Book tips and some beginner questions

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  1. #1
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    Book tips and some beginner questions

    Hey everyone!

    I found about 6 weeks ago out that due to finanical difficulties in the company where i work, i will be out of a job as the company closes down in 2 weeks. So i figured i'd use the normally stagnant time in unemployment to do two things i've always wanted to do and learn - draw/paint and play piano (With the art part obviously being the reason for my presence *here*).

    I'm 28, have zero formal formal art education or training (unless you count making a horrid ashtray in high school) and i've been scribbling and sketching on paper with Faber Castell pens for about 2 months now, during my off-hours. Then i found out about this digital painting and how it works - so i've done some research about things and gone ahead and:

    * Found one of those Wacom tablets - used - an Intuos 4 Large that arrived yesterday.
    * 2 months ago, i ordered myself the Vilppu Drawing Manual and DVD's from the Vilppu academy store. A friend who knows a bit more recommended these to me and i've been through the basic "course" twice now.
    * 3 books - also after recommendations.

    "Bridgeman's Complete Guide to drawing from Life"
    "Alla Prima - Everything i know about Painting" (Richard Schmid) A gift from a friend, not my own purchase - i've never seen it here.
    "Color and Light" By James Gurney

    So far i have to be honest - only the Vilppu lessons have been of any real success to me. The other books are too advanced or deal with things i have a hard time grasping (at least as of yet).I was also lucky enough to score an...anatomy doll. (i think they're made in the USA) that are half-muscle/halfskin. The female version. It creeps my friends out to no end, but i like it .

    I obviously am quite familiar with photoshop, using it professionally, though i'll have to re-learn it for painting and drawing.

    I wanted to know if you, any of you, have other book recommendations for me - or perhaps products that i should by. I obviously also intend to start a sketchbook a.s.a.p and see what you guys think of my little progress so far.

    Enough babbling from my end - back to drawing for me!

    Hope you all have a lovely day, and wet (it's raining...) wishes from Germany.


    (Oh, i'm sorry - i hope this is the right section? Maybe Art discussion would be a better choice?)

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  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by SebastianW View Post
    Hey everyone!

    I found about 6 weeks ago out that due to finanical difficulties in the company where i work, i will be out of a job as the company closes down in 2 weeks. So i figured i'd use the normally stagnant time in unemployment to do two things i've always wanted to do and learn - draw/paint and play piano (With the art part obviously being the reason for my presence *here*).

    I'm 28, have zero formal formal art education or training (unless you count making a horrid ashtray in high school) and i've been scribbling and sketching on paper with Faber Castell pens for about 2 months now, during my off-hours. Then i found out about this digital painting and how it works - so i've done some research about things and gone ahead and:

    * Found one of those Wacom tablets - used - an Intuos 4 Large that arrived yesterday.
    * 2 months ago, i ordered myself the Vilppu Drawing Manual and DVD's from the Vilppu academy store. A friend who knows a bit more recommended these to me and i've been through the basic "course" twice now.
    * 3 books - also after recommendations.

    "Bridgeman's Complete Guide to drawing from Life"
    "Alla Prima - Everything i know about Painting" (Richard Schmid) A gift from a friend, not my own purchase - i've never seen it here.
    "Color and Light" By James Gurney

    So far i have to be honest - only the Vilppu lessons have been of any real success to me. The other books are too advanced or deal with things i have a hard time grasping (at least as of yet).I was also lucky enough to score an...anatomy doll. (i think they're made in the USA) that are half-muscle/halfskin. The female version. It creeps my friends out to no end, but i like it .

    I obviously am quite familiar with photoshop, using it professionally, though i'll have to re-learn it for painting and drawing.

    I wanted to know if you, any of you, have other book recommendations for me - or perhaps products that i should by. I obviously also intend to start a sketchbook a.s.a.p and see what you guys think of my little progress so far.

    Enough babbling from my end - back to drawing for me!

    Hope you all have a lovely day, and wet (it's raining...) wishes from Germany.


    (Oh, i'm sorry - i hope this is the right section? Maybe Art discussion would be a better choice?)
    How about free? Or nearly free. The best thing going in the art world now that is fun and helpful for artits serious about learning to draw is Proko.com. Art lessons from Stan Prokopenko. Who? I don't know. He showed up a little over a year ago and is just one of the best teachers ever. His typical lesson is about 8 minutes long and is packed with information you need to get started on a good footing. Start with the Head and then move on to his figure drawing series which he just completed. That should keep you busy and laughing for a year. Then you can watch along with the rest of us as he goes through his anatomy lessons series. More extensive but probably affordable versions of the free lessons are available for a price. And these make it possible for him to cover the production costs if you are inclined to purchase them. So far I haven't.

    Since it sounds like you may be favoring Digital, you can get similar foundational step by step principles on all facets of drawing on You Tube from Sycra Yasin. He offers more extensive lessons on working with digital media. Both of these are very helpful for drawing starters. I could bombard you with more but based on your backstory these are the people I would steer you to. Stan is a fan of Glenn Vilpuu and one of his video sessions has Glenn as a guest. Glenn also happened to be my first teacher and was dean of Cal Arts when I attended. I took life drawing lessons from him. His principles are important. (I just don't happen to get turned on by his sketches like I do with some others.)

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  5. #3
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    Hello, and welcome to CA!

    Yes, the Art Discussion forum probably would be better suited for this thread. There is already a thread stickied there with a lot of book recommendations, and you might want to try searching for other threads by beginners like yourself as this is a very common question.

    My advice is to draw from life as much as possible, starting with simple objects, and focus on accuracy. You can make simple cubes and cylinders out of paper to start with and then progress into more complex objects and arrangements when you're ready. Don't worry about mastering digital just yet as it's easier to learn to draw in a medium you're already very comfortable with (ie pencils and pens). If you try to learn to draw and learn to use Photoshop for painting at the same time, it will be harder for you to determine the source of your problems when they arise. Also, get a book on perspective.

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  6. #4
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    off the top of my head:

    Robertson - How to Draw
    Gurney: Color and Light
    Gurney: Imaginative Realism
    Mestre: Framed Ink
    Speed: The Practice and Science of Drawing
    Books by Loomis

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  7. #5
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    Thanks - and sorry for the mis-post. I'll take a look and check for a good book on perspective.

    Thanks for the booktips also, Benedikt. Took a peek at your Deviantart also - some awesome stuff!

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  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob McDonald View Post
    How about free? Or nearly free. The best thing going in the art world now that is fun and helpful for artits serious about learning to draw is Proko.com. Art lessons from Stan Prokopenko. Who? I don't know. He showed up a little over a year ago and is just one of the best teachers ever. His typical lesson is about 8 minutes long and is packed with information you need to get started on a good footing. Start with the Head and then move on to his figure drawing series which he just completed. That should keep you busy and laughing for a year. Then you can watch along with the rest of us as he goes through his anatomy lessons series. More extensive but probably affordable versions of the free lessons are available for a price. And these make it possible for him to cover the production costs if you are inclined to purchase them. So far I haven't.

    Since it sounds like you may be favoring Digital, you can get similar foundational step by step principles on all facets of drawing on You Tube from Sycra Yasin. He offers more extensive lessons on working with digital media. Both of these are very helpful for drawing starters. I could bombard you with more but based on your backstory these are the people I would steer you to. Stan is a fan of Glenn Vilpuu and one of his video sessions has Glenn as a guest. Glenn also happened to be my first teacher and was dean of Cal Arts when I attended. I took life drawing lessons from him. His principles are important. (I just don't happen to get turned on by his sketches like I do with some others.)
    Really good advice - thank you! I'm going to bookmark Prokopenko, for certain - from the look of it, it might be a definite thing to "build" upon when i'm done with Vilppu again. I've found - through the very limited amount of tests i've done - that i have no *great* difficulty applying what i do traditionally to digital, but i'll definitely take a look at Sycra Yasin too .

    Thanks again!

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  9. #7
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    Yup, Schmid and Gurney are advanced, and Bridgman works best with a solid life drawing course.
    I recommend Loomis.

    Grinnikend door het leven...
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