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  1. #1
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    Bri in the sky - Composition 1.1

    I chose 'Ahasuerus at the end of the world' by Adolf Hirémy-Hirschl simply because it's one of my favourite paintings.

    The painting has an interesting rythm through the placement of the figures ice and crows. There are various digonals at work in this painting that create a visual flow and balance. I believe the primary focus is on the figures in the background and the eye is lead down to rest on the female (secondary focus) in the forground. The rock at her head leads the eye back up to the start of the main diagonal ice mass where the eye is lead around the canvas again.

    I believe the crow in the bottom right corner is key to the balance of the picture and the wing placement helps reinforce the flow to the forground figure. The crow above her derriere and the diagonal of the ice under the angel helps hold the eye in this postion.

    Visual weight is acheived in the diagonal placement. The light of her head with the light of the ice in the bottom corner, the dark crow balances the dark mass in the top left. The dark figures with the dark areas in the female hair and above her head.

    There is variety,contrast,balance found between the sharp and harsh edges of the ice with the softness of the fabrics in the clothing, clouds, angel glow and the skin of the figure.

    I have to work on my edge control. I seem to have missed a lot of the sharp edges...

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  3. #2
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    'L'Enfant du Regiment' by John Everett Millais.

    I chose this painting becuase it stirs me emotionally.

    A book I have says it's a boy, but to me it's a girl and she is the primary focus. Secondary focus I would say is the crypt and Knight which leads us down to a third focus in the top left corner.

    Beautiful economy can be found in the simplicity of the jacket, with few details, I know right away this is a military jacket. The strong dark mass instantly draws and holds our attention in the central area of the girl, this is reinforced by the two triangular stone structures below which also help pull our attention up and also creates with visual weight.

    Balance and rythm can be found in the stone work. The level of detail in the stonework fades out around the girl especially above her head which helps hold the focus on the little girl.

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    Two paintings I have never seen before. Amazing. Great choices too. The first study is very close but the edges could be more closely observed. The second one is much closer and where these need to be. Keep up the great work.

    Jason

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  6. #4
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    Yep I'm working to improve my edge control. Cool that you had never seen those ones before

    Another favourite, 'Flaming June' by Sir Frederic Leighton. Spent more than an hour on this as it turned out to be way more difficult than I imagined.

    The emphasis here is on the seagul in the distance riding the waves.. Kiddin, the emphasis is on her soft dreaming face. The hair and fabic folds seem to do most of the work in this painting. They are arranged in a radial formation that both frames the girl and creates a circular flow. There is economy to be found along her thigh in it's simplicity, the softness is maintained in the central area which contrasts with the folds, this creates a sense of relaxation and helps reinforce the deep dream like state conveyed. The sea and the marble floor helps with the balance and Visual weight, this is also acheived with the dark masses on either side.

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    Well you sure aren't screwing around. Love that you are taking on such challenging pieces. The flaming june is a really challenging image. Your values and edges are coming along very well. You are on the right track. Keep at it. Inspiring to see this happening.


    JM

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  9. #6
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    just seen your colour and light self portrait and flipped through your sketchbook. Your very good. these are coming along nicely. Inspiring stuff.

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  11. #7
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    W!L- Thanks for taking the time to have a look, really appreciate it man.

    Jason- I'm taking this very seriously, don't want to waste my chance to learn and get feedback from someone who knows what they are talking about.

    So I chose Sargent next simply because he is John Singer Sargent and his work speaks for itself.

    Study 4-Sargent 'Reconnoitering'

    Study 5- Sargent 'Beatrice Townsend'

    Sargent makes the most beautiful brush marks, and I thought it would be wise to try and pay attention to them. I'm not familiar with making nice marks and textures with digital so I figured this would be a good opportunity to try and learn. Kill two birds with one stone maybe.
    Took time to find two chalk brushes that seemed pretty cool then tried painting on a sandpaper background for the first one and a wood panel for the second.
    These are taking me way longer than 1 hour as I'm simply not skilled enough or experienced enough to consider all the information present and work at a fast pace with digital but I'm trying my hardest. I'm also enjoying it so much, feel like the paintngs are pulling me in.

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    YAY Sargent! I am in awe of his stuff. I have studied three myself. these are great. love the girl portrait. nice work on capturing the features. i found that hard working so small. A few nitpicky things. her dress looks slightly too dark compared to sargents and her hair is alot softer almost flwing into the background on sargents compared to yours. plus the terriers highlights are a brighter in sargents. But overall thats greta stuff. her face is amazing. what size are you wroking at? like your backgorund texture.

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    Hey W!L. Sargent is/was the man!

    Yeah I see a lot wrong with every pic so far. That's the problem though, as every time I stop then come back there is always something that needs fixing. Guess there comes a point where you just have to move on. The face took me a while, I'm stubborn like that with faces. If there is a heavy emphasis on a face I just won't move on until it is close. Will measure the shit out of it if I have to.
    Size? Just zoom right out and get the shapes down, then work in and refine a bit. Didn't zoom out so much with the sargent ones as I was trying to anaylze his brush strokes. I know it's mean't to be a value study, but I'm trying to learn as much as possible from each study.

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    some of the background texture is really working great. The vertical lines going through it are distracting a lot. i would avoid doing that.

    great job though. You handled the figure and the dog beautifully.


    Jason

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  16. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bri in the sky View Post
    Size? Just zoom right out and get the shapes down, then work in and refine a bit. Didn't zoom out so much with the sargent ones as I was trying to anaylze his brush strokes. I know it's mean't to be a value study, but I'm trying to learn as much as possible from each study.
    Yes i do same thing. sorry I meant what size as in pixel width and length?

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  17. #12
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    Jason- Yep you are right, took a min to paint over them...... Just noticed they are still showing here and there. Ah well, I won't use the lines again.

    W!L- Ah my bad. I have a new document saved that is always set to 2000x2000. 300 pixels per/inch. Always start with that and just resize the canvas when needed. Any larger and My laptop gets all pissy.

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  18. #13
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    I chose Richard Schmid as he is another master of brush marks. The Bonus is he is still alive. Only came across him about 4 months ago.

    Some of his sketches/paintings are all about economy, he often renders the area of interest combining expressive and precise brush strokes, leaving much of the canvas untouched. This style appeals to me so much.

    Study 6- 'Chicken'. I chose this painting because it taught me so much just by looking at it. I am not particularly fond of chickens nor do I find them particularly pleasant to look at, but the beauty of this painting is mesmerising. It taught me that the painter can take even the most uninteresting subject and transform it into something beautiful. That technique is more important than subject. It might be argued that he loves chickens and this comes through in his painting, but something tells me this man could make a turd look beautiful.

    Study 7- 'Grechen Sewing'. Nice contrasts here putting emphasis on the female, think it's his daughter. She is bathed in light creating such a soft and radiating feeling, it feels like she is glowing. You can tell he loves this person dearly. The painting feels so alive, he has captured that moment perfectly and when I look at it, I almost feel like I'm in the room. Just look at those brush marks! I love you Richard!


    My favourite 'still breathing' artist without a doubt

    Oh and managed to go a bit quicker with these ones which I'm super happy about.

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