mrchrishkim - Composition 1.1

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    Unhappy mrchrishkim - Composition 1.1

    First one. I chose this painting because of the simplicity of the mid tones and dark tones used to portray the mood and the economy of the painting. There is a lot of rhythm with the pen strokes and the shadows are in a rhythmical movement. Truth be told.. it was hard.. Mucha-bouquet altogether.jpgMucha-bouquet altogether.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrchrishkim View Post
    First one. I chose this painting because of the simplicity of the mid tones and dark tones used to portray the mood and the economy of the painting. There is a lot of rhythm with the pen strokes and the shadows are in a rhythmical movement. Truth be told.. it was hard.. Mucha-bouquet altogether.jpgMucha-bouquet altogether.jpg
    I'm nowhere qualified to make critiques on other's art. I'll give yours a whorl, because I really like the piece. Your sketch lines are phenomanal, and show you have some great control of the tools at hand. The only problem I have with them is the right shoulder of the model. That slight difference in the muscles, I feel, really prounounces the allure the original artist is portraying. The painting part feels as though you spent so much time on the sketching that you lost interest by the time you started painting. Maybe you were rushing the clock as it is the case with most of these assignments.

    The work is incredible, and I'm excited to see more of yours. Just slow down, and spend a little more time.

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    thank you so much for the advice ill surely use it for my next piece

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    Red face Anthony Van Dyck 1 hr

    I chose this painting because of the rhythm the hair makes against the flat black economy, making the portrait pop out. I loved his color scheme, focusing the bright lighting on her face, and surrounding the gray midtones of her hair to close her face, capturing our eyes to the center of the piece. Was hard to get the dry brush feel so I mixed it with a close to dry paint on mangastudio with a few pen marks. Anthony Van Dyck B&W combined.jpgOpinions and any advices??

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    Love your choices! Something I've found super-helpful if you're using Photoshop is to use the grid feature (under View > Show: Grid, tick and untick 'Extras' to show, and you can change the settings under Preferences) to check proportion and distances. I don't [i]think[i] it counts as cheating considering Albrecht Dürer invented a machine to do the same thing. There's also a feature called smart guides that you can use to pull down individual lines from the ruler (if you have it active) that's basically the equivalent of putting a ruler across your screen to check distances.

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    Thankss, I think I will definitely do that next time

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    NC Wyeth Boat 1 hour 15 min

    I chose this painting because of the rhythm and texture of the skies and shapes it creates. The waves are in different length and sizes and so are the clouds. He used the negative space really well to show the largeness of the painting.. Unfortunately, I made the human a giant and the boat really tiny.. other than those mistakes I've discovered... any opinions and advices?nc wyeth boat Combined.jpg

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    Great job! I still think the boater::boat looks proportionate. Maybe it's the same shot just him 10 years older; and he got a job at a contruction site? HA! The only thing I can see is the range of dark to light value is a bit shorter than the original. Some of your strokes have a feeling of speed, but this may be a personal feeling. I don't know; I got no idea what i'm talking about! Keep it up, man!

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    i'll start with the disclaimer that i'm no expert. but hope my comments will help.

    looks really good as cswalker said the basic shapes are there. valuewise what i noticed is yours seems to be far brighter. the original doesn't have so much brightness. and also this contrast is what lead the eye to the boat boy. he head is very very light, and his clothes very dark against a fairly light to midtonish-background of the cloud.

    hope that helps. keep it up and look forward to seeing more. i'm doing this assignment as well!

    - - - Updated - - -

    i'll start with the disclaimer that i'm no expert. but hope my comments will help.

    looks really good as cswalker said the basic shapes are there. valuewise what i noticed is yours seems to be far brighter. the original doesn't have so much brightness. and also this contrast is what lead the eye to the boat boy. he head is very very light, and his clothes very dark against a fairly light to midtonish-background of the cloud.

    hope that helps. keep it up and look forward to seeing more. i'm doing this assignment as well!

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    Ok great to see where you are at. When you are first getting started it is very important to really focus in on the mapping out of your shapes as accurately as you can possibly get them. If you put a shape in the wrong place and commit you end up having the other shapes off and require fixing, which increases painting time. By taking just a few extra minutes early on to measure out your shapes, to compare your shapes, and be sure they are placed and drawn accurately will make the rest of the painting process, working out your values and edges, much much easier.

    You should flip the images horizontally and vertically so that you see the shapes with fresh eyes. This should be part of the process and if you are already doing that, keep doing it more. The professional artists will often flip images or use a mirror to see with fresh eyes as many as three or four times a minute as they are working when things really get flowing. You can also back away...actually get up and back away...and doing this works for shapes as well as checking values and edges.

    Keep up the good work.


    jm

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    Corot

    I Chose this painting because he used a 2d background/poster to support the 3d model in front of us. IT really made the woman pop out and the fabric and the rhythm of the whole figure was really flowing. His use of black and whites were really played around with. This probably was really hard to draw because of the midtones and the darktones used. It was definitely a challenge and I did try to use the mirror reversing tactic any opinions or critiques?Corot woman.jpg

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    I'm nowhere near qualified to give critique, but I'll try. I think you've done nicely with capturing the elements in the painting. I see two basic problems. The values you use are too light when compared to the original painting on the skin and the background.

    The proportions are also somewhat off. The collar is too narrow and the left hand and shoulder show more under the shirt, yet the shirt on the left shoulder does not reach the edge of the painting as it does in the original. Your study is made on a much wider canvas than the original one so it's nearly imposible to get the proportions correct. You should make the study same size as the original one. I personally do it by copyibg the original into its own layer annd selecting layer content. This gives a selection with the right size. You can then either paint inside the selection or fill a layer and cut a whole in it with the selection and paint in layers underneath it.

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    watch the shape in the upper left. you went a little large there. great job on shapes other than that. the main thing at this point is to be more honest about what values you are using. you went much more high key so it seems like your levels are off. be sure you are getting your large value shapes right and you will see an immediate improvement.

    jm

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    rembrandt night fire

    2nd try for midtones and darktones. I choice this painting because of the variations of the dark grays and black that he used to portray the weather and the mood of the painting. I also loved how the brightest was the fire and the top left moon(?). I have tried to use all the advices with the same size, rotation, and shapes and dark tones. Any opinions, likes, advices??rembrandt night fire Combined.jpg

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    Hi! Most of the shapes are in the right areas, that's good! However, your values are a lot stronger than the originals. I suspect that in this case your brain is telling you that brightest area is "white" and darkest is "black" while actually they all are just shades of grey. Different values next to each other affect the way we perceive them. Placing a light grey next to dark grey creates a contrast that makes them feel like white and black.
    While it is good to learn to find the correct values by just eyeballing them, it might be useful to first choose the value as you think it is and then test it by using the eyedropper tool on the original, just to see and learn how much there was difference and to which direction you would need to go. But try to keep estimating it yourself.
    Also, before you start to paint, you could try to find the brightest and darkest values of the painting and put splotch of those colors on the edge of your canvas, like you were using a traditional palette. You could then color-pick from those and you would know that all the shades need to be between those two and would not go over neither on dark or bright values. Finding all the midtones you could do by simply adjusting the opacity of your brush, but of course you could add a few shades of grey on the palette to speed things up. Hope that helps!

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    animation backgrounds part 1

    I have chose this piece because of the different tones of gray used to portray the trees, front and back. Although, they are the same trees, they are all different sizes, shape, and color. I have found a problem with always drawing midtone to darktoned pieces... I paint it lighter than it supposed to be.. could it be perhaps that on my drawing tablet, the piece that I painted comes out lighter than it is visually seen??? Help!!childrens-world-comvined.jpg

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    When you get your shapes worked out well, pay very close attention to the values. You want to match the values you see as closely as you can. It is important to be very honest about what you are seeing. try to put the accurate value down with each stroke as otherwise you end up having to fix things along the way and being accurate will save you time. Really take the time to observe and compare and choose the right value. If you are off, adjust it, don't keep working and come back to it. You are off to a good start. You just changed it to a stronger light source than there actually is. Trust your eyes...judge carefully.

    Keep it up.


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    Tried something new.

    Instead of digitally painting, I have tried using oil. (Due to AP season, I haven't been uploading as much but have worked on this project). I chose this piece because the darks and lights, and how they play around with each other to show a rhythm in the body and the water. There will be two, one in color, and one in gradient map black. combined water color.jpgcombined water.jpgAny opinions??

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    that's a beautiful piece. if you are going to work in oil...be sure you are taking every bit of time you need to be sure you are mixing the perfect value. if you go too dark or too light then the piece will be off, so take time to mix, observe, check what you mixed, then put it down as a brushstroke. it might take looking two or three times plus mixing back and forth between looking before you get it right...if not more. take each stroke as an opportunity to mix to precision.


    jm

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    thank you. I actually didn't know how to use oil. Do you have anymore tips that I can use for future reference??

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    a traditional process that helps is to do the following.

    a. start with the middle to dark shapes, the big masses, and keep your shadows transparenty by mixing in linseed oil or liquin or another medium (marogers for example). This will speed the drying time so you can then get going on the middle to lights. Keep the middle to darks transparent and the paint thin on the surface. This allows light to spread into the pigment and for scattering to occur in the paint...where the light bounces around in it to keep it from being too dense.

    b. use thicker paint in the light and the more light you move toward the thicker that paint can get. Look at the works of sargent, velasquez, rembrandt etc...to see that.

    This is called working "fat over lean" and if you google that with oil painting then you will find lots of articles about it. take a look.


    jm

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