Mewtwo

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Thread: Mewtwo

  1. #1
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    Red face Mewtwo

    Decided to have a little fun with photoshop and draw from imagination.

    This is a more realistic version of mewtwo. I'd still love some feedback. I'm always open to any advice that will help me improve.Name:  MewtwoFinished.jpg
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Size:  609.6 KB

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  3. #2
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    Its good, but i think your missing hue shift, (even tho i see theres some purple shift, i just dont think there is enough of it) to 'crystalize' the surface.

    its hard for me to say how to get it exactly, i cheat this bitcrushing system, but i just tried to work yours a bit (it looks perfect to work on) but i cant make my real stuff, not just with gimp.

    I havent learnt how to do realism without using a custom program that does it for me, but it just gets hue shift. I dunno if anyone else could help you out, because theres plenty of guys here making the good stuff. I only know how to make it one special way. and its kinda cheating.

    Here I did a demo, it turned out shit but Id like to think its an extra 5%.... i wish i could help you, but i dont know how to paint without help.

    Best I could manage (and I think it gets there in the end) is to take and add rgb individually until you get the exact 'cream' balance you want.

    And one of my special fx ones.

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    Last edited by digydan1; August 11th, 2014 at 03:12 AM.
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  4. #3
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    Recommended book: "Successful Drawing" by Loomis. Practice structural drawing, perspective, lighting and anatomy.

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    Which do you think I need the most work on?

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    i guess maybe some more realistic occlusions, its all pretty flat black outlines, that would help

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  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MisterLopes View Post
    Which do you think I need the most work on?
    Start with structural drawing and perspective. The rest follows from them.

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    See your comment really made me think about this. I looked up the book you suggested. I started studying. I watched a few videos. And they're all telling me how I can put certain shapes into perspective but I'm finding it difficult to wrap my mind around putting a figure like this into perspective. Do you think if I had a horizon line with some background it might help out?

    Can you give me an example of someone else's work? Maybe something that relates to this one, so I can compare and see what I could've done?

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  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by MisterLopes View Post
    See your comment really made me think about this. I looked up the book you suggested. I started studying. I watched a few videos. And they're all telling me how I can put certain shapes into perspective but I'm finding it difficult to wrap my mind around putting a figure like this into perspective. Do you think if I had a horizon line with some background it might help out?

    Can you give me an example of someone else's work? Maybe something that relates to this one, so I can compare and see what I could've done?
    A horizon line is necessary for perspective, yes. As for background - you don't need anything complex, but it helps to have at least some random perspective lines to aid your thinking and serve as guidelines. You need to think of the viewing angle, first of all: where is the figure in the relation to the viewer? The rest - the position of the horizon, the picture plane, the angular spread of view - all follow from the relative position of the eye and the picture center.

    The rest, e. g. the principal VPs position, follows from the orientation of the subject relative to the line between the eye and the picture center.

    As for how to transition from basic forms in perspective to putting a figure in perspective, you simplify the figure. For example, a standing figure always fits within an upright bounding box. You can position that box, using the front-back and left-right planes of the figure, relative to the viewer. (Drawing the centerlines of the box's faces gives a clear idea of where the axis of symmetry is, and helps to keep the proportions right.) And then you find smaller and smaller forms within it. After all, if a figure can be described by a bounding box, then its chest or head can be described by smaller bounding boxes. So you end up with an approximation of the figure built from boxes, or perhaps from boxes, cylinders, truncated cones. These give you the orientation and perspective for the body parts. Usually that's enough to get a clear idea of what angle every body part is seen from, and proceed with smaller things like major muscle groups, the hand and fingers, the form of the nose or jaw, etc. - putting smaller forms in the perspective of their larger containing form.

    But first, make sure you can plot a cube and arbitrary-size box from any angle, correctly, and inscribe a cylinder and a sphere in the box, again from any angle. With enough practice that will let you eyeball nearly anything without resorting to a ruler all the time, and train you to think of everything in terms of perspective.

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    Here's a centuries-old example of reducing the figure into simpler forms:

    Mewtwo

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    Awesome. I'm actually getting a clearer idea of how to initialize this. I've been reading into it and watching some videos and getting good advice from some other people too.

    I'll start a new piece today with the idea of perspective in mind.


    Thanks again!

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