Need some Crit and Advice
 
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  1. #1
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    Need some Crit and Advice

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    Im looking at getting some in depth crit and advice on this little piece i started a few days ago. Anything and everything is needed. How do i push the feet further back in space, is the anatomy alright, should i render the skulls and water more or less. Just overall what needs doing to push it further.

    This originally was going to be something i would take to Oil but ive just been playing with it to much in photoshop. I havent painted a personal piece in photoshop in about 3 years and i never really had a understanding of anything back when i first started, with only minor differences in that understanding now.

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  3. #2
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    What jumps out at me is that her horns don't seem to sit symmetrically on her head. The far one seems to start more toward the center and curve inward more.
    Her jawline also looks too sharp.

    The reflected light and liquid on her body looks good, imo.

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  5. #3
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    I like your rendering on the figure. A couple things I would say would be to make her hair a different color so it stands out from the Background more. Right now it blends in too much with what's behind it. I would also put a few brighter highlights into the bloody water, like it is on her body.

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  7. #4
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    Yes, there is a perspective problem with the horns, as well as signs of camera lens distortion that got copied from the reference to the figure. Did you use a photo for reference which you followed a bit too closely?

    There are little lapses in reading the form and value here and there, also consistent with following a photo too closely without enough analysis. For example, the figure's left rib arc has an impossible "pinch" in it resulting from a misread shadow. Or, if you compare the skin tone on the body with that on the forearms and hands, it would look like the model had uneven tan from short sleeves, which you translated into the painting without thinking. (It could be possible you've meant discolouration from the water, but it reads like tan because your shading is nearly monochromatic, with not much regard to color influences.) The highlights on the body are bright white, but the lit parts are not nearly as bright as would be expected from such a strong light source. The body has those highlights, but the hair does not, and disappears completely in the black backdrop - you had not planned the value composition in that place. And so on.

    The overall effect is high incidental ("photographic") detail on the body, but guesswork on most of the rest. The perspective on the figure does not match the perspective on the water. The corpses in the background show weaker anatomy than the figure. The lighting on the water does not match the lighting on the figure. The brushwork on the skulls is completely different from everything else.

    Reference is not for copying directly. Reference is for informing your creative decisions.


    Required reading: "Color and Light" by Gurney.

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  9. #5
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    I have to agree with Irishbrush. The rendering looks nice, and I don't think any changes there would make too enormous a difference. If you could render a bit of her head with some subtle counterchange and lost/found edges I think it might really help bring her out from the background.

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  11. #6
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    I own and have read both of Gurney's books. AndI've done a lot of revisions to this based of the 4 different places I've posted for critique, and I've had some great things suggested and pointed out. I have a huge list and i'm slowly working my way through them. I mocked up the setting with a mini model and shot the Model myself under the same lighting conditions but theres only so much information i was able to get out of it..

    Im in total agreement with you arenhaus, I didn't follow the reference to a T but it didn't stray from it that much either. I was never Taught any right or wrong way, or any way for that matter so each picture i attempt to make is one big trail and error. Ive only recently started coming forth and asking for crits on what i do. They prove helpful but also incredibly daunting with how far behind i feel in relation to everyone else who's been at this more than a few years.

    An update with some of what ive been told sticks out. slowly working it all out i hope.

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