Art: Portrait and Figure Drawing
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  1. #1
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    Portrait and Figure Drawing

    Check out my paintings @
    www.adamcarnes.com
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  2. #2
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    They look a bit dull, flat. You need more values, and the strokes must try to follow the form of the face.
    Push on your pen... more... more! Don't be afraid
    Some face doesn't look good too... something bother me, but I can't say what.
    Otherwise... continue, it's not bad at all

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    Nice shading, although i would smooth out the lines more, but this looks to be your style.

    I think the tapering off of the shoulders takes away from the drawings. There is too much detail in the face(first image) for you to not render out the shoulders...same goes for the other two, but especially the first. To be honest, it almost hints at laziness not to render out the shoulder, only because the face is so detailed that it would seem doing a shoulder would be cake.

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  4. #4
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    scarletnocturne- I understand exactly what mean on the shoulder neglect comment. I have noticed that in other peoples work, but I thought that I was doing it purposeful in mine. I have seen some artist only render the focus area in high detail and leave the rest very simple and implied. I will finish the shoulders in future portraits and see how it goes. Thanks for the comment, it helped alot. Good criticism, really appreciated.

    Orban- could you elaborate? I don't know where the darker values and more values are needed. What looks flat, specify areas on certain drawings? Thanks for the criticism.

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  5. #5
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    The first one is the strongest, by far.. even though its in pretty high key, the value relationships are the most clear, and the proportions are the most careful.. i like the handling of the hair as well..

    i think most of the other ones suffer from a lack of definite shading pattern, they're a bit scribbly.. that mighta been what you were going for but i dunno.. the last one especially.. i think if you kept the hatching lines a bit closer together, and got more of a feel of the roundness and softness of the skin, it would look way better.. the neck lost all sense of structure and anatomy on that one too... The rest are somewhere in between as far as quality goes.. Good that you're doing these from life..

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  6. #6
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    I think you have a good eye and you understand anatomy and structure pretty well. How you go about explaining this with your lines is what needs less repose.

    A lot of your lines are realy straight and long. For instance in the third drawing the left side of the guy's face is explained with these long, straight lines. It flattens it out. Same with the lady's neck in the 5th peice. I think you should shorten the lines up and make them follow the contour of the surface.

    Also, in the 1st, 3rd, and a 5th portrait you have these geometric, hard shapes showing up. Those flatten your peice out because you don't see that stuff in organic forms (detracts from realism) and hard shapes hog your eye. That's why stop signs are octagons - the Department of Transportation wants your eye to go straight to them.



    If you see those shapes pop up you need to brake them down. It's realy hard to get rid of those though when you render with line work. You should try finishing the work with solid values only (no lines) or break the shapes down with shorter strokes and play with line width.

    And yeah these could use more contrast. Just look at other portrait artist's work. Typically the eyelashes, pupil, lid, hair, crease in the mouth, ect are hard black.

    Sorry I blasted you.

    Last edited by RefrigeratorCo; July 29th, 2004 at 02:47 PM. Reason: had to leave, didn't finish
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  7. #7
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    RefrigeratorCo- thank you for taking the time to illustrate what you where commenting about . I see what you mean, I need more subtle tonal transitions in the larger flatter areas to convey roundness and brake up the shapes. Your comments helped alot. Also, I have been looking at Ingres work alot lately and his light drawings have been influencing me.

    Main Loop- I like to let my linework show, to a certain degree. I am experimenting with fast marks and building them up. I have this image in my head of a woodcut rendered realistically. Basically I am trying to breed realism with expressive mark making. Recently, I have been approaching my drawings similar to the way that I paint= first I do quick, gestural straight lines to block in the contours. then I slowly build up middle tone layers of hatching, erase my lights, then lay in the darks(for the most part).
    Also, thanks for the suggestions, I will consider the softness of skin and how to convey that in future drawings.

    Check out my paintings @
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    Here is another, keeping in mind everyones suggestions.


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    The use of darker values definitely makes an immediate impact, just keep working and refining and continue to push the values more; it still looks unfinished but much better than before. Also, in some of your strokes (especially noticable by his right arm/shoulder region, watch out on the crosshatch that's almost a 90 degree crosshatch. I notice you tend to use it as an outline, which should be avoided unless you want a more graphic look, but to me, it doesn't seem like that was your intent.

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    I like the first and the fourth pictures the best. The strokes are more carefull and delicate. I especially think the first piece is working well. I don't mind the high key and I can feel the form in the face. I think you faded the shoulders just right. The picture reminds me of a delicate etching.
    About your most recent piece: it definately has impact and depth. I think he looks like a real person.
    I like both styles. The most recent piece is more of a "hit you across the room" piece, while the first one is a "come and appreciate me more closely" piece.

    keep posting, I like seeing your work,
    emily

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  11. #11
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    jetpack42 is offline Registered User Level 15 Gladiator: Spartacus' Hoplomachi
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    the weird erasing lines squibbling around the top of the head really distract, in this latest piece. a single erase, around the figure, can be good...but the randomly chaosed lines really strike me in a portrait built around shape and order.

    keep posting, enjoying this thread.

    I self-published a book on the fundamentals of drawing from life.

    http://www.amazon.com/Fundamentals-D...8951905&sr=8-1

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    great work and critiques

    These really seem to capture individual personality and uniqueness, and seem alive to me. Thanks for starting this, and thanks to all those who critiqued. I found the critiques helpful for my own work. Judy

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    The paper on this one has a bad tooth. Last time I use cheap paper for a more in depth drawing.


    Judy Warner- thanks for the compliment.

    jetpack42- next time I will try blending my erase marks more and see how it goes.

    emily g- thanks. I enjoy experimenting with different styles and do like the way the first and last came out.

    makotierra- good crits. my pace picked up in the arm area, so my marks were less careful. For some reason, I tend to outline my work. Even when I am conscious of it, it is hard to stay away from. Maybe it is because I really enjoy contour drawings.

    Check out my paintings @
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  14. #14
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    wow i can defiantly see progress dude!

    rock on!

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