GazeFromAfar - Composition 1.1

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    GazeFromAfar - Composition 1.1

    I chose this piece because i admire the artist's handling of the sleeve. I hope to have more patience in rendering complicated patterns in fabric. I found the costume and background to be simple but the artist directs your eye to the face, skull, and hand with value contrasts. I spent about an hour on this; hopefully it is acceptable for my first study.

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    Here is my second study, by John Everett Millais. I liked the variety in this piece and how the figure was composed - all white lace juxtaposed by black lace gloves. I don't like how my face came out though..

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    Here's my third, a piece by Franz Stuck. He seems to use emphasis with strong tonal values to direct your eye to the face, the snake, and the torso, and the composition seems weighted to the left and is asymmetrical. I like how he leaves your imagination to fill in the other details which are not given as much attention.

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    you are doing good work with your shapes and values. your form modeling and the subtle transitions on the skin for example could use a bit more care with an eye toward accuracy. overall these are on the right track. watch for sharp and soft edges too. you can get even more accuracy there as well.

    keep up the good work.


    jm

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    Yeah i see what you mean, thank you. Here is number four, by Edmund Blair Leighton. I chose this piece because i love the exquisite detail and realism, and the use of emphasis on the face and secondary emphasis on the blanket (or whatever she's sewing).

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    I think we just need to slow you down a bit. You are doing good work and perhaps this will help get you to the next step. When you are first getting started it is very important to really focus in on the mapping out of your shapes as accurately as you can possibly get them. If you put a shape in the wrong place and commit you end up having the other shapes off and require fixing, which increases painting time. By taking just a few extra minutes early on to measure out your shapes, to compare your shapes, and be sure they are placed and drawn accurately will make the rest of the painting process, working out your values and edges, much much easier.

    You should flip the images horizontally and vertically so that you see the shapes with fresh eyes. This should be part of the process and if you are already doing that, keep doing it more. The professional artists will often flip images or use a mirror to see with fresh eyes as many as three or four times a minute as they are working when things really get flowing. You can also back away...actually get up and back away...and doing this works for shapes as well as checking values and edges.

    Keep up the good work.


    jm

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    Ok i'll try the flipping method in the next studies. Here is the fifth study, by Jaques Louis David. I actually really hated doing this one; I don't know why I chose it. I was really struggling with patience and focus in trying for accuracy. I even used the type tool in the lower right because when I tried writing the letters freehand they looked like crap.

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    This one I think came out a lot better. I chose Edvard Munch because of his "looser" style: he isn't so concerned with rendering the crap out of everything. I think the reason why artists like Leighton achieved such fine detail is they were using hair-thin brushes to make hyper-realistic forms. Munch's brush strokes are more energetic and scribbly and are more closer to my personality. While I do admire fine detail, I don't think my personality can do that right now.

    Also I was using a different brush which allowed me to get smoother rendering. Perhaps i was just using the wrong brushes in my previous examples.

    I also wasn't sure if I should try to copy all the random brush strokes that he has on the back wall, and in the girl's shadow.

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    Here's number 7, by Odd Nerdrum. I like his Carravaggio-like use of emphasis on the figures. I spent way over an hour on this; I wanted to quit several times and throw in the towel, but I pushed through and ended up with this..

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    Last edited by GazeFromAfar; May 10th, 2014 at 11:16 PM.
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    Number 8. Here's another piece by odd Nerdrum. I really liked how ethereal and wispy his brush strokes are and his subtle use of dark accents for emphasis. I enjoyed doing this one a lot better.

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    Last edited by GazeFromAfar; May 11th, 2014 at 12:46 PM.
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    ok great...you are making fabulous progress with shapes and your values are getting closer. I think the biggest challenge for you at this point, that you can overcome just by careful study, is in your edge work.

    Note where the sharpest sharpest sharps and softest soft edges are and use them as guideposts/landmarks for the rests of the edges in the image. Edges are important to space, form, and focal areas, so getting those in there will help the piece a lot. Once you do, you will see quality improve a lot.


    Looking forward to the updates. Remember...three quality control passes. 1. shapes. 2. values. 3. edges. In that order.

    Best,


    JM

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    Thank you very much Jason!! Awesome feedback!

    Well, here is my next study. I chose it because I saw a lot of rhythm in the positioning of the limbs and how the artist used the economy of a narrow composition.

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  14. #13
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    Great job. This is right on target. A little bit of a textured brush on the background would bring it into a closer study, and the legs are a little contrasting in edge/value but overall this is right where these short term studies should be. Oh..the shape of the object his foot is resting on is a tiny bit small...

    Overall...great stuff.


    JM

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