Feedback on anatomy, form and shading, please

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  1. #1
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    Feedback on anatomy, form and shading, please

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    It's been a long while since I last came here.

    Foreshortening and shading form have not been something I've always been proud of, also I'm still kind of figuring out anatomy. I like how it is now, but I'm probably overlooking something and I'd like to work on it before I go on and color it.

    Anyway:

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    Any feedback would be great, a nod that I'm going in the right direction would be good too.

    Thanks.

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  3. #2
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    Break it down into basic forms. Get the volumes and perspective right before you try to add the kneecaps. You are relying too much on the contour and not nearly enough on perspective. Have you got a preliminary construction sketch for this, to show?

    Anatomy is wonky in very many places (broken foot, guesswork face, guesswork collarbones, no thought given to muscles, impossible kneecap etc.) Use reference - and use it to analyze the volume and structure, not to copy from.

    To get shading right with a single light source, start with calculating the falling shadow. Guessing is not going to help you (unless you have years of experience with perspective).

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  4. #3
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    Thanks for the feedback.

    I can see the anatomy and shading being off after you pointed it out and I will work on that later.
    Meanwhile, here are some preliminary sketches.

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    I'm still concerned about the foreshortened arm and hand, any thoughts on them?

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  5. #4
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    You should be more concerned with the foreshortened thigh. It points exactly at the viewer and the foot behind it does not appear correct, or perhaps the knee position is incorrect, but in any case the silhouette looks very awkward.

    The question your roughs beg: why did you plan the figure in the rough, and then change the pose in the cleanup instead of reworking the rough?

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  6. #5
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    I thought the pose I have now is more interesting than what I had initially.

    *edit:
    This might asking a little much, but could you elaborate more on you feedback?
    You mention guesswork collarbone, I guess one of them is off, but is I don't think the overall placement is off, is it?
    I don't quite understand guesswork face.
    You said no thought given to muscles(I wouldn't say no thought, but I could have put in more), is there a particular area or is it all over the figure?

    Last edited by skyflame27; 2 Weeks Ago at 11:09 AM.
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  7. #6
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    No, not why you changed the pose. Why didn't you go back to planning it with balls and cylinders, after you decided to change it?

    The problem with guesswork collarbone is that you've drawn a line approximately where the collarbone is. You did not, apparently, think of the three volumes of the collarbone, of its perspective, of its attachment to other structures. You just drew a line that ought to look like it, instead of figuring the anatomy out. It's the same everywhere: you are putting down symbolic lines instead of thinking of the form, structure and anatomy.

    The muscles are mostly ignored all over the figure, yes.

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  8. #7
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    I did do the planning with boxes and cylinders, but I don't have the image saved, sorry.

    I tried to cover all the points you mentioned, though I'm not sure if I was able to get everything correctly.

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  9. #8
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    You are "fixing" individual little things but not addressing the global ones like constructing everything in perspective.

    Did you consider enrolling in a figure drawing class?

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    I'd like to, but now isn't the best time for me to do so.
    I'm technically hobbyist illustrator, so I can't justify taking a figure drawing class to be a priority.

    I'm getting the feeling you're telling me to redrawing the whole thing from scratch?

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  11. #10
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    If it helps, you can redo it from scratch or go back to the structural rough.

    But it won't produce a much different result unless you do it differently - with ten times more attention to volume, perspective and anatomy.

    Which is what I had actually been saying. Pay more attention to volume, perspective and anatomy. An artist with enough of them internalized usually has no problem going from balls-and-cylinders rough to line drawing directly. You, though, need to pay attention to every little thing. The smallest phalanx of the smallest finger must be built as a solid body in perspective; same for every bone, muscle, tip of the nose, ear cartilage. Do not guess; if you don't know a piece of anatomy, research it. If you think you know that piece, check it anyway, because you probably do not know enough.

    Do not draw a single line without thinking what solid form it describes and how it is positioned in space and how it relates to the viewpoint and what planes it creates and how it interacts with the light source.

    That is, if you want to go beyond your current level.

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  13. #11
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    Hi there! I drew up some pointers in hopes that it'll help.
    Other than anatomy, there are more important things to focus on when drawing the human form.
    If you have any questions, or comments about my tips, just let me know!

    If you need extra pointers about line of action, and gesture, here are some great Youtube videos that may help.

    How to sketch & draw people Part 1 | How to use a mannequin
    How to sketch & draw people Part 2 | Gesture Drawing


    EXTRA TIPS:
    Always thumbnail before detailing! Draw a whole bunch of tiny sketches, but don't always draw the same pose. For example, if the character is holding a sword, draw them holding it a bunch of different ways! You'll find that some poses work better than others. Most importantly choose a pose that tells your audience what you are trying to convey.

    Many professional artist thumbnail before they do any of the dirty work. Paul Richards, concept artist for Darksiders, and Halo 4, talks more about thumbnailing here: http://www.autodestruct.com/thumbwar.htm

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  15. #12
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    mparticles:

    thanks for the tips and pointers, I'd like to apply it to this drawing, but I just want to finish up this drawing. I will keep them in mind for the future.

    arenhaus:

    Thanks for your comments and critiques. I tried my best to consider volume, perspective, and anatomy and I come up with what's below. I'm probably still too reliant on the line, but I guess that's the level I'm at. I'll keep trying to work on it. I feel a lot better about my drawing now than what I had in the beginning, thanks again.

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  16. #13
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    Observe and paint, observe and paint. That's the path to success. The more you see, the better you paint.

    EDIT:
    I would suggest drawing a lot of cubes from different angles. Then carve shapes out. Extrude, carve. It doesn't have to be pretty, it just has to be consistent light-wise, and perspective-wise.

    If you can't understand how to apply basics to complex forms, try to break it down into simpler forms that can be more easily understood. That's why you should focus on the mannequin of cylinders and spheres over trying to tweak the finished piece. It's like trying to fix a house that is on a bad foundation.

    EDIT2:
    And when drawing cubes and such for training purposes, make sure to keep structure in mind. If you draw cubes and spheres sloppily, the finished piece will be sloppy and lack structure as well.

    Last edited by Sir-Cam; 1 Week Ago at 09:38 PM.
    You can just call me Cam.
    My Sketchbook.
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  18. #14
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    Hello skyflame27. Do you own a camera? Even one in mobile phone will do. Ask someone/try taking a photo of yourself on the exact same pose you have in the picture with same angle/perspective. You Will learn several things about the pose and notice that some things on your picture are essentially impossible. After that, try to find a pose that fits your idea and is possible, photograph that and learn more. And yes, redrawing the entire picture would be the thing to do.

    Couple of hints: Think/look how thick a persons legs actually are. Now look how in your picture all that mass seems to be contained inside her apparently hollow thighs? Landing gear can do that, humans not so much.. ;-) Similar stuff with lots of other things as arenhaus has already pointed out.

    Do the photo thing, observe, and be surprised. I Hope that helps.

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