Bobby Rebholz - Composition 1.1

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Thread: Bobby Rebholz - Composition 1.1

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    Bobby Rebholz - Composition 1.1

    Hey everyone! I'm really excited about this. I also just realized how difficult it is just with tones.

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    Thomas Moran is my favorite environment artist so I'm probably going to do several of his works.

    I noticed that he uses a lot of economy areas and then hits you with a crisp line. It happens quickly but he does it in a way where it's not clustered in one area. In this painting, he has the sky meet the mountains in the background with both crisp edges and economy edges. I also really like how he makes us focus on the men riding the horses by darkening the two sides of the pathway using very dark boulders. I'm also just going to keep my layout like this too.

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    Last edited by Bobby Rebholz; March 10th, 2014 at 02:17 PM.
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    beautiful job on the landscape. that one is very close. only the lower part of the image...the bottom 20 percent...seems to have some big differences. the corot is also nicely handled, although i think you need to observe a little more closely when painting things like the face or the values of the arm. i can tell you got into painting and weren't observing as much as you were in the abstract parts of the painting. keep those eyes moving back and forth. great work. jm

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    Good points. For this one, I tried keeping my eyes moving more because I feel that background plays a big part in this composition. There's a great economy affect by the horse's legs because it looks like the background morphs right into them. The overall composition has a nice balance because the figure and the horse have slight lean to them and that shadow at the bottom plays a big role in the balance. I still need to work at getting all of the shapes in there. I'm looking at it now and shaking my head ha.

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    I noticed in this Bierstadt painting that there is a zigzag pattern in the center that really makes our eye move back and forth at different points.

    Doing these in 1 hour isn't long enough for me. I need to take longer on them for sure until I get better.

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    Last edited by Bobby Rebholz; March 11th, 2014 at 05:03 PM.
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    great job. for quick studies these are very much on point. you could pick up the surface texture a little stronger in the wyeth and double check your foreground rock shapes in the bierstadt. really though you are on the right track. keep up the great work.


    j

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    Portraits are tough.

    As I sketched this, I noticed a couple of things. There is no crispness to it. It seems the majority of the edges have a slight blurred touch to them. The figure feels like he really belongs in the setting Rembrandt painted him in. Secondly, The emphasis on the face is put in full display because of the light tones against a very dark backdrop.

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    Great job Looks accurate to me. Just two little things that might help, the light area in the background in your top left is just a little strong and the darkest shape on the right side (his left arm) is more like a triangle. If the top of this shape continued through his face it would intersect about half way up his nose. Other than that superb study!

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    agreed with bri...

    also, please do watch your gradations in the head as well...

    keep up the great work. you are on the right track.

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    I spent more time on made sure tones were blending more. The tones in the his coat versus the background were very difficult! Such a subtle difference.

    I noticed in this painting that the two focal points are made clear. They are the face and then what he's writing on. The face gets the lightest treatment while the book, hands and pen get the second brightest treatment. This is all connected nicely by his arm forming a curve from the head to the hands.

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    haha...awesome. this made me happy to see. the texture work on the background is so good. there are some subtle differences in the head drawing and structure but for what we are doing here, this is ace.

    keep up the great work.


    j

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    Thanks Jason!

    I tried speeding up the process for this one and realize some areas that are off. This painting made me do a triple take because after I was finished, I had no idea there is a violin resting against that tree. I was just painting shapes and didn't realize it!

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    that is a sign that you are seeing shapes abstractly very well. they stop being things and start just being shapes. I didn't see that either so thanks for pointing that out. you are on the right track...keep up the great work. no feedback necessary...just more more more.

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    After doing this, I realized how much fun head studies can be. In this painting, there are excellent examples of light and dark forming shapes on the face. For instance, the wrinkles on his forehead and eye sockets. Eye socket shadows and basically our heads being lit from above have always been a trouble spot for me. I notice a lot of Economy in this with the gray tones of the hair morphing almost seamlessly with the background tones. Rembrandt wants us to focus just on the face and he accomplished that.

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    These are great! If you have time, how do you manage your brushes? do you have a batch of preset brushes or do you use the default brushes and manipulate their properties to suit the stroke? Looking forward to more studies!

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    Hey thanks Ben! well it's a combination of what you said. There's a huge number of brushes you can download at digitalbrushes.tumblr.com I'm currently still figuring out my best options from there. There's literally more than 500 custom made brushes from well known artists on there. There's another set I use called Blur's Goodbrush set version 4. There are some excellent oil brushes in there and I just tweak the settings in Photoshop.

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    Nice stuff! Just few tiny highlights to nose, forehead and hair and Rembrant would have twin brother

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby Rebholz View Post
    Hey thanks Ben! well it's a combination of what you said. There's a huge number of brushes you can download at digitalbrushes.tumblr.com I'm currently still figuring out my best options from there. There's literally more than 500 custom made brushes from well known artists on there. There's another set I use called Blur's Goodbrush set version 4. There are some excellent oil brushes in there and I just tweak the settings in Photoshop.
    I will have to have a look. Thank you for the advice I look foward to more paintings from you. take care.

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    In this piece, There is an emphasis put on the horseman in the center. It took me a minute to realize the dark shapes to the left are the rest of the horse riders following the man. Maybe that's because those dark shapes aren't meant to capture our attention at first. There is a cool rhythm to the painting in that the flat areas of the foreground and the secondary cliffs take our eyes from left to right. Then you have the vertical trees in the foreground followed by the large cliffs in the background that are also vertical.

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    You are doing fabulous work. I am not even going to get in your way. keep up the great work.

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    Thanks Jason. These grayscale sketches are teaching me so much that I'm almost at a disbelief.

    I notice in this painting that Gentileschi uses a really nice core shadow along her body and it flows from her legs all the way to her arms while keeping a nice up and down feel. Our eye travels very well. That snake wrapped around her wrist, to me, is the focal point but he handled it so well that it's not distracting.

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    I was intrigued by this painting because of the balance and repetition. The two mounds and then the two clusters of cows help to balance this piece out. For the repetition, there is a mound on the left followed by a group of cows and then the same theme repeats in the middle ground. The cool thing is there's slight variety simply by placing the cows on the mound and leaving the one's in the foreground strictly on the grass.

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    the cleopatra you have a bit stronger light on the figure. double check your lights and darks at the very end to be sure you are on point. the pastoral scene is awesome...great job. watch the cow gesture as he is kind of sniffing..in the one you did. he is more relaxed in the other..or she.

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    I'm starting to notice several things not just in this particular painting, but portraits in general. When seeing these is gray value only, so much more emphasis is put on the skin than anywhere else. I used to always give too much of a contrast between the subject matter and the background. Here, his hair and parts of his jacket are almost morphing into the background tone. The emphasis is his face and his slight lean forward completely changes the composition than if he were just sitting upright. It gives so much more movement.

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    agreed. these are looking great. if you can nail that surface texture a little more it would be very hard to tell the original from the study, and that is a great place to be. keep up the great work.


    jm

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    Thanks Jason. I agree. The textures will really help push these more. I also was thinking about what you said in the #10 study. The values are off on the woman's body so in this Gainsborough study, I spent more time checking values and making sure textures were in there. This particular one was tough!

    I think there's a great sense of balance in this piece because of the hair and lower body. The hair is big and wide, then our eye travels down to the neck before the shoulders expand outward giving the viewer that wide direction again. I was actually surprised at finding an old portrait with someone smiling too.

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    this is excellent..if you can get the values and gradations on the face, as well as the edges of the face, a little closer this one will really look great. The orignal has a little stronger light on the hand, and a little less light on the chest near the hand. Keep up the great work.

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    This one was especially challenging because of all of the subtle value changes without the values contrasting too much.

    This piece has a very intriguing composition and balance. The blade comes down straight but because of her bent arm and hand slightly wrapping around it, our eye travels across her shoulders diagonally which brings us down to the dead man. Piazzetta didn't need to describe too much of her face. There's so much story here.

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    excellent work. piazzetta was always a fave of mine. You did a nice job on the study and so I just encourage you to keep going. You are on track.


    jm

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    Thanks Jason. I'm pretty sure I'll be studying Piazzetta more and more!

    For this Borch study, I see that centering the subject matter works really well. We're often told that centering the subject matter usually isn't good but this one works. This approach offers a good balance to the piece because the subject is so large that we're not bombarded by a busy background. I think the main emphasis on this piece is the man slightly leaning forward and looking to his right. It's so subtle but so effective. We want to look with him. Lifting the back horse leg and showing it in the light also helps the balance too. Subtle motion really draws us in.

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