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Thread: mrchrishkim - Composition 1.1

  1. #14
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    rembrandt night fire

    2nd try for midtones and darktones. I choice this painting because of the variations of the dark grays and black that he used to portray the weather and the mood of the painting. I also loved how the brightest was the fire and the top left moon(?). I have tried to use all the advices with the same size, rotation, and shapes and dark tones. Any opinions, likes, advices??Name:  rembrandt night fire Combined.jpg
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  3. #15
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    Hi! Most of the shapes are in the right areas, that's good! However, your values are a lot stronger than the originals. I suspect that in this case your brain is telling you that brightest area is "white" and darkest is "black" while actually they all are just shades of grey. Different values next to each other affect the way we perceive them. Placing a light grey next to dark grey creates a contrast that makes them feel like white and black.
    While it is good to learn to find the correct values by just eyeballing them, it might be useful to first choose the value as you think it is and then test it by using the eyedropper tool on the original, just to see and learn how much there was difference and to which direction you would need to go. But try to keep estimating it yourself.
    Also, before you start to paint, you could try to find the brightest and darkest values of the painting and put splotch of those colors on the edge of your canvas, like you were using a traditional palette. You could then color-pick from those and you would know that all the shades need to be between those two and would not go over neither on dark or bright values. Finding all the midtones you could do by simply adjusting the opacity of your brush, but of course you could add a few shades of grey on the palette to speed things up. Hope that helps!

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  5. #16
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    animation backgrounds part 1

    I have chose this piece because of the different tones of gray used to portray the trees, front and back. Although, they are the same trees, they are all different sizes, shape, and color. I have found a problem with always drawing midtone to darktoned pieces... I paint it lighter than it supposed to be.. could it be perhaps that on my drawing tablet, the piece that I painted comes out lighter than it is visually seen??? Help!!Name:  childrens-world-comvined.jpg
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  6. #17
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    When you get your shapes worked out well, pay very close attention to the values. You want to match the values you see as closely as you can. It is important to be very honest about what you are seeing. try to put the accurate value down with each stroke as otherwise you end up having to fix things along the way and being accurate will save you time. Really take the time to observe and compare and choose the right value. If you are off, adjust it, don't keep working and come back to it. You are off to a good start. You just changed it to a stronger light source than there actually is. Trust your eyes...judge carefully.

    Keep it up.


    JM

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  8. #18
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    Tried something new.

    Instead of digitally painting, I have tried using oil. (Due to AP season, I haven't been uploading as much but have worked on this project). I chose this piece because the darks and lights, and how they play around with each other to show a rhythm in the body and the water. There will be two, one in color, and one in gradient map black. Name:  combined water color.jpg
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Size:  64.9 KBName:  combined water.jpg
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Size:  62.5 KBAny opinions??

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  9. #19
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    that's a beautiful piece. if you are going to work in oil...be sure you are taking every bit of time you need to be sure you are mixing the perfect value. if you go too dark or too light then the piece will be off, so take time to mix, observe, check what you mixed, then put it down as a brushstroke. it might take looking two or three times plus mixing back and forth between looking before you get it right...if not more. take each stroke as an opportunity to mix to precision.


    jm

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  10. #20
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    thank you. I actually didn't know how to use oil. Do you have anymore tips that I can use for future reference??

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  11. #21
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    a traditional process that helps is to do the following.

    a. start with the middle to dark shapes, the big masses, and keep your shadows transparenty by mixing in linseed oil or liquin or another medium (marogers for example). This will speed the drying time so you can then get going on the middle to lights. Keep the middle to darks transparent and the paint thin on the surface. This allows light to spread into the pigment and for scattering to occur in the paint...where the light bounces around in it to keep it from being too dense.

    b. use thicker paint in the light and the more light you move toward the thicker that paint can get. Look at the works of sargent, velasquez, rembrandt etc...to see that.

    This is called working "fat over lean" and if you google that with oil painting then you will find lots of articles about it. take a look.


    jm

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