Constructive painting tutorials?

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    Constructive painting tutorials?

    There are threads and demos for constructive drawing, but not painting (at least that I've found). I've searched, but can't turn up anything. Nobody calls it that in the titles, which is part of the problem (searching CA turns up endless threads asking for constructive crit). What I'm looking for is the names of some artists who demo the techniques, or even better, links to some. Doesn't matter if they're vids or text based (or books). Links to threads with good discussion are also extremely welcome - I've found some excellent info on old threads here, just not on this subject (well, tantalizingly little anyway).

    Is it simple and I'm overcomplicating it? Is it just a matter of breaking things down into simple forms and describing them using big brushes with as few strokes as possible? Any insight is much appreciated.

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    Any painting is based on the same constructive principles as drawing, actually. There is no clear line between them. Tonal drawings approach monochrome paintings without a clear distinction other than traditional split by technique: pencil = drawing, oil = painting, even if the pencil drawing is tonal and the oil was used to make a line drawing. That split makes no logical sense, it is mere linguistics.

    Both painting and drawing will benefit from clear perspective, defining lit planes, describing forms, etc.

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    Ok thanks - that makes sense.

    I guess I was confusing it with a particular way of painting I see a lot of people doing around here - you know the sort of speedpaint/ concept art approach built up rapidly from broad strokes. That's what I'm really looking for tutorials on - I thought it was actually called constructive painting, but I guess it's just one way to approach it. It seems like a really good way to train your skills.

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    I suppose it is usually called "speedpainting" nowadays. It mostly focuses on values, but not much on structure or precision, so calling it constructive painting would not be quite correct.

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    Wow, this is difficult to get across! I know there are speed paint techniques that are more loose and sloppy or whatever, but I often see techniques that are at the same time somewhat loose but structurally sound - like the way Fireblade does paintovers. You know, where you can see overlapping edges of semi-transparent strokes in areas, but other areas are more tight. So, a pretty specific type of speed paint that is still constructive, or at least it seems like it is.

    Ah man - it's really late - I need to crawl off to bed, and I'm not capable of composing my thoughts any better than that right now.

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    Darkstrider,

    Are you in a life drawing class?

    Have you copied over Bridgman's anatomy books into your notebooks a few pages a night?

    I'm asking because I don't think I'm seeing real observational and anatomical knowledge in your pictures. And you won't be able to do the kind of construction you are talking about unless you have the blueprints for what you want to construct first in your mind. When you simply work from photo ref, without this reservoir of info already in your mind, you won't know what to draw, or what not to draw, or what to emphasize or de-emphasize in your drawing. All good drawing, constructive or linear is about deftly articulating what you already know.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darkstrider View Post
    Wow, this is difficult to get across! I know there are speed paint techniques that are more loose and sloppy or whatever, but I often see techniques that are at the same time somewhat loose but structurally sound - like the way Fireblade does paintovers. You know, where you can see overlapping edges of semi-transparent strokes in areas, but other areas are more tight. So, a pretty specific type of speed paint that is still constructive, or at least it seems like it is.
    I don't think that's a specific type of painting. If you have a solid grasp of foundation skills, then it will be visible in your painting just like in your drawing, no matter how quick the painting is. If you do not, then you may be able to figure out a similar result much slower, with conscious planning.

    In fact, that's how you learn: by doing something consciously and deliberately, until it sinks down into your subconscious and becomes ingrained. Then you become able to do it quickly and intuitively.

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    Ok, thanks guys.

    Kev - life drawing, no - Bridgeman, I'm about halfway through Constructive Anatomy, and I will be getting back to it. Need to get back to my cast drawings too!

    Arenhaus - I appreciate your answers, thanks for putting in the time and effort.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darkstrider View Post
    Wow, this is difficult to get across! I know there are speed paint techniques that are more loose and sloppy or whatever, but I often see techniques that are at the same time somewhat loose but structurally sound - like the way Fireblade does paintovers. You know, where you can see overlapping edges of semi-transparent strokes in areas, but other areas are more tight. So, a pretty specific type of speed paint that is still constructive, or at least it seems like it is.
    This thread might be what you're looking for.

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    Thanks Lulie. I recognize that thread - I used to spend a good deal of time scouring the CA boards and that thread was one of my main resources when I was learning to paint digitally. I'll re-read it as a refresher - now that I've been painting for a while another read-through might hep advance me a bit further.

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    I understand constructive to mean making it up with little or no reference. You're constructing the scene out of your head. The best method is the Reilly method for construction techniques. Everything is based on light falling on geometric planes and certain rules for atmosphere. The best Reilly info comes from a book called Pictures worth a thousand words by Apollo Dorian. It is very technical but breaks down light into basic situations for color and value. Other methods use some of the same information like the Dumond method; Reilly was a Dumond Student, so was John F Carlson.

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    Thanks dpaint. Wow, how did I never run across that book before? I've searched for books on the Reilly method and kept seeing the usual suspects but never that one. I have both of Faragasso's books, painting and drawing, and they delve into the Reilly method, plus I've downloaded the info from the Reilly Papers website and Fred Fixler's site, which uses something similar to Reilly's head breakdowns. I've read the Amazon entry for the book you mentioned and I'll put the Kindle version in my cart for possible purchase later, but I won't buy it unless I work my way through all the Reilly material I already have and need some more. But I do thank you for bringing it up here - the Reilly method is definitely great for constructive painting!

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    That's probably a wise move. The book is not a picture book. It is very dense and has lots of technical diagrams. If you have the Faragasso books some of the information is in those but again it is very dense stuff to parse out on your own. Doug Higgins has more information on his site too. Just checking the site now it looks like Doug has been expanding it from the last time I visited there. From what I understand Reilly never had a set outline during lectures so every time was unique even though he might cover the same material.

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