Ps or Corel?

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  1. #1
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    Ps or Corel?

    Hey,

    Recently I decided to purchase a student version of Corel Painter, it has now taken preference over Adobe PS. However i am having certain troubles with selecting the right brush or medium within Corel.
    I am hoping to gain an insight into what works best for you and why. Is there a certain set of brushes you use?
    Or a certain program you find outweighs the other? What brushes do you use for detail and blocking, for landscapes or portraits?
    Any help or pointers will be significantly valued.

    mca

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    I used to work in Painter 6 ( and 5, 4, 3, before Corel bought it out), and mostly used the simplest brushes: Digital Airbrush, Spatter Airbrush, Square Chalk, Oil Pastel, Cover Brush (a spreading rake with a little transparency to it), Scratchboard Tool, Grainy Water. Plus a few textured brushes to simulate a sponge and some old clumpy brushes. It's not about the brushes, really; it's about what you do with them.

    Painter used to be more comfortable for painting than Photoshop, but Corel had been shoehorning it into Photoshop lookalike UI since version 8. Sadly.

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    I don't like Painter at all. I've tried it and found it to be very unreliable, crashing all the time and having other hiccups. In a professional environment, that's a no-go.

    My PS has crashed 10 times or less in the... 10? years I've been painting, and some of those instances were my own fault (using a 8000px smudge brush etc.).

    There's a reason why PS is pretty much the industry standard. What painter is great at is emulating traditional media... but then again, why not work in traditional directly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Benedikt View Post
    I don't like Painter at all. I've tried it and found it to be very unreliable, crashing all the time and having other hiccups.
    Same. What really annoyed me is it would crash when I was trying to save, which made progress totally impossible. But that was a while ago that I tried to get into it; maybe it's been improved? I strangely don't hear about many professionals using Painter. I know some people use ArtRage though.

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    I'm a Painter user too and have tried PS also. X3 is fairly stable on the mac at least. Now that I think of it, it hasn't really chrashed probably in a month or so. That said Painter's UI is not as user-friendly and it's not as slick as photoshop. Zooming is slow etc. PS is also more stable.

    I don't have a lot of experience on either however. Few months with Painter and less with PS.

    However I think Painter really shines in painting Especially blending in Painter is so effortless. I don't think you can achieve that in Ps really, regardless what brush you use.

    My staple in Painter are the following brushes:
    • Blunt Chalk with different paper textures to create nice textured surfaces. I also use this to block in color. Pen pressure adjust the amount of grain meaning the amount of paper texture showing through.
    • Soft Oil Pastel and Oil Pastel for general painting. They're great for blending too and you can achieve great variation with pressure with out the need to change value a lot.
    • Smudge for blending with grain and moving the paint around. Its good for adjusting the shapes slightly and blending more roughly.
    • Soft Blender Stump for more subtle blending. It blends and smoothes the colors but doesn't change the shapes as much.
    • Captured Bristle (from acrylics category). This I use when I wan't to leave clear bush marks. It's simple and fast.
    • With the Start! assignments I also started using the Real Clumpy Bristle and Real Tapered Bristle from the Oils. They make nice painterly strokes but are a bit slow on large sizes.
    • For really small details I use Detail Oils Brush


    These are the main ones. I occasionally use the Glow brush, different palette knives etc. The above list is however the main ones I use with the first five for 80% of the stuff I've done so far.

    Hope this helps!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TomasBj View Post
    I don't think you can achieve that in Ps really, regardless what brush you use.

    !
    Of course you can. Artwork produced in ps ranges from loose and painterly to exremely smooth and precise. Theres nothing in either software that you couldnt replicate in the other.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Benedikt View Post
    Of course you can. Artwork produced in ps ranges from loose and painterly to exremely smooth and precise. Theres nothing in either software that you couldnt replicate in the other.
    Sorry I didn't mean you can't achieve the same kind of results. I just meant that I don't think you can do blending the same way you can do with painter's blenders. You can absolutely achieve the same results just with different means.

    Here's a good tutorial / demo of blending in Painter that illustrates what I mean. Though done with a few versions older painter.
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...cs-(Painter-X)

    Last edited by TomasBj; April 18th, 2014 at 05:16 AM. Reason: Added the link
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    Ah yes, that is true. The mixer brush is relatively new in PS and kind of does that sort of "natural blending" (for a lack of a better word), but it's not nearly as efficient/ well thought out as Painter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TomasBj View Post
    I'm a Painter user too and have tried PS also. X3 is fairly stable on the mac at least. Now that I think of it, it hasn't really chrashed probably in a month or so. That said Painter's UI is not as user-friendly and it's not as slick as photoshop. Zooming is slow etc. PS is also more stable.

    I don't have a lot of experience on either however. Few months with Painter and less with PS.

    However I think Painter really shines in painting Especially blending in Painter is so effortless. I don't think you can achieve that in Ps really, regardless what brush you use.

    My staple in Painter are the following brushes:
    • Blunt Chalk with different paper textures to create nice textured surfaces. I also use this to block in color. Pen pressure adjust the amount of grain meaning the amount of paper texture showing through.
    • Soft Oil Pastel and Oil Pastel for general painting. They're great for blending too and you can achieve great variation with pressure with out the need to change value a lot.
    • Smudge for blending with grain and moving the paint around. Its good for adjusting the shapes slightly and blending more roughly.
    • Soft Blender Stump for more subtle blending. It blends and smoothes the colors but doesn't change the shapes as much.
    • Captured Bristle (from acrylics category). This I use when I wan't to leave clear bush marks. It's simple and fast.
    • With the Start! assignments I also started using the Real Clumpy Bristle and Real Tapered Bristle from the Oils. They make nice painterly strokes but are a bit slow on large sizes.
    • For really small details I use Detail Oils Brush


    These are the main ones. I occasionally use the Glow brush, different palette knives etc. The above list is however the main ones I use with the first five for 80% of the stuff I've done so far.

    Hope this helps!
    Very much appreciate your help, Ill give those a go, I've been kept busy with the detail oil brush but ill try some others

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    Quick question,
    I have put a certain paint down on my canvas and i cant get rid of it or paint over it? Is there a way to get it off my canvas?

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  16. #11
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    Use layers and the eraser. If you paint directly on the canvas there's nothing to erase to. If you paint on a layer when you use the eraser it erases paint on the layer and lets the layer beneath or the canvas to show through.

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  18. #12
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    If your unfamiliar with digital painting basics you should checkout some tutorials. For example Corel has some Painter tutorials here: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOk56ZU2iNZEauw0f_u1YQg

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    I use Painter 12 and have to say i have been pleased with it. It hasn't crashed on me, but i use relatively small canvas sizes, though it does lag when you make certain brushes too large. It has a plethora of brushes to use, but the photo manipulation tools are basic and not as advanced as Photoshop.

    A problem that I'm having now is the opacity of brush strokes controlling them with the number hotkeys. There is almost no difference in opacity unless you go to 10% or use rendered brushes. There is an option to use stroke attributes that make brushes respond more to opacity, but I fail to figure out to link it to hot key controls.

    Painter was a cheaper but viable alternative, but with Adobe's Creative Cloud subscription, Photoshop is becoming a more feasible option.

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