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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Manley View Post
    try to stick to images older than 76 years old, as those you can do anything you want with them...is all public domain. secondly, that time period prior is of the best painters in the world. tiepolo, bouguereau, bonnat, lefebvre, lyendecker, gerome, degas, bierstadt, church, friedrich, ingres, delaroche...though contemporaries like wyeth and frazetta are also worthy studies...dean cornwell too.


    j
    Yes, probably better to avoid any IP issues! Thanks for the list of artists. I have been looking over their work and it is beautiful stuff. Thanks!


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  3. #17
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    Name:  Study 5.jpg
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    Name:  study 5 process.jpg
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    I chose this painting because I love the sense of balance and Rhythm. I see rhythm in the placement of the limbs. There is a pleasing criss cross flow from top to bottom due to the folded leg. There is also a nice balance in values from the dark dress the girl is wearing to her dark hair. I also noticed how the plant in the right corner of the painting has been skillfully placed to balance out the darks where the wall the girl is leaning against ends on the right side. If you remove this plant balance is lost!I also like the subtle use of variety with the placement of
    the fingers on the girls right hand especially the ring finger.I did this study without using any layers and just focusing
    on speed and blocking in...trying to get to the 1 hour mark. This Study took about 5 hours.

  4. #18
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    Your process is a patient one as you are rendering details before getting all of your values mapped in and the painting roughed in a general to specific way. Try to avoid tiny brushes for the first hour at least. Try using bigger brushes with marks carefully placed to knock in a shape with just one or two or three marks...look and see the shape, choose the brush, choose the value, look again, double check, put the mark..check again. if you start with the bigger brushes and work smaller as you go I think you will find you get a lot further a lot faster.

    keep it up.


    j

  5. #19
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    Hi Jason

    Thank you for the feedback. I will try larger brushes first, and then dial in on the details once everything is blocked in. I find I get lost and spend a lot of time zooming in and working on hands and faces getting the details right. Also I find that I am spending lots of time trying to get the blends and subtle gradations of value correct. I just think I need to keep doing more studies until this process if faster for me. Any suggestions on blending using Adobe photoshop cc? Currently, I blend at about 40% opacity.

    Thanks Again! 

  6. #20
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    Name:  Study 6.jpg
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    Name:  study 6 step 1.jpg
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    Biblis by William Adolphe Bouguereau – I chose to do this study because I love the horizontal composition – all the horizontal lines add to the serene relaxed feeling of this painting. Economy is used in the background to focus the eye on the woman. I see rhythm used in the placement of the limbs of the figure and the tall grass behind the figure. I really like how the grass runs perpendicular to the figure which bridges the background to the foreground. Emphasis is placed on the figure with the high contrast values – she really pops off the page!
    I also see rhythm in the placement of the highlights in the water – beautiful horizontal lines that add to the overall horizontal composition.

  7. #21
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    Good stuff! Nice work on the last one. I definitely agree that focusing on the bigger shapes will help you out a lot, and it looks like you did that a little more with this one.
    You still need to watch your values - I notice that on both of the Bouguereaus you didn't pump up the brightest brights enough, for instance on the little girl's shoulder.

    Keep up the good work!

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  9. #22
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    nice work. your values on your figure are a little bit high key...shadows could be darker. also if you look at the bouguereau there is almost a glow around the figure as she is so radiant...check your values that surround the figure to see what i mean. keep up the great work too.

    jm

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  11. #23
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    Name:  Study 7 sunrise on the matterhorn-reduced.jpg
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    A beautiful mountain scene by Bierstadt. I love the sense of atmosphere and depth in this painting. The composition is balanced with perpendicular diagonal lines that zigzag from the top to the bottom (see below). I went for speed and for the first time did not zoom in for details!! which is huge for me. this took 1 hour 45 minutes! usually takes me more than 5 hours! something about going faster gives the painting more life. Seems if you overwork the details the painting gets stale and static.

    Name:  study 7 comp study.jpg
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  12. #24
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    great job on the shapes. the light seems to be striking the mountain a little stronger up top and a little less strong on the small one in the middle right. overall the values look great and this one is a very solid study. keep up the good work.


    jm

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  14. #25
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    Hey, great stuff here! Some of em' might benefit from a bit of softness here and there on surfaces, but your brushwork is cool to see. Hadn't noticed your Biblis before I did mine and it's nice to see how you did yours. Your brushwork is so peaceful, I get a feeling that mine is unnecessarily rushing all over, definitely something to think about. Thanks

  15. #26
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    yep looking forward to the update.

    jm

  16. #27
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    Name:  Study 8 John William Waterhouse - Destiny01a.jpg
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    I love the complexity of this composition and figured it would be very challenging to do in 1 hour. I was drawn to the dichotomy of the vast openness of the ocean in juxtaposition to the intimate interior space the woman occupies - all captured with the simple reflection of a mirror. There is repetition and variety in the circular shapes found i.e. the globe, the mirror, and the arches and more subtle is the inward curve of the book stand. John could just have easily made the stand square with out a curve. In addition there are nice horizontal lines/planes that cut through the composition in a balanced manner such as the horizon line of the ocean and the wall the corinthian columns stand upon. I was focused more on speed and capturing the overall composition rather than trying to get a super polished time wasting replica. I spent 2 hours on this study.

  17. #28
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    really nice job on your values. I pointed the following out to another earlier and it relates to you so I share. When you are first getting started it is very important to really focus in on the mapping out of your shapes as accurately as you can possibly get them. If you put a shape in the wrong place and commit you end up having the other shapes off and require fixing, which increases painting time. By taking just a few extra minutes early on to measure out your shapes, to compare your shapes, and be sure they are placed and drawn accurately will make the rest of the painting process, working out your values and edges, much much easier.

    You should flip the images horizontally and vertically so that you see the shapes with fresh eyes. This should be part of the process and if you are already doing that, keep doing it more. The professional artists will often flip images or use a mirror to see with fresh eyes as many as three or four times a minute as they are working when things really get flowing. You can also back away...actually get up and back away...and doing this works for shapes as well as checking values and edges.

    Keep up the good work.


    jm

  18. #29
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    Thanks Jason! I did notice that I spent a lot of time reshaping and modifying. When you say measure do you mean use a ruler? is there a formal method of doing measurements you speak of or is it all based on personal style? I am just wondering if I were to go to art school if they would tell me "you do measurements this way" Right now I basically use a grid system to map out values. any pointers would be super awesome! thanks again for the feedback and this forum!

  19. #30
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    how it is done with traditional work can be seen on cast-drawing.com which is using plumb lines. you can measure using your pen or a ruler or the ruler in photoshop if need be. I prefer that you learn to eyeball it but a lot of the top realist painters will almost all find a way to measure more accurately than just eyeballing stuff.

    you do what works best for you. there is no right answer or wrong one.

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