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  1. #1
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    InPursuitOfArt - Becoming a Self-Taught Artist Blog

    Hey guys I wanted to introduce my blog to you in the hopes that it might motivate you to never give up, to help speed your progress up by showing you my mistakes and to just share the journey I've been on for the past few years.
    I've been learning on my own, I've never taken an art class, I've never drawn or have been interested in art before the age of 22. I just decided to try it out one day and I haven't stopped since. I've decided to take this seriously last year, this is at the age of 25 and I hope to be able to help you as well.

    I really wanted to share this post, it's entitled The Key Behind Progress and Learning, it's about your brain, why you learn and how to learn best, I think it's one of the most important things you should ever learn about, because with this knowledge you can master anything.

    The Key Behind Progress and Learning
    “I hear and I forget, I see and I remember I do and I understand” – Confucius

    A lesson is not learned when you can recite its contents word for word, or when you receive an A in school or an excellent diploma, nor when you are able to speak about your subject at length and impress your listeners. A lesson is learned by doing, when it becomes so much a part of you that it seems like you always knew its contents, that you were born knowing how to do it or at least there was a piece of that knowledge in you before you ever even knew about it. You might not even be able to put it into words. When someone asks you “How do you do that?” you can’t even begin to think how to explain it, you just know how to do something and it feels natural – a part of who you are, that is the essence of learning. But how does that happen?...

    I don't want to make the page massive long, so please check out the rest of the post here

    Thank you very much. I'll share more things here as I write them.
    Last edited by volen; May 7th, 2014 at 03:28 AM.


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  4. #2
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  5. #3
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    Thanks, you're amazing.

    New post guys, this one's a step by step tutorial about how I drew and rendered my first car after months of struggling with perspective. There's also a vid on how to practice perspective linked in there. Hope it helps
    http://www.inpursuitofart.com/blog/c...ctive-drawing/
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  6. #4
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    I'm yet to see human figure drawn with those perspective grids. Why is that?

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    Cool blog, I'll definitely check it out from time to time! I can see that car is heavily inspired by the Spyker C8

    Got a question for you, I'm trying to become a self-taught artist as well. I'm not in school right now, only working on saturdays at the moment (looking for something fulltime to save up money to move to NYC) and I have trouble thinking of stuff to practice or just ideas to draw or sketch. For example, I have the most boring job ever, I work in a small shop by myself and sometimes there's an hour between two customers so I've got shitloads of time on my hands then for sketching and stuff. Like you said in the anti-procrastination post, that would be a perfect time to practice some but most of the time I just can't think of anything to practice or draw. Of course I can practice anatomy some more which I've already done a lot so that's quite boring, I don't think perspective practice would be very useful at this point for me and if I did know a subject to practice then I wouldn't know what to draw in order to practice it if you know what I mean. Practice perspective, sure, but what do I draw that uses perspective to practice it.

    never mind all that babbling I just did. Basically, my question is; how do you keep up the inspiration? Finding time in my day to draw is not the hard part for me, I just can never think of anything to make that time useful with. It's more often that I don't know what to draw than that I do, even when I want to draw. This saturday for example, I was again bored out of my mind at work and I always take my sketchbooks with me but I just couldn't think of anything to draw, couldn't find the inspiration. How do you deal with it? Do you have the same problem, or do you never have trouble starting to draw?
    I wish I could draw 12 hours a day, and when I'm working on a painting it's not too hard to work from breakfast to dinner uninterrupted but that's a situation where I already have an idea and I just have to execute it. I wish I could work that much when I'm not working on a big painting. I wish I could work that long just doing several sketches in my sketchbook, then a speedpainting or two on my laptop, perhaps some more in my sketchbook.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PhanThom-art View Post
    never mind all that babbling I just did. Basically, my question is; how do you keep up the inspiration? Finding time in my day to draw is not the hard part for me, I just can never think of anything to make that time useful with. It's more often that I don't know what to draw than that I do, even when I want to draw. This saturday for example, I was again bored out of my mind at work and I always take my sketchbooks with me but I just couldn't think of anything to draw, couldn't find the inspiration. How do you deal with it? Do you have the same problem, or do you never have trouble starting to draw?
    I've been drawing in lectures and meetings for years now and here's how I deal with it. First off, look around you. Is there something you can draw? Don't look for "interesting" or "inspiring" things, look for 3D things that aren't too complex or amorphous. Most stores have stuff behind the counter or around the counter that can be drawn. I have a lot of pictures of coffee cups, my shoes, people's hands, the kettle, the view outside the window, folds on people's jackets and so on.

    Sometimes you're just in a room where everything is inconvenient to draw, though, and at that point I make shit up. The first rule of drawing for entertainment is to not worry about what it looks like. In fact if it looks awful and ridiculous, so much the better. You can draw beautiful figures at home in front of the internet. When you're stuck somewhere boring for an hour, that is the time to turn boxes into ridiculous robots and cones into wizard hats. Draw random shapes and see what you can make out of them. Improv is a different skill than practice and it has different rules. It's idea generation. It doesn't need to look good, because you can always take it home and look up reference and make it better.

    Make it a goal to fill up a sketchbook page every day that you have free time at work. If that's too hard because OMG sketchbook has to be pretty, bring a clipboard with some cheap printer paper. Fill up a sheet. If you are forced to put something down, anything, you will eventually have to get over yourself and your desire to make something "nice". Go back to being a kid and drawing shit just because. Then go home and work out how to make it look good.
    *** Sketchbook * Landscapes * Portfolio * Store***

    "There are two kinds of students: the self-taught and the hopeless."
    - Dr. Piotr Rudnicki

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  10. #7
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    @Leonor - The grid can be used for anything, it's a very mechanical tool though, I suppose it might make your figure a bit clunky and static, also you don't really need to measure proportions and distances so much with a human figure, the grid also helps a lot with symmetry, so it's great for duplicating halves of mechanical objects, figures would very rarely be even close to symmetrical

    @PhanThom-art - Thanks man The car is more than inspired by the Spyker 8 I've yet to try and design a car... maybe some time soon...
    As for the inspiration - you have to look for things that interest you, get exposed to more things. I was doing the same thing when I started out, I was under the impression that things are just supposed to come out pouring from your head all the time. At the risk of making the process less glamorous I have to say that the people who say that creatives are people who take things and modify them slightly are completely right. You'd rarely be tempted to just sit down and create a world, but stare at a soda can for a long enough time and you might start thinking about where it came from, where it's been, the material it's made of, the bacteria that live in it, where the soda could be now, how it affected the person who drank it. You could have a world set in the soda can or a world mimicking the history of the can, a world made of soda cans or a world without soda cans that suddenly has one introduced.

    I don't know what you're interested in or even what field you're wanting to work in. Whatever it is - practice the relevant things for that area. If it's illustration find ways to tell visual stories, figure out how to render things, look at a lot of other artists' work, do master studies, learn to simplify details and imply more than you render. Learn to paint impactful scenes. If it's concept design then look at how things are put together, practice your fundamentals until they are ingrained. You say you don't know how to practice perspective (I've made a video about that by the way https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=km_UYsMlczM ) build the objects around you, see if you can draw the sides of objects you can't see. Take an object and draw it from multiple viewpoints without reference to the object. If boxes are too simple then try cars, if cars are simple then move on to more complex mechanical objects. Anatomy and perspective are tools, they're not goals in themselves. You don't really get any benefit from merely knowing perspective or anatomy, but the use of these tools is where the power is. If your fundamentals are good, then you can actually start doing the work that art is for - tell stories, make statements, create objects, explore everything. Through perspective I got interested in architecture, in technology, in how mechanics and physics work. Anatomy gives you the power to tell human stories. If your anatomy is good, then start exploring characters, see how different anatomy implies different personages, pose people as they would be in real life, don't just do anatomy studies for the sake of anatomy studies.

    If you don't know where to start just get a tablet and download, at random, a few thousand pictures, put them on there and when you're at work just flick through them and draw everything. Doesn't have to be elaborate, just draw everything, observe things and see what makes you interested. Try architecture, different periods, then use that architecture to tell a story or just invent your own time and place. Study people and put them in a scenario. Look at the people around you, see what they do, how they act, there are so many interesting things everywhere. Set yourself weekly goals or weekly research topics - spend a week on noses or weapons, squirrels or russian dolls, anything that catches your attention and just keep doing that. Draw all the time. That's the key to constant improvement
    Good luck man, your boring job is a blessing, just find ways to utilize your time, figure out ways to challenge yourself and to keep moving. It's not just you, this is by far the most commonly asked question I get and I struggle with this too, that's why I write about it in the blog. Also, don't just draw and paint - read too. Understanding objects and the function of things will make you so much more aware of why things exist and it'll make you even more interested in everything. Pick up a novel too or some short stories, I read for years before I was ever even interested in art and I can definitely say it changed my whole world. Just try new things Hope that helps.

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    Thank you so much for the reply man. I'll try doing quick sketches from photos and just simple things more. I guess that could be a gateway to find something that interests me like you said, and if that doesn't happen then it will keep me practicing stuff anyway until I come up with an idea that I do want to do an elaborate painting on. I guess I'm just a bit too picky with my subjects. The soda can was a good suggestion too, take things out of context or abstract them. It's true that most concept artists get ideas from changing existing things, I should try that too.
    About what I want to do; I basically just want to become an all-round concept artist in the movies and games industry. I want to become proficient in every field (characters, architecture, environments, vehicles, creatures) to become as attractive as possible for possible employers if you know what I mean. I've been practicing my anatomy as a basis for characters and reading books about anatomy as you said and I've begun practicing cars a bit, to get to designing space ships and other vehicles and I'm planning to practice the other things as well.

    Again, thank you so much for your advice. I'm going to try and keep up the drawing a bit more consistently now. Sometimes I hardly drew for several weeks between my digital paintings, but I'm going to try and connect the bigger projects with practicing and sketching, filling up my sketchbooks

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    @PhanThom-art - Glad I could help, man. I hope you've been working hard the past month and have found something to pursue.

    Sorry for disappearing guys, I've been away for pretty much all of March and have only recently started updating and working again, had some personal trouble, wrote a post about it here , but the new thing I wanted to share is this. I made a video showing my earliest work and what a poor start I had, hoping to inspire others who are doubting if they could learn. I hope it helps.


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  14. #10
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    Hey, I am only now starting out with the whole digital painting/concept art thing, even though it has been a dream of mine since forever. I am not planning to take any courses on it, as my financial situation would not allow it and I am already studying something else.

    Therefore, I would like to thank you for your effort. I have already started reading your blog, and I have bookmarked it. Please do keep up the good work. Thank you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Architect View Post
    Hey, I am only now starting out with the whole digital painting/concept art thing, even though it has been a dream of mine since forever. I am not planning to take any courses on it, as my financial situation would not allow it and I am already studying something else.

    Therefore, I would like to thank you for your effort. I have already started reading your blog, and I have bookmarked it. Please do keep up the good work. Thank you.
    Thanks very much for the comment and the kind words, I definitely will do. I don't have anything comprehensive about people just starting out, at least nothing like a practical plan that I've tried to think about and develop, I do have this video though, about Art Fundamentals, and it basically tries to go over and make something like a framework of progress, how learning one thing unlocks another and to not feel bad if you've tried some of the things that are inaccessible yet, because you've not got gone through the process of unlocking the fundamentals... I think 1 video definitely isn't enough to go through all that stuff in detail, I'll have to think about expanding with some practical stuff, but here's the vid anyway, I hope it's helpful and good luck now that you've started


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    New video guys, it'll be a whole series, I can't just talk for 10 minutes, I need to take my time... I want to do an overview of my first year of studying, I've decided to split it into about 5 vids, this one is a look at of some of the biggest problems I've struggled with, switching from theory to practice and how process is developed. Enjoy


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    New blog post everybody Some motivation for you guys. Short preview below. Let's get to work!



    http://www.inpursuitofart.com/blog/f...beginning-end/

    Failure is the beginning, not the end

    How long would you give a baby to learn how to walk?

    Answer: As long as it takes.

    Jim Rohn



    I remember when I first started learning to draw. I’ve talked about it before in posts and videos. I’ve thought of it before too. And each time I think about it I find something new that I hadn’t seen before. At the time when this was happening my utter failures were utter defeats. Each scribbled, ugly drawing was a sign of hopelessness with no chance of success, it was evidence of my futile, wasted efforts. Improvement did not come no matter how hard I tried or wished for it. My level of frustration could not be put into words. It was a daily excruciating experience.

    Let me put this into perspective for you so you don’t think that I’ve gone completely nuts here. Learning is supposed to be fun, right? Or at least it could be fun. If someone shows you a road, gives you a process that you can follow and reveals to you the transformation you will undergo if you do what you’re told then – yep, that sounds like a fun ride, that’s exciting and awesome. But if you are unaware of the fact that there is a process, that a road exists and that a transformation is even possible – then that feeling is like living in a prison. It’s being condemned to your genetics, talents, previous experience, environment, childhood, upbringing, whatever you can think of – all of those become things to blame your failures on and you get locked in further in your cell, because those things become excuses and you no longer see yourself as responsible for what happens to you. You were set up to fail. The deck was always stacked against you.

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