up to more complicated subjects like humans and animals. And still life studies can continue to teach you as you move into values, color, texture, edges, etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dierat View Post
    And I second the suggestion for doing still life studies from life. Keep in mind that human anatomy is pretty complex and can be difficult to grasp if you're still struggling with perspective and constructing basic shapes. Since you consider yourself a beginner still, it might be better to start with simple forms, learn how to draw them in correct perspective from imagination and life, and work your way up to more complicated subjects like humans and animals. And still life studies can continue to teach you as you move into values, color, texture, edges, etc.
    That's what I was sort of aiming at, more focused exercises whilst using everything else that is related to it.
    But in terms of life studies, does it matter what I study for still lifes? Like what would be a very effective series of still lifes to draw? I remember in drawing class not too long ago that I did a crumpled piece of paper and I found that to be an extremely helpful exercise for seeing values, shapes, proportion and line.
    Thanks for the replies so far

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    Bascuit. In my opinion you should devout 80% of your free time to learning one aspect of concept art from either life, book, or teacher, and then spend the remaining 20% of your time learning at your discretion what seem fun to you at that moment. I would definitely advice against tackling all of it at once for many reasons. One being that it will be highly discouraging when you are improvements are are not as swift as expected because you did not focus on one thing. After you've learnt the aspect that you've devoted 80% of your time to to a acceptable level, then you should move on to a different aspect. Simply my opinion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bascuit View Post
    But in terms of life studies, does it matter what I study for still lifes? Like what would be a very effective series of still lifes to draw?
    I think it's good to start with simple geometric forms - cubes, cylinders, and spheres. They're the building blocks of constructive drawing, so being familiar with how they exist in space and react to light will be very beneficial later on, and it's great perspective practice. (You can make them out of paper or cardboard or find objects around the house that are similar - boxes or books instead of cubes and cans instead of cylinders.) Try to avoid objects with lots of surface detail at first (like glass or other reflective materials) so you can focus on the form. Then start pulling in objects that are somewhat more complex and practice breaking them down into the simpler construction forms when planning them out, and slowly start bringing in objects with different kinds of texture that you can practice as well.

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    You should do creative work every day. Work it up a little at a time, brain storming ideas etc, describe what you want to draw, then try to draw it. What you need to study is revealed in what's lacking in your imaginative work, and this could be all kinds of different things. What you can't imagine is what you need to pay attention to in real life. If you have an hour to study every day then it should be 30 minutes creative work, then 30 minutes studying things that would make that imaginative stuff better.

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