Anebarone - Composition 1.1

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Thread: Anebarone - Composition 1.1

  1. #1
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    Anebarone - Composition 1.1

    Cheers!~~

    I don't have any specific question, but I'll start by talking about one of my biggest issues when it comes to painting:

    I seem to have a huge problem with focus and planning. My finished paintings often get this unrefined, "speedpaint" feel, even if it took me several hours (days) to finish them. I often reach a point in which I simply don't know how to advance anymore. I think this is one of my best works so far, even if not finished, because I'm taking my time to use references and refining everything without rushing the process (as I end up doing most of the time)... And for some reason I'm not feeling as "lost" in this one as well.

    Finding the right angles for light/shadows while setting up the lighting scheme of an environment/landscape is also very confusing for me so far. Haven't been able to retain much from the tutorials and guides I've seen so far. I hope Level UP will help me with this! ;u;

    =============================================

    Below are my studies.

    1 forgot the source. - I like the subtle play of darker values in the old lady's clothes and the (fabric?) in the left. I believe this helps creating a patch/rhythm our eyes can follow smoothly through the image.
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    2 Bouguereau's Dante and Virgin in Hell - It is interesting how value and contrast can be used to hide or highlight certain elements in a composition. Also, the men in the front almost form a rectangle that is proportional to the canvas. Cool.

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    3 Waterhouse's La Belle Dame sans Merci - Setting the right proportions and values in Photoshop was hard already, and then I decided to give pencils a try. I stopped before blowing the 1h limit, but the tones definitely need more adjustments. I ended up being caught up on too many details and left a very bright background behind them.

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    4 Thomas Eakins' Between Rounds

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    5 Caspar David Friedrich, aka my personal god, Monastery Graveyard in the Snow. I think his compositions are incredible.

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    15 to go!


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  3. #2
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    Hey there, nice start! Looks like you're actually sticking to the 1 hour limit - hard to do, but looks like you're able to simplify things down pretty well to accomplish it. Before you finish each one, go through and check your values (its fine if you go over the limit). I notice that you tend not to take the deep shadows dark enough, for instance in the boxing scene, or the tree in the last one. You may find it helpful to try and nail the darkest dark and lightest light in each painting - that way you're seeing the full range in the painting and it's a little easier to compare the other values that way.

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  5. #3
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    yeah really nice start. You are doing a good job of painting shape, value, and edge as you go, which shows your painting skills. I have pushed on this with a few people tonight and it is to try to install three quality control checkpoints as you get to this stage. 1. shapes 2. values 3. edges.

    For example, in the boxing image, the background shape that surrounds the trainer in the fighters corner is not quite as obvious in yours. It needs a bit more dark back behind those figures to get the shapes in there to read more closely. Value on the side of the boxing ring is a tiny bit darker in the original and the edge at the base of it is softened down with a softer edge.

    Three quality control check points. Look for issues in each. You see very well. I have no doubt you can find the solutions if those checkpoints are installed into the process.

    Keep up the great work.


    JM

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  7. #4
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    Thank you very much, guys! I took your advice and could definitely have worked a bit more in the edges and shapes there, but I believe my values are a liiitle bit better.

    Knud-Andreassen Baade:
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  8. #5
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    Another Knud-Andreassen Baade.

    Night environments are something I never really ventured into painting so I gave it a shot.
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  9. #6
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    Nice work. You are on the right path for sure. Your shapes and values are coming along well. Be sure that you are keeping a close eye on your edges. Note where the sharpest sharpest sharps and softest soft edges are and use them as guideposts/landmarks for the rests of the edges in the image. Edges are important to space, form, and focal areas, so getting those in there will help the piece a lot. Once you do, you will see quality improve a lot. Keep up the great work. -jm

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